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AWS Billing and Cost Management
User Guide (Version 2.0)

Consolidated Billing Non-usage Charges

Important

Consolidated billing is now a feature of AWS Organizations. The information provided in the Billing and Cost Management documentation might be out of date. For current information about consolidated billing, see Consolidated Billing and AWS Organizations in the AWS Organizations User Guide.

There are a few other things to know about how consolidated billing works with other parts of AWS.

Amazon EC2 Reserved Instances

For billing purposes, Consolidated Billing treats all the accounts on the consolidated bill as one account. This means that all accounts on a consolidated bill can receive the hourly cost benefit of Amazon EC2 Reserved Instances purchased by any other account.

For example, Bob and Susan each have an account on Bob's consolidated bill. Susan has 5 Reserved Instances of the same type, and Bob has none. During one particular hour, Susan uses 3 instances and Bob uses 6, for a total of 9 instances used on Bob's consolidated bill. We bill 5 as Reserved Instances, and the remaining 4 as normal instances.

Let's say the Reserved Instances cost $0.02 per instance-hour. For these instances, we charge 5 x $0.02 = $0.10.

Let's say the normal Amazon EC2 rate is $0.10 per instance-hour. For the remaining 4 instances, we charge 4 x $0.10 = $0.40.

So, the total amount Bob is charged for the 9 instances is $0.10 + $0.40 = $0.50. If we hadn't applied the cost benefit of Susan's 5 Reserved Instances to the 9 instances on Bob's consolidated bill, he would have instead paid $0.66 total.

In terms of cost attribution, we attribute a dollar amount to Bob and Susan based on each person's usage. Susan used 3 of the 9 instances (one-third), and Bob used 6 (two-thirds). Therefore on the bill, one-third of the $0.50 is attributed to Susan, and the other two-thirds is attributed to Bob.

Bob receives the cost benefit from Susan's Reserved Instances only if he launches his instances in the Availability Zone where Susan purchased her Reserved Instances. For example, if Susan specified us-west-2a when she purchased her Reserved Instances, Bob must specify us-west-2a when he launches his instances in order to get the cost benefit on his consolidated bill. However, the actual locations of Availability Zones are independent from one account to another. For example, the us-west-2a Availability Zone for Bob's account might be in a different location than for Susan's account.

Amazon RDS Reserved DB Instances

For billing purposes, Amazon RDS Reserved DB Instances are treated in a manner similar to Amazon EC2 Reserved Instances. For example, let's use a scenario that's like the one described previously, where Bob and Susan each have an account on Bob's consolidated bill. Susan has 5 Reserved DB Instances, and Bob has none. During one particular hour, Susan uses 3 DB Instances and Bob uses 6, for a total of 9 DB Instances used on Bob's consolidated bill. We bill 5 as Reserved DB Instances, and the remaining 4 as On-Demand DB Instances (for Amazon RDS Reserved DB Instance charges, go to the pricing page). Bob receives the cost benefit from Susan's Reserved DB Instances only if he launches his DB Instances in the same region where Susan purchased her Reserved DB Instances.

Also, all the attributes of Susan's Reserved DB Instances (DB Engine, DB Instance class, Deployment type, and License Model) should match the attributes of the DB Instances launched by Bob. For example, let's say Susan purchased a Reserved DB Instance in us-west-2a with the following attributes:

  • DB Engine: MySQL

  • DB Instance Class: m1.xlarge

  • Deployment Type: Multi-AZ

  • License Model: General Public License

This means that Bob must launch his DB Instances in us-west-2a with the exact same attributes in order to get the cost benefit on his consolidated bill.

AWS Credits

AWS credits are credits that you can apply to your account to cover the costs associated with eligible AWS services. AWS applies the credits to your bill until the credits are exhausted or expire. For more information about eligible services, see Redeem Your AWS Promotional Credit .

To give the owner of the payer account owner the lowest bill, any AWS credits redeemed by the payer and linked accounts are applied to the consolidated bill. Credits can apply to only one account per billing cycle. The following rules determine which account AWS credits are applied to:

  • If the credits are redeemed during a billing period, for that billing period the credits are applied to the bill that belongs to the account that was paying when the credits were redeemed. If the credits are redeemed while the account is a single account, the credits are applied to the single account bill for that billing period. If the credits are redeemed while the account is part of a consolidated family, the credits are applied to the consolidated bill for that billing period.

  • If the credits were redeemed before a billing period starts, the credits are applied to the bill that belongs to the account that was paying at the beginning of the billing period.

For example, if Susan redeems 100 dollars of credit on January 1 and joins Bob's consolidated billing family on January 15, Susan's credits are applied to her account for the usage incurred from Jan 1 through January 15. From February onwards, Susan's credits are applied to Bob's consolidated bill. If Susan has 50 dollars of credit and unlinks from Bob's consolidated billing family on April 16, Susan's credits are applied to Bob's consolidated bill for April. From May onwards, Susan's credits are applied to Susan's account.

AWS Support Charges for Consolidated Billing Accounts

AWS calculates AWS Support fees independently for each linked account. An AWS Support subscription for the payer account does not apply to the entire account family. Each account must subscribe independently.

Likewise, any AWS Support fees associated with Reserved Instance purchases apply only to the individual accounts that made the purchase.