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Amazon AppStream
Developer Guide

This documentation is for an older version of Amazon AppStream. For information about the latest version, see the Amazon AppStream 2.0 Developer Guide.

Product Updates

Release for May 14, 2015 (Latest)

This release includes the following changes:

New client application for Android and Fire OS devices

You can use a device running Android or Fire OS to connect to a streaming application with the new Amazon AppStream Example Client. This client application enables an Android or Fire OS device to connect to a streaming application in test mode or through an entitlement service.

Learn more at Android and Fire OS.

New client application for iOS devices

You can use a device running iOS to connect to a streaming application with the new Basic AppStream Client. This client application enables an iOS device to connect to a streaming application in test mode or through an entitlement service.

Learn more at iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch.

Connect to a streaming application in one click

You can connect to a streaming application in one click through the Chrome browser or devices that use Android, Fire OS, and iOS. To do this, use a URL in a deep link format.

Learn how to construct this URL at Streaming your Application in One Click.

Release for March 26, 2015

This release includes the following changes:

Updates to the Amazon AppStream Chrome App SDK and Chrome App

The Amazon AppStream Chrome App SDK was updated to use the Chrome video decoder instead of FFmpeg video decoder. The Chrome App has a Settings dialog box that allows you to use the mouse input of the Chrome App, the streaming application or both the Chrome App and streaming application, show verbose debugging information to help you solve a problem, and change the inactivity time.

Download the latest Amazon AppStream Chrome App SDK from https://s3.amazonaws.com/appstream-sdk/AppStream_Chrome_SDK-1.2.1.189.zip. The latest Chrome App is available from the Google Play Store.

Display the mouse pointers

Because your users interact with your streaming application using a client application and your streaming application runs on Amazon AppStream, you have two mouse pointers to consider. You can control which mouse pointers to display on the client applications.

Learn more at Displaying Mouse Pointers.

Release for February 2, 2015

This release includes the following changes:

You can connect to an entitlement service from a Chrome browser by using a special URL called a deep link. When you use this URL, the Chrome browser connects the Chrome app to your streaming application through an entitlement service.

Learn more at Streaming your Application in One Click.

New deployment wizards

You can deploy your streaming application by using the interactive or the advanced deployment wizards. The wizard you use depends on your browser and the type of application installer.

Learn more at Deploying Your Streaming Application to Amazon AppStream

Release for November 20, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Revised deployment from the console

The Amazon AppStream console has been revised to simplify the deployment process. We also removed the requirements for an presigned URL to an S3 bucket and to use a silent installer to deploy your streaming application.

Learn more at Getting Started with Amazon AppStream.

After you deploy your streaming application, you can start streaming by using a quick link to connect a client application to your streaming application.

Learn more at Generating a New Test Connect Link to Stream Your Application.

Release for September 30, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Amazon AppStream now available in Asia Pacific (Tokyo) region

Developers who cater to users in Asia Pacific can now offer lower latencies to their users by streaming their applications from the AWS data center in Tokyo. A localized version of the Amazon AppStream Developer Guide is also available.

Sample entitlement service template updated for use in multiple regions

The sample entitlement service has been updated to access applications from any region. You can download the latest sample entitlement service template from Downloads.

Release for September 16, 2014

This release includes the following change:

Support for Chromebooks and Chrome browsers

The Amazon AppStream Chrome App SDK is now available to support streaming applications on Chromebooks and Chrome web browsers on Mac, Windows, and Linux desktops. An example Amazon AppStream Chrome App is available from the Chrome Web Store, and can be customized with HTML, JS, and CSS using the SDK available from Downloads.

Learn more about this new client application at Building a Chrome App.

Release for August 22, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Simplified sample entitlement service deployment

Deploying the sample entitlement service is now simpler. Learn more about deploying the sample entitlement service at Amazon AppStream Sample Entitlement Service.

Password requirements for standalone mode

Standalone mode has new password requirements including specific requirements for the DeveloperPassword and the TightVNC passwords.

Release for August 5, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Android client application updates

  • The client application can connect to multiple streaming applications without restarting the client application. In the previous version, you had to restart the client application before connecting to another streaming application.

  • The client application adjusts the volume on the device instead of sending a command to the streaming application to adjust the volume.

  • We added support for joysticks.

  • The client application displays error and connection information in a more unified manner with the other client applications.

iOS client application updates

  • The client application can connect to multiple streaming applications without restarting the client application. In the previous version, you had to restart the client application before connecting to another streaming application.

  • The client application displays error and connection information in a more unified manner with the other client applications.

OS X client application updates

  • The client application can connect to multiple streaming applications without restarting the client application. In the previous version, you had to restart the client application before connecting to another streaming application.

  • The client application displays error and connection information in a more unified manner with the other client applications.

Windows client application updates

  • We added support for the middle mouse button.

Other Updates

  • We fixed an issue that prevented the source code for the Windows example client application from being compiled.

Release for June 20, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Up to 20% performance improvement on 64-bit iOS devices

We added support for ARM64 which improves the performance on 64-bit iOS devices by up to 20%. If you are updating an existing iOS client application, you should use the new libXStxClient.a file and update the <SDK_dir>/3rdparty folder to the version in the SDK and set Architectures in your project Build Settings to $(ARCHS_STANDARD) to include ARM64 support.

Simplified sample streaming application code

The code for the sample streaming application has been simplified to under 600 lines, down from more than 2,000 lines. The SDK also contains a Visual Studio solution file so you just need Visual Studio 2010 or later to compile the code. In the previous SDK version, you needed both CMake for Windows and Visual Studio to compile the code.

Remote debugging in standalone mode

You can debug your streaming application running in Amazon AppStream standalone mode by using Remote Tools for Visual Studio on your Amazon EC2 instance. Learn more about remote debugging in standalone mode at Debugging Your Streaming Application in Amazon AppStream Standalone Mode.

Other Updates

  • We fixed an issue where an invalid path specified in the log page prevents the next step in the console even if logging was not specified.

Release for May 30, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Utilization Log is in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)

Amazon AppStream now uses UTC time instead of epoch time in the utilization log. The UTC time allows better coordination and consistency between other AWS services and Amazon AppStream.

Utilization Log Contains GPU Metrics

You can now see GPU metrics in the utilization log when you select logging for your streaming application. The utilization log contains GPU metrics, such as memory information, power utilization, and temperature to help you monitor and diagnose your streaming application.

Learn more about the GPU metrics at Enabling Logging on a Streaming Application.

Simplified the Application Resource Properties

The applicationManifest property is no longer in the Application resource. The properties within applicationManifest property are now in the Application properties.

This change simplifies the Application resource structure.

Other Updates

  • The latency rate is now equal or better than the previous SDK release. Some customers experienced increased latency rates after using the previous SDK release.

  • The example Android client application no longer hangs on exit.

  • Bandwidth adaptation is improved when the frame rate varies.

Release for May 9, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Logging for Utilization Metrics

You can now see utilization metrics in the logs when you select logging for your streaming application. This comma-separated value file contains operational metrics, such as CPU utilization, memory information, and disk read and write speeds.

Learn more about the utilization metrics at Enabling Logging on a Streaming Application.

YUV444 Color Subsampling Support

Amazon AppStream now supports streaming video to client applications and devices at the YUV444 color subsampling rate. If your streaming application, client application, and devices support YUV444, you can specify this higher rate in your streaming application.

Learn more about YUV444 at Streaming Video to a Client.

Other Updates

  • Amazon AppStream now has less server overhead, giving more CPU resources to streaming applications and improving performance.

  • The Amazon AppStream console Summary page now has a link to the Amazon S3 bucket that stores your log file.

  • Amazon AppStream now creates a log file when the streaming application unexpectedly stops. In the previous version, a log file was not created after the streaming application stops.

  • The Amazon AppStream console features improved text.

Release for April 22, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Standard and User-defined Logging

You can configure your streaming application to save standard and user-defined logs to an Amazon S3 bucket. When the streaming application terminates, Amazon AppStream collects the logs into a .zip file and then uploads this file to your own bucket or to a bucket that Amazon AppStream creates.

Learn more about the logging feature at Enabling Logging on a Streaming Application.

Updated OpenSSL Version

We updated the OpenSSL cryptography library in Amazon AppStream to a version that fixes the Heartbleed security bug.

Other Updates

  • We now report an error if the application installer fails in the middle of the process. Previously, we did not report an error when this condition occurs.

Release for March 28, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

New Billing Practice

Your bill now includes session time up to the point when your streaming application unexpectedly terminates. Previously, your bill did not include any session in which your streaming application unexpectedly terminated.

SDK Version Detected from the Files instead of the Registry

The version of the Amazon AppStream SDK that you use is based on the files rather than a registry setting. This change ensures that Amazon AppStream implements the correct version for your streaming application.

Other Updates

  • The Cancel button on the console now takes you to the Welcome page.

Release for March 7, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Amazon AppStream Is Available to Anyone with an AWS Account

During Limited Preview, only a limited number of users had access to Amazon AppStream. Now allow anyone with an AWS account can try Amazon AppStream.

Improved Deployment Error Messages

Error messages now display the reason why a deployment failed. The error messages are documented in Error Codes.

Example Client Application for Mac OS X

The Amazon AppStream SDK now includes a precompiled client application and the source code to build your own client application for Mac OS X.

Learn more about creating a sample application client in Building a Client for OS X.

Increase Your Service Limits

By default, you can have up to ten simultaneous sessions connect to your streaming application. When you want your streaming application to accept more simultaneous sessions, you can request to increase the service limit.

Learn more about increasing your service limits at Increasing Your Amazon AppStream Service Limits.

Other Updates

  • When you delete a streaming application from the Streaming Application page, it no longer appears there. Previously, a deleted streaming application remained in the Streaming Application page with a Deleted status.

  • Amazon AppStream displays an improved error message it cannot access the presigned Amazon S3 URL to the application installer. Previously, Amazon AppStream displayed a generic error message that did not define the problem.

  • The Amazon AppStream console now correctly displays the launcher command.

  • Amazon AppStream now displays an error if the streaming application stops after the client connects. Previously, this condition did not trigger and error message.

Release for February 14, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Improved Deployment Experience

The Amazon AppStream console now displays a review page that shows your settings prior to deployment. On this page you can change the settings before deployment so that your streaming application will start correctly.

Silent Installer Requirement

To install your streaming application, you need to create an installer that installs your streaming application and dependency files without any user intervention.

Other Updates

  • Amazon AppStream displays an error message if the application installer you uploaded to the Amazon S3 bucket does not comply with the requirements.

  • A race condition no longer results from errors thrown by the GetEntitlement function.

Release for January 24, 2014

This release includes the following changes:

Single Download for the Amazon AppStream SDK

All of the different SDK packages are now available as a single downloadable package that contains the libraries for your Windows streaming application and your Android, iOS, and Windows client applications. Previously, you had to download a package for the Windows sample streaming application and client application, a package for the Android client application, and another package for the iOS client application.

Learn more at Downloads.

Improved Console Load Time

The Amazon AppStream console now loads 45% faster than the previous version. The faster load time means faster deployment for your streaming application.

Support for Android Hardware Decoding

Amazon AppStream now supports hardware decoding for 2013 or later Android devices that use the Qualcomm processor, such as the Amazon Kindle and Google Nexus. The hardware decoder support means more consistent streaming performance over using the software decoder.

Other Updates

  • Amazon AppStream terminates the Amazon EC2 instances if the application installer did not completely install the streaming application. Previously, the EC2 instance would start and run even if the application installer could not complete the installation.

  • Error messages now follow the style of error messages in other AWS services.

  • You can now register a streaming application reactivated from an archived state.

  • The Amazon AppStream console now features separate text boxes for the launch parameters and the path to the launcher to prevent application installer error. Previously, you entered the launch parameters and path to the launcher in the same text box.

  • Amazon AppStream now allows an instance to run even if the instance is in pre-production mode.