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Amazon DevPay
Developer Guide (API Version 2007-12-01)

DevPay Fees

This section describes the Amazon DevPay fees and the situations in which they are applicable.

Quick Summary of the Fees

You pay:

  • 3% of your value-add per customer

  • $0.30 per DevPay product for each customer bill we collect

Note

Your value-add per customer is the amount you charge each customer on top of the cost of the AWS services they used.

When we calculate the 3% fee amount, we use the value-add amount before any $0.30 DevPay fees have been subtracted.

The following sections give more details and examples of the fees.

Basic Concepts

To describe how the fees work, we'll start by describing some basic concepts.

You create a DevPay product and set a price for it. Your customers buy and use the product. At the end of each month, we determine three amounts for each customer:

  • Customer revenue—The total amount your customer owes for using the product that month

  • AWS costs—The costs of AWS services the customer used that month

  • Your value-add—The difference between the customer revenue and the AWS costs

Your customer revenue is based on the price you set for your product. This includes any one-time sign-up charge, monthly charge, and usage-based charges.

What you owe AWS for each customer each month varies if your value-add is greater than or equal to zero, or less than zero.

When Your Value-Add Is Greater Than or Equal to Zero

When the revenue expected from the customer is greater than or equal to the AWS costs, and the customer actually pays the money, you pay AWS the items shown in the following list and illustration:

  • AWS costs

  • DevPay fee: 3% of your value-add

  • DevPay fee: a $0.30 fee per product for each customer bill we collect

Note

If you have multiple products, you are assessed $0.30 for each product the customer subscribes to.

Fee for value-add greater than or equal to zero

If the customer doesn't pay, you pay AWS nothing. If the customer pays part of what's owed for the month (for example, if the customer pays the monthly charge, but doesn't pay the usage-based charges), then you pay the AWS costs and 3% DevPay fee in proportion to how much the customer has paid. You still pay the $0.30 transaction fee. For more information, see If a Customer Doesn't Pay the Monthly Bill.

When Your Value-Add Is Less Than Zero

Although it will be unlikely, there might be instances when the expected revenue from the customer is less than the AWS costs. If this occurs, and the customer actually pays, you pay AWS the items shown in the following list and illustration:

  • AWS costs

  • DevPay fee: a $0.30 fee per product per customer bill collected

Fee for value-add less than zero

If the customer doesn't pay what's owed (and so you receive no revenue from that customer for the month), you pay no DevPay fees. You pay only the AWS costs not covered by the expected revenue amount (as shown in the following illustration). This is equivalent to the absolute value of your value-add amount.

If the customer pays part of what's owed, then you pay the AWS costs in proportion to how much the customer has paid. You still pay the $0.30 transaction fee. For more information, see If a Customer Doesn't Pay the Monthly Bill.

Fee for value-add less than zero when customer doesn't pay revenue

Examples

In the following examples, you have an Amazon EC2 AMI that you're selling through DevPay. A customer uses the AMI during the month of April. The product's pricing scheme includes only usage charges; it has no one-time or monthly recurring charges. AWS charges for Amazon EC2 based on the costs described in Allowed Usage-Based Charges. However, for simplicity, the examples reflect only some of those possible costs and assume use of only small instances of the AMI.

Note

The Amazon EC2 prices shown in the following examples were valid when this document was originally written. The prices might have changed since then. For the current Amazon EC2 prices, go to the Amazon EC2 product page.

The top table in each example shows your product's price and the corresponding AWS cost for Amazon EC2.

The bottom table shows your customer's usage amounts during April, the corresponding price the customer pays, the corresponding Amazon EC2 cost, and your corresponding value-add.

The equation at the bottom shows the total DevPay fees you owe for that customer for the month of April.

Example DevPay Fees When Your Value-Add Is Greater Than or Equal to Zero

In this example, your price results in a value-add that is greater than zero (the revenue your customer generates in the month is greater than the costs of the AWS service used). In this situation, you pay both the 3% fee and the $0.30 transaction fee. Note that if your value-add is zero, your 3% DevPay fee is zero.

Example: Value-add greater than or equal to zero

Example DevPay Fees When Your Value-Add Is Less than Zero

In this example, your price is lower than in the preceding example and results in a value-add that is less than zero (the revenue your customer generates in the month is less than the costs of the AWS service used). In this situation, we don't charge the 3% fee. However, we still charge you the $0.30 transaction fee when we collect from the customer.

Example: Value-add less than zero