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Amazon Route 53
Developer Guide (API Version 2013-04-01)

I changed DNS settings, but they haven't taken effect

If you changed DNS settings, here are some common reasons that the changes haven't taken effect yet.

You transferred DNS service to Amazon Route 53 in the last 48 hours, so DNS is still using your previous DNS service

When you transferred DNS service to Amazon Route 53, you used the method provided by the registrar for your domain to replace the name servers for the previous DNS service with the four name servers for Amazon Route 53.

Domain registrars typically use a TTL (time to live) of 24 to 48 hours for name servers. This means that when a DNS resolver gets the name servers for your domain, it uses that information for up to 48 hours before it submits another request for the current name servers for the domain. If you transferred DNS service to Amazon Route 53 in the last 48 hours and then changed DNS settings, some DNS resolvers are still using your old DNS service to route traffic for the domain.

You recently transferred DNS service to Amazon Route 53, but you didn't update the name servers with the domain registrar

The registrar for your domain has a variety of information about the domain, including the name servers for the DNS service for the domain. Typically, the domain registrar is also your DNS service, so the name servers that are associated with your domain belong to the registrar. These name servers tell DNS where to get information about how you want traffic for your domain to be routed, for example, to the IP address of a web server for your domain.

When you transfer DNS service to Amazon Route 53, you need to use the method that is provided by your domain registrar to change the name servers that are associated with your domain. You're usually replacing the name servers that are provided by the registrar with the four Amazon Route 53 name servers that are associated with the hosted zone that you created for the domain.

If you created a new hosted zone and resource record sets for your domain and specified different settings than you used for the previous DNS service, and if DNS is still routing traffic to the old resources, it's possible that you didn't update the name servers with the domain registrar. To determine whether the registrar is using the name servers for your Amazon Route 53 hosted zone and, if necessary, to update the name servers for the domain, perform the following procedure:

To get the name servers for your hosted zone and update the name server setting with the domain registrar

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon Route 53 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/route53/.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Hosted Zones.

  3. On the Hosted Zones page, choose the radio button (not the name) for the hosted zone.

    Important

    If you have more than one hosted zone with the same name, make sure you're getting the name servers for the correct hosted zone.

  4. In the right pane, make note of the four servers listed for Name Servers.

  5. Using the method provided by the registrar for the domain, display the list of name servers for the domain.

  6. If the name servers for the domain match the name servers that you got in step 4, then the domain configuration is correct.

    If the name servers for the domain don't match the name servers that you got in step 4, update the domain to use the Amazon Route 53 name servers.

Important

When you change the name servers for the domain to the name servers from your Amazon Route 53 hosted zone, it can take up to two days for the change to take effect and for Amazon Route 53 to become your DNS service. This is because DNS resolvers across the Internet typically request the name servers only once every two days and cache the answer.

DNS resolvers still are using the old settings for the resource record set

If you changed the settings in a resource record set but your traffic is still being routed to the old resource, such as a web server for your website, one possible cause is that DNS still has the previous settings cached. Each resource record set has a TTL (time to live) value that specifies how long, in seconds, that you want DNS resolvers to cache the information in the resource record set, such as the IP address for a web server. Until the amount of time that is specified by the TTL passes, DNS resolvers will continue to return the old value in response to DNS queries. If you want to know what the TTL is for a resource record set, perform the following procedure.

Note

For alias resource record sets, the TTL is determined by the AWS resource that the resource record set routes traffic to. For more information, see Choosing Between Alias and Non-Alias Resource Record Sets.

To view the TTL for a resource record set

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon Route 53 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/route53/.

  2. On the Hosted Zones page, choose the name of the hosted zone that includes the resource record set.

  3. In the list of resource record sets, find the resource record set that you want the TTL value for, and check the value of the TTL column.

    Note

    Changing the TTL now won't make your change take effect faster. DNS resolvers already have the value cached, and they won't get the new setting until the amount of time that was specified by the old setting passes.