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AWS Billing and Cost Management
User Guide (Version 2.0)

Billing Examples for Specific Services

There are a few other things to know about how consolidated billing works with specific services in AWS.

Amazon EC2 Reserved Instances

For the Amazon EC2 Reserved Instances example, suppose that Bob and Susan each have an account in an organization. Susan has five Reserved Instances of the same type, and Bob has none. During one particular hour, Susan uses three instances and Bob uses six, for a total of nine instances on the organization's consolidated bill. AWS bills five instances as Reserved Instances, and the remaining four instances as regular instances.

Bob receives the cost benefit from Susan's Reserved Instances only if he launches his instances in the same Availability Zone where Susan purchased her Reserved Instances. For example, if Susan specified us-west-2a when she purchased her Reserved Instances, Bob must specify us-west-2a when he launches his instances to get the cost benefit on the organization's consolidated bill. However, the actual locations of Availability Zones are independent from one account to another. For example, the us-west-2a Availability Zone for Bob's account might be in a different location than for Susan's account.

Amazon RDS Reserved DB Instances

For the Amazon RDS Reserved DB Instances example, let's use a scenario that's like the one described previously, where Bob and Susan each have an account in an organization. Susan has five Reserved DB Instances, and Bob has none. During one particular hour, Susan uses three DB Instances and Bob uses six, for a total of nine DB Instances used on the consolidated bill. AWS bills five as Reserved DB Instances, and the remaining four as On-Demand DB Instances (for Amazon RDS Reserved DB Instance charges, see the pricing page). Bob receives the cost benefit from Susan's Reserved DB Instances only if he launches his DB Instances in the same region where Susan purchased her Reserved DB Instances.

Also, all the attributes of Susan's Reserved DB Instances (DB Engine, DB Instance class, Deployment type, and License Model) should match the attributes of the DB Instances launched by Bob. For example, let's say Susan purchased a Reserved DB Instance in us-west-2a with the following attributes:

  • DB Engine: MySQL

  • DB Instance Class: m1.xlarge

  • Deployment Type: Multi-AZ

  • License Model: General Public License

This means that Bob must launch his DB Instances in us-west-2a with the exact same attributes to get the cost benefit on the organization's consolidated bill.

Amazon ElastiCache Reserved Node Instances

For the Amazon ElastiCache Reserved Nodes example, suppose Bob and Susan each have an account in an organization. Susan has five Reserved Nodes, and Bob has none. During one particular hour, Susan uses three nodes and Bob uses six. This makes a total of nine nodes used on the consolidated bill.

AWS bills five as Reserved Nodes. AWS bills the remaining four as On-Demand nodes. (For Amazon ElastiCache Reserved Nodes charges, see Amazon ElastiCache Pricing.) Bob receives the cost benefit from Susan's Reserved Nodes only if he launches his On-Demand nodes in the same region where Susan purchased her Reserved Nodes.

Also, to receive the cost benefit of Susan’s Reserved Nodes, all attributes of Bob's nodes must match the attributes of the nodes launched by Susan. For example, let's say Susan purchased Reserved Nodes in us-west-2 with the following attributes:

  • Cache engine: Redis

  • Node type: cache.r3.large

Bob must launch his ElastiCache nodes in us-west-2 with the same attributes to get the cost benefit on the organization's consolidated bill.