Menu
Amazon Relational Database Service
User Guide (API Version 2014-10-31)

DB Instance Class

The computation and memory capacity of a DB instance is determined by its DB instance class. You can change the CPU and memory available to a DB instance by changing its DB instance class; to change the DB instance class, you must modify the DB instance. For pricing information on DB instance classes, see Amazon RDS Pricing.

The DB instance class you need depends on your processing power and memory requirements. There are DB instance classes that support both "bursty" database access and sustained access. For best practices suggestions on determining your memory needs, see DB Instance RAM Recommendations. For more information about storage choices, see Storage for Amazon RDS.

Current Generation DB Instance Classes

Current generation DB instance classes include the following:

Instance TypeCurrent Generation DB Instance Classes
Standard Current Generation (db.m4)

db.m4.large | db.m4.xlarge | db.m4.2xlarge | db.m4.4xlarge | db.m4.10xlarge

Memory Optimized Current Generation (db.r3) db.r3.large | db.r3.xlarge | db.r3.2xlarge | db.r3.4xlarge | db.r3.8xlarge
Burst Capable Current Generation (db.t2) db.t2.micro | db.t2.small | db.t2.medium | db.t2.large

Standard Current Generation (db.m4)

Standard Latest Generation (db.m4) instances are third generation instances that provide more computing capacity than the second generation db.m3 instance classes at a lower price. This DB instance class requires that the DB instance be in a VPC.

Note

The db.m4 instance classes are not available for the South America (São Paulo) or China (Beijing) regions.

Current generation instance classes are available for the following DB engines:

DB EngineAvailability
Amazon AuroraAurora is not supported.
MariaDBAll versions are supported.
Microsoft SQL Server

See DB Instance Class Support for Microsoft SQL Server.

MySQLMySQL version 5.5, 5.6, and 5.7 are supported.
Oracle

See DB Instance Class Support for Oracle.

PostgreSQLAll versions are supported.

Memory Optimized Current Generation (db.r3)

Memory Optimized Current Generation (db.r3) instances are second generation instances that provide memory optimization and more computing capacity than the first generation db.m2 instance classes, at a lower price. The db.r3 DB instances classes are not available in the South America (São Paulo) region.

Memory optimized instances (db.r3) are available for the following DB engines:

DB EngineAvailability
Amazon AuroraAll versions are supported.
MariaDBAll versions are supported.
Microsoft SQL Server

See DB Instance Class Support for Microsoft SQL Server.

MySQLMySQL version 5.5, 5.6, and 5.7 are supported.
Oracle

See DB Instance Class Support for Oracle.

PostgreSQLAll versions are supported.

MySQL DB instances created after April 23, 2014, can switch to the db.r3 instance classes by modifying the DB instance just as with any other modification. MySQL DB instances running MySQL versions 5.5 and created before April 23, 2014, must first upgrade to MySQL version 5.6. For information on upgrading a MySQL DB instance, see Upgrading Database Engine Versions. For more information, see R3 Instances in the Amazon EC2 documentation.

Burst Capable Current Generation (db.t2)

Burst Capable Current Generation (db.t2) instances are instances that provide baseline performance level with the ability to burst to full CPU usage. This DB instance class requires that the DB instance be in a VPC.

If you have an existing DB instance that you want to move to the db.t2 DB instance class, note that the db.t2 DB instance class requires a VPC; if your current DB instance is not in a VPC, see Moving a DB Instance Not in a VPC into a VPC to find out how to move a DB instance not in a VPC into a VPC. For more information about T2 instances used with the db.t2 DB instance class, see T2 Instances in the Amazon EC2 documentation.

DB EngineAvailability
Amazon AuroraAurora version 1.9 and later supports the db.t2.medium instance.
MariaDBAll versions are supported.
Microsoft SQL Server

See DB Instance Class Support for Microsoft SQL Server.

MySQLMySQL version 5.5, 5.6, and 5.7 are supported.
Oracle

See DB Instance Class Support for Oracle.

PostgreSQLAll versions are supported.

Previous Generation DB Instance Classes

Previous generation DB instance classes include the following:

Instance TypePrevious Generation DB Instance Classes
Standard Previous Generation (db.m3)

db.m3.medium | db.m3.large | db.m3.xlarge | db.m3.2xlarge

Standard Previous Generation (db.m1)

db.m1.small | db.m1.medium | db.m1.large | db.m1.xlarge

Memory Optimized Previous Generation (db.m2)

db.m2.xlarge | db.m2.2xlarge | db.m2.4xlarge

Micro Instances (db.t1.micro) db.t1.micro

Standard Previous Generation (db.m3)

Standard Previous Generation (db.m3) instances are second generation instances that provide a balance of compute, memory, and network resources, and are a good choice for many applications.

Standard Previous Generation (db.m1)

Standard Previous Generation (db.m1) instances are previous generation general-purpose instances. For more information, see Instance Type in the Amazon EC2 documentation. PostgreSQL version 9.5.2 and MySQL version 5.7 do not support previous generation instance classes.

Memory Optimized Previous Generation (db.m2)

Memory Optimized Previous Generation (db.m2) instances are first generation memory-optimized instances. For more information, see Instance Type in the Amazon EC2 documentation. PostgreSQL version 9.5.2 and MySQL version 5.7 do not support this instance class.

Micro Instances (db.t1.micro)

Micro Instances (db.t1.micro) are instances sufficient for testing that should not be used for production applications. PostgreSQL version 9.5.2 and MySQL version 5.7 do not support this instance class. For more information, see the Micro Instances topic in the Amazon EC2 documentation.

Specifications for All Available DB Instance Classes

The following table provides details of the Amazon RDS DB instance classes.

Instance ClassvCPUECUMemory (GB)EBS OptimizedNetwork Performance
Micro Instances

db.t1.micro

1

1.615NoVery Low

db.m1.small

1

11.7NoVery Low
Standard - Current Generation (VPC only)

db.m4.large

2

6.58450 MbpsModerate

db.m4.xlarge

4

1316750 MbpsHigh

db.m4.2xlarge

8

25.5321000 MbpsHigh

db.m4.4xlarge

16

53.5642000 MbpsHigh

db.m4.10xlarge

40

124.51604000 Mbps10 GBps
Memory Optimized - Current Generation

db.r3.large

2

6.515NoModerate

db.r3.xlarge

4

1330.5500 MbpsModerate

db.r3.2xlarge

8

26611000 MbpsHigh

db.r3.4xlarge

16

521222000 MbpsHigh

db.r3.8xlarge

32

104244No10 Gbps
Burst Capable - Current Generation (VPC only)

db.t2.micro

1

11NoLow

db.t2.small

1

12NoLow

db.t2.medium

2

24NoModerate

db.t2.large

2

28NoModerate
Standard - Previous Generation

db.m3.medium

1

33.75NoModerate

db.m3.large

2

6.57.5NoModerate

db.m3.xlarge

4

1315500 MbpsHigh

db.m3.2xlarge

8

26301000 MbpsHigh

db.m1.small

1

11.7NoLow

db.m1.medium

1

13.75NoModerate

db.m1.large

2

27.5450 MbpsModerate

db.m1.xlarge

4

415450 MbpsHigh
Memory Optimized - Previous Generation

db.m2.xlarge

2

6.517.1NoModerate

db.m2.2xlarge

4

1334.2500 MbpsModerate

db.m2.4xlarge

8

2668.41000 MbpsHigh

Note

The table column information includes:

  • vCPU – A virtual CPU, or virtual central processing unit, is a unit of capacity that you can use to compare DB instance classes. Instead of purchasing or leasing a particular processor to use for several months or years, you are renting capacity by the hour. Our goal is to provide a consistent amount of CPU capacity no matter what the actual underlying hardware.

  • ECU – The EC2 Compute Unit provides the relative measure of the integer processing power of an Amazon EC2 instance. In order to make it easy for developers to compare CPU capacity between different instance classes, we have defined an Amazon EC2 Compute Unit. The amount of CPU that is allocated to a particular instance is expressed in terms of these EC2 Compute Units. One ECU currently provides CPU capacity equivalent to a 1.0-1.2 GHz 2007 Opteron or 2007 Xeon processor.

  • Memory (GB) – Specifies the RAM memory, in gigabytes, allocated to the DB instance. Note that there is often a consistent ratio between memory and vCPU. For example, the db.m1 DB instance class has the same memory to vCPU ratio as the db.m3 DB instance class, but db.m3 instance classes provide better, more consistent performance that db.m1 instances for most use cases. db.m3 instance classes are also less expensive than db.m1 instances.

  • EBS-optimized – DB instance uses an optimized configuration stack and provides additional, dedicated capacity for Amazon Elastic Block Store (Amazon EBS) I/O. This optimization provides the best performance for your Amazon EBS volumes by minimizing contention between Amazon EBS I/O and other traffic from your instance. For more information about Amazon EBS–optimized instances, see Amazon EBS–Optimized Instances in the Amazon EC2 documentation.

  • Network Performance – The network speed relative to other DB instance classes.