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Amazon Route 53
Developer Guide (API Version 2013-04-01)

Document History

The following entries describe important changes in each release of the Amazon Route 53 documentation.

2017 Releases

April 10, 2017

When you use the Amazon Route 53 console to transfer a domain registration to Amazon Route 53, you can now choose one of the following options for associating the name servers for the DNS service for the domain with the transferred domain registration:

  • Use the name servers for an Amazon Route 53 hosted zone that you choose

  • Use the name servers for the current DNS service for the domain

  • Use name servers that you specify

Amazon Route 53 automatically associates these name servers with the transferred domain registration.

2016 Releases

November 21, 2016

You can now create health checks that use IPv6 addresses to check the health of endpoints. For more information, see Creating and Updating Health Checks.

November 15, 2016

You can now use an Amazon Route 53 API action to associate an Amazon VPC that you created with one account with a private hosted zone that you created with another account. For more information, see Associating an Amazon VPC and a Private Hosted Zone That You Created with Different AWS Accounts.

August 30, 2016

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Name Authority Pointer (NAPTR) resource record sets – You can now create NAPTR resource record sets, which are used by Dynamic Delegation Discovery System (DDDS) applications to convert one value to another or to replace one value with another. For example, one common use is to convert phone numbers into SIP URIs. For more information, see NAPTR Format.

  • DNS query test tool – You can now simulate DNS queries for a resource records set and see the value that Amazon Route 53 returns. For geolocation and latency resource record sets, you can also simulate requests from a particular DNS resolver and/or client IP address to find out what response Amazon Route 53 would return to a client with that resolver and/or IP address. For more information, see Checking DNS Responses from Amazon Route 53.

August 11, 2016

With this release, you can create alias resource record sets that route traffic to ELB Application Load Balancers. The process is the same as for Classic Load Balancers. For more information, see Alias Target.

August 9, 2016

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for DNSSEC for domain registration. DNSSEC lets you protect your domain from DNS spoofing attacks, which are also known as man-in-the-middle attacks. For more information, see Configuring DNSSEC for a Domain.

July 7, 2016

You can now manually extend the registration for a domain and register a domain with an initial registration period longer than the minimum registration period specified by the registry. For more information, see Extending the Registration Period for a Domain.

July 6, 2016

If you're an AISPL customer with a contact address in India, you can now use Amazon Route 53 to register domains. For more information, see Managing an Account in India.

May 26, 2016

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Domain billing report – You can now download a report that lists all domain registration charges, by domain, for a specified time period. The report includes all domain registration operations for which there is a fee, including registering domains, transferring domains to Amazon Route 53, renewing domain registration, and (for some TLDs), changing the owner of a domain. For more information, see the following documentation:

  • New TLDs – You can now register domains that have the following TLDs: .college, .consulting, .host, .name, .online, .republican, .rocks, .sucks, .trade, .website, and .uk. For more information, see Domains That You Can Register with Amazon Route 53.

  • New APIs for domain registration – For operations that require confirmation that the email address for the registrant contact is valid, such as registering a new domain, you can now programmatically determine whether the registrant contact has clicked the link in the confirmation email and, if not, whether the link is still valid. You can also programmatically request that we send another confirmation email. For more information, see the following documentation in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference:

April 5, 2016

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Health checks based on CloudWatch metrics – You can now create health checks that are based on the alarm state of any CloudWatch metric. This is useful for checking the health of endpoints that can't be reached by a standard Amazon Route 53 health check, such as instances within an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) that have only private IP addresses. For more information, see the following documentation:

  • Configurable health check locations – You can now choose the Amazon Route 53 health checking regions that check the health of your resources, which reduces the load on the endpoint from health checks. This is useful if your customers are concentrated in one or a few geographic regions. For more information, see the following documentation:

  • Failover in private hosted zones – You can now create failover and failover alias resource record sets in a private hosted zone. When you combine this feature with metric-based health checks, you can configure DNS failover even for endpoints that have only private IP addresses and can't be reached by using standard Amazon Route 53 health checks. For more information, see the following documentation:

  • Alias resource record sets in private hosted zones – In the past, you could create alias resource record sets that route DNS queries only to other Amazon Route 53 resource record sets in the same hosted zone. With this release, you can also create alias resource record sets that route DNS queries to Elastic Beanstalk environments that have regionalized subdomains, Elastic Load Balancing load balancers, and Amazon S3 buckets. (You still can't create alias resource record sets that route DNS queries to a CloudFront distribution.) For more information, see the following documentation:

February 23, 2016

When you create or update HTTPS health checks, you can now configure Amazon Route 53 to send the host name to the endpoint during TLS negotiation. This allows the endpoint to respond to the HTTPS request with the applicable SSL/TLS certificate. For more information, see the description for the Enable SNI field in the "Values that You Specify When You Create or Update Health Checks" topic. For information about how to enable SNI when you use the API to create or update a health check, see CreateHealthCheck and UpdateHealthCheck in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

January 27, 2016

You can now register domains for over 100 additional top-level domains (TLDs) such as .accountants, .band, and .city. For a complete list of supported TLDs, see Domains That You Can Register with Amazon Route 53.

January 19, 2016

You can now create alias resource record sets that route traffic to Elastic Beanstalk environments. For information about creating resource record sets by using the Amazon Route 53 console, see Creating Resource Record Sets by Using the Amazon Route 53 Console. For information about using the API to create resource record sets, see ChangeResourceRecordSets in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

2015 Releases

December 3, 2015

The Amazon Route 53 console now includes a visual editor that lets you quickly create complex routing configurations that use a combination of Amazon Route 53 weighted, latency, failover, and geolocation routing policies. You can then associate the configuration with one or more domain names (such as example.com) or subdomain names (such as www.example.com), in the same hosted zone or in multiple hosted zones. In addition, you can roll back the updates if the new configuration isn't performing as you expected it to. The same functionality is available by using the Amazon Route 53 API, AWS SDKs, the AWS CLI, and AWS Tools for Windows PowerShell. For information about using the visual editor, see Using Traffic Flow to Route DNS Traffic. For information about using the API to create traffic flow configurations, see the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

October 19, 2015

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Domain registration for .com and .net domains by Amazon Registrar, Inc. – Amazon is now an ICANN-accredited registrar for the .com and .net top-level domains (TLDs) through Amazon Registrar, Inc. When you use Amazon Route 53 to register a .com or .net domain, Amazon Registrar will be the registrar of record and will be listed as the "Sponsoring Registrar" in your Whois query results. For information about using Amazon Route 53 to register domains, see Registering Domain Names Using Amazon Route 53.

  • Privacy protection for .com and .net domains – When you register a .com or .net domain with Amazon Route 53, all of your personal information, including first and last name, is now hidden. First and last name are not hidden for other domains that you register with Amazon Route 53. For more information about privacy protection, see Enabling or Disabling Privacy Protection for Contact Information for a Domain.

September 15, 2015

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Calculated health checks – You now can create health checks whose status is determined by the health status of other health checks. For more information, see Creating and Updating Health Checks. In addition, see CreateHealthCheck in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

  • Latency measurements for health checks – You now can configure Amazon Route 53 to measure the latency between health checkers and your endpoint. Latency data appears in Amazon CloudWatch graphs in the Amazon Route 53 console. To enable latency measurements for new health checks, see the Latency measurements setting under Advanced Configuration ("Monitor an endpoint" Only) in the topic Values that You Specify When You Create or Update Health Checks. (You can't enable latency measurements for existing health checks.) In addition, see MeasureLatency in the topic CreateHealthCheck in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

  • Updates to the health checks dashboard in the Amazon Route 53 console – The dashboard for monitoring health checks has been improved in a variety of ways, including CloudWatch graphs for monitoring latency between Amazon Route 53 health checkers and your endpoints. For more information, see Monitoring Health Check Status and Getting Notifications.

March 3, 2015

The Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide now explains how to configure white label name servers for Amazon Route 53 hosted zones. For more information, see Configuring White Label Name Servers.

February 26, 2015

You now can use the Amazon Route 53 API to list the hosted zones that are associated with an AWS account in alphabetical order by name. You can also get a count of the hosted zones that are associated with an account. For more information, see ListHostedZonesByName and GetHostedZoneCount in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

February 11, 2015

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Health Check Status – The health checks page in the Amazon Route 53 console now includes a Status column that lets you view the overall status of all of your health checks. For more information, see Viewing Health Check Status and the Reason for Health Check Failures.

  • Integration with AWS CloudTrail – Amazon Route 53 now works with CloudTrail to capture information about every request that your AWS account (including your IAM users) sends to the Amazon Route 53 API. Integrating Amazon Route 53 and CloudTrail lets you determine which requests were made to the Amazon Route 53 API, the source IP address from which each request was made, who made the request, when it was made, and more. For more information, see Using AWS CloudTrail to Capture Requests Sent to the Amazon Route 53 API.

  • Quick Alarms for Health Checks – When you create a health check by using the Amazon Route 53 console, you can now simultaneously create an Amazon CloudWatch alarm for the health check and specify who to notify when Amazon Route 53 considers the endpoint unhealthy for one minute. For more information, see Creating and Updating Health Checks.

  • Tagging for Hosted Zones and Domains – You can now assign tags, which are commonly used for cost allocation, to Amazon Route 53 hosted zones and domains. For more information, see Tagging Amazon Route 53 Resources.

February 5, 2015

You now can use the Amazon Route 53 console to update contact information for a domain. For more information, see Values that You Specify When You Register a Domain.

January 22, 2015

You now can specify internationalized domain names when you're registering a new domain name with Amazon Route 53. (Amazon Route 53 already supported internationalized domain names for hosted zones and resource record sets.) For more information, see DNS Domain Name Format.

2014 Releases

November 25, 2014

With this release, you now can edit the comment that you specified for a hosted zone when you created it. In the console, you just click the pencil icon next to the Comment field and enter a new value. For more information about changing the comment by using the Amazon Route 53 API, see UpdateHostedZoneComment in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

November 5, 2014

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following new features:

  • Private DNS for Amazon Virtual Private Clouds–You now can use Amazon Route 53 to manage your internal domain names for Amazon Virtual Private Clouds (VPCs) without exposing DNS data to the public internet. For more information, see Working with Private Hosted Zones.

  • Health check failure reasons–You can now see the current status of a selected health check, as well as details on why the health check last failed, as reported by each of the Amazon Route 53 health checkers. The status includes the HTTP status code, and failure reasons include information about numerous types of failures, such as string matching failures and response timeouts. For more information, see Viewing Health Check Status and the Reason for Health Check Failures.

  • Reusable delegation sets–You can now apply the same set of four authoritative name servers, known collectively as a delegation set, to multiple hosted zones that correspond with different domain names. This greatly simplifies the process of migrating DNS service to Amazon Route 53 and managing large numbers of hosted zones. Using reusable delegation sets currently requires that you use the Amazon Route 53 API or an AWS SDK. For more information, see the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

  • Improved geolocation routing–We further improved the accuracy of geolocation routing by adding support for the edns-client-subnet extension of EDNS0. For more information, see Geolocation Routing.

  • Support for Signature v4–You can now sign all Amazon Route 53 API requests using Signature version 4. For more information, see Signing Amazon Route 53 API Requests in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

July 31, 2014

With this release, you now can do the following:

July 2, 2014

With this release, you now can do the following:

  • Edit most values in health checks. For more information, see Creating, Updating, and Deleting Health Checks.

  • Use the Amazon Route 53 API to get a list of the IP ranges that Amazon Route 53 health checkers use to check the health of your resources. You can use these IP addresses to configure your router and firewall rules to allow health checkers to check the health of your resources. For more information, see GetCheckerIpRanges in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

  • Assign cost allocation tags to health checks, which also lets you assign a name to health checks. For more information, see Naming and Tagging Health Checks.

  • Use the Amazon Route 53 API to get the number of health checks that are associated with your AWS account. For more information, see GetHealthCheckCount in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

April 30, 2014

With this release, you can now create health checks and use a domain name instead of an IP address to specify the endpoint. This is helpful when an endpoint's IP address either is not fixed or is served by multiple IPs, such as Amazon EC2 or Amazon RDS instances. For more information, see Creating and Updating Health Checks.

In addition, some information about using the Amazon Route 53 API that formerly appeared in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide has been moved. Now all API documentation appears in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

April 18, 2014

With this release, Amazon Route 53 passes a different value in the Host header when the health check Port value is 443 and the Protocol value is HTTPS. During a health check, Amazon Route 53 now passes to the endpoint a Host header that contains the value of the Host Name field. If you created the health check by using the CreateHealthCheck API action, this is the value of the FullyQualifiedDomainName element.

For more information, see Creating, Updating, and Deleting Health Checks.

April 9, 2014

With this release, you can now view what percentage of Amazon Route 53 health checkers are currently reporting that an endpoint is healthy.

In addition, behavior of the Health Check Status metric in Amazon CloudWatch now shows only zero (if your endpoint was unhealthy during a given time period) or one (if the endpoint was healthy for that time period). The metric no longer shows values between 0 and 1 reflecting the portion of Amazon Route 53 health checks that are reporting the endpoint as healthy.

For more information, see Monitoring Health Checks Using CloudWatch.

February 18, 2014

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following features:

  • Health check failover threshold: You can now specify how many consecutive health checks an endpoint must fail before Amazon Route 53 considers the endpoint unhealthy, between 1 and 10 consecutive checks. An unhealthy endpoint must pass the same number of checks to be considered healthy. For more information, see How Amazon Route 53 Determines Whether an Endpoint Is Healthy.

  • Health check request interval: You can now specify how frequently Amazon Route 53 sends requests to an endpoint to determine whether the endpoint is healthy. Valid settings are 10 seconds and 30 seconds. For more information, see How Amazon Route 53 Determines Whether an Endpoint Is Healthy.

January 30, 2014

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds the following features:

  • HTTP and HTTPS string-match health checks: Amazon Route 53 now supports health checks that determine the health of an endpoint based on the appearance of a specified string in the response body. For more information, see How Amazon Route 53 Determines Whether an Endpoint Is Healthy.

  • HTTPS health checks: Amazon Route 53 now supports health checks for secure, SSL-only websites. For more information, see How Amazon Route 53 Determines Whether an Endpoint Is Healthy.

  • UPSERT for the ChangeResourceRecordSets API Action: When creating or changing resource record sets using the ChangeResourceRecordSets API action, you can now use the UPSERT action either to create a new resource record set if none exists with a given name and type, or to update an existing resource record set. For more information, see ChangeResourceRecordSets in the Amazon Route 53 API Reference.

January 7, 2014

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for health checks that determine the health of an endpoint based on whether a specified string appears in the response body. For more information, see How Amazon Route 53 Determines Whether an Endpoint Is Healthy.

2013 Releases

August 14, 2013

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for creating resource record sets by importing a BIND-formatted zone file. For more information, see Creating Resource Record Sets By Importing a Zone File.

In addition, CloudWatch metrics for Amazon Route 53 health checks have been integrated into the Amazon Route 53 console and streamlined. For more information, see Monitoring Health Checks Using CloudWatch.

June 26, 2013

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for integrating health checks with CloudWatch metrics so you can do the following:

  • Verify that a health check is properly configured.

  • Review the health of a health check endpoint over a specified period of time.

  • Configure CloudWatch to send an Amazon Simple Notification Service (Amazon SNS) alert when all Amazon Route 53 health checkers consider your specified endpoint to be unhealthy.

For more information, see Monitoring Health Checks Using CloudWatch.

June 11, 2013

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for creating alias resource record sets that route DNS queries to alternate domain names for Amazon CloudFront distributions. You can use this feature both for alternate domain names at the zone apex (example.com) and alternate domain names for subdomains (www.example.com). For more information, see Routing Traffic to an Amazon CloudFront Web Distribution by Using Your Domain Name.

May 30, 2013

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for evaluating the health of ELB load balancers and the associated Amazon EC2 instances. For more information, see Creating Amazon Route 53 Health Checks and Configuring DNS Failover.

March 28, 2013

The documentation about health checks and failover was rewritten to enhance usability. For more information, see Creating Amazon Route 53 Health Checks and Configuring DNS Failover.

February 11, 2013

With this release, Amazon Route 53 adds support for failover and health checks. For more information, see Creating Amazon Route 53 Health Checks and Configuring DNS Failover.

2012 Release

March 21, 2012

With this release, Amazon Route 53 lets you create latency resource record sets. For more information, see Latency-based Routing.

2011 Releases

December 21, 2011

With this release, the Amazon Route 53 console in the AWS Management Console lets you create an alias resource record set by choosing an Elastic Load Balancer from a list instead of manually entering the hosted zone ID and the DNS name of the load balancer. New functionality is documented in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide.

November 16, 2011

With this release, you can use the Amazon Route 53 console in the AWS Management Console to create and delete hosted zones, and to create, change, and delete resource record sets. New functionality is documented throughout the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide, as applicable.

October 18, 2011

The Amazon Route 53 Getting Started Guide was merged into the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide, and the Developer Guide was reorganized to enhance usability.

May 24, 2011

This release of Amazon Route 53 introduces alias resource record sets, which allow you to create zone apex aliases; weighted resource record sets; a new API (2011-05-05); and a service-level agreement. In addition, after six months in beta, Amazon Route 53 is now generally available. For more information, see the Amazon Route 53 product page and Choosing Between Alias and Non-Alias Resource Record Sets in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide.

2010 Release

December 5, 2010

This is the first release of Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide.