AWS Tools for Windows PowerShell
Command Reference

AWS services or capabilities described in AWS Documentation may vary by region/location. Click Getting Started with Amazon AWS to see specific differences applicable to the China (Beijing) Region.

Synopsis

Invokes the PostText operation against Amazon Lex.

Syntax

Send-LEXText
-InputText <String>
-BotAlias <String>
-BotName <String>
-SessionAttribute <Hashtable>
-UserId <String>

Description

Sends user input (text-only) to Amazon Lex. Client applications can use this API to send requests to Amazon Lex at runtime. Amazon Lex then interprets the user input using the machine learning model it built for the bot. In response, Amazon Lex returns the next message to convey to the user an optional responseCard to display. Consider the following example messages:
  • For a user input "I would like a pizza", Amazon Lex might return a response with a message eliciting slot data (for example, PizzaSize): "What size pizza would you like?"
  • After the user provides all of the pizza order information, Amazon Lex might return a response with a message to obtain user confirmation "Proceed with the pizza order?".
  • After the user replies to a confirmation prompt with a "yes", Amazon Lex might return a conclusion statement: "Thank you, your cheese pizza has been ordered.".
Not all Amazon Lex messages require a user response. For example, a conclusion statement does not require a response. Some messages require only a "yes" or "no" user response. In addition to the message, Amazon Lex provides additional context about the message in the response that you might use to enhance client behavior, for example, to display the appropriate client user interface. These are the slotToElicit, dialogState, intentName, and slots fields in the response. Consider the following examples:
  • If the message is to elicit slot data, Amazon Lex returns the following context information:
    • dialogState set to ElicitSlot
    • intentName set to the intent name in the current context
    • slotToElicit set to the slot name for which the message is eliciting information
    • slots set to a map of slots, configured for the intent, with currently known values
  • If the message is a confirmation prompt, the dialogState is set to ConfirmIntent and SlotToElicit is set to null.
  • If the message is a clarification prompt (configured for the intent) that indicates that user intent is not understood, the dialogState is set to ElicitIntent and slotToElicit is set to null.
In addition, Amazon Lex also returns your application-specific sessionAttributes. For more information, see Managing Conversation Context.

Parameters

-BotAlias <String>
The alias of the Amazon Lex bot.
Required?False
Position?Named
Accept pipeline input?False
-BotName <String>
The name of the Amazon Lex bot.
Required?False
Position?Named
Accept pipeline input?False
-InputText <String>
The text that the user entered (Amazon Lex interprets this text).
Required?False
Position?1
Accept pipeline input?True (ByValue, )
-SessionAttribute <Hashtable>
By using session attributes, a client application can pass contextual information in the request to Amazon Lex For example,
  • In Getting Started Exercise 1, the example bot uses the price session attribute to maintain the price of the flowers ordered (for example, "Price":25). The code hook (the Lambda function) sets this attribute based on the type of flowers ordered. For more information, see Review the Details of Information Flow.
  • In the BookTrip bot exercise, the bot uses the currentReservation session attribute to maintain slot data during the in-progress conversation to book a hotel or book a car. For more information, see Details of Information Flow.
  • You might use the session attributes (key, value pairs) to track the requestID of user requests.
Amazon Lex simply passes these session attributes to the Lambda functions configured for the intent.In your Lambda function, you can also use the session attributes for initialization and customization (prompts and response cards). Some examples are:
  • Initialization - In a pizza ordering bot, if you can pass the user location as a session attribute (for example, "Location" : "111 Maple street"), then your Lambda function might use this information to determine the closest pizzeria to place the order (perhaps to set the storeAddress slot value).
  • Personalize prompts - For example, you can configure prompts to refer to the user name. (For example, "Hey [FirstName], what toppings would you like?"). You can pass the user name as a session attribute ("FirstName" : "Joe") so that Amazon Lex can substitute the placeholder to provide a personalize prompt to the user ("Hey Joe, what toppings would you like?").
Amazon Lex does not persist session attributes. If you configure a code hook for the intent, Amazon Lex passes the incoming session attributes to the Lambda function. If you want Amazon Lex to return these session attributes back to the client, the Lambda function must return them. If there is no code hook configured for the intent, Amazon Lex simply returns the session attributes back to the client application.
Required?False
Position?Named
Accept pipeline input?False
-UserId <String>
The ID of the client application user. The application developer decides the user IDs. At runtime, each request must include the user ID. Typically, each of your application users should have a unique ID. Note the following considerations:
  • If you want a user to start a conversation on one device and continue the conversation on another device, you might choose a user-specific identifier, such as a login or Amazon Cognito user ID (assuming your application is using Amazon Cognito).
  • If you want the same user to be able to have two independent conversations on two different devices, you might choose a device-specific identifier, such as device ID, or some globally unique identifier.
Required?False
Position?Named
Accept pipeline input?False

Common Credential and Region Parameters

-AccessKey <String>
The AWS access key for the user account. This can be a temporary access key if the corresponding session token is supplied to the -SessionToken parameter.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-Credential <AWSCredentials>
An AWSCredentials object instance containing access and secret key information, and optionally a token for session-based credentials.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-ProfileLocation <String>

Used to specify the name and location of the ini-format credential file (shared with the AWS CLI and other AWS SDKs)

If this optional parameter is omitted this cmdlet will search the encrypted credential file used by the AWS SDK for .NET and AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio first. If the profile is not found then the cmdlet will search in the ini-format credential file at the default location: (user's home directory)\.aws\credentials. Note that the encrypted credential file is not supported on all platforms. It will be skipped when searching for profiles on Windows Nano Server, Mac, and Linux platforms.

If this parameter is specified then this cmdlet will only search the ini-format credential file at the location given.

As the current folder can vary in a shell or during script execution it is advised that you use specify a fully qualified path instead of a relative path.

Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-ProfileName <String>
The user-defined name of an AWS credentials or SAML-based role profile containing credential information. The profile is expected to be found in the secure credential file shared with the AWS SDK for .NET and AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio. You can also specify the name of a profile stored in the .ini-format credential file used with the AWS CLI and other AWS SDKs.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-NetworkCredential <PSCredential>
Used with SAML-based authentication when ProfileName references a SAML role profile. Contains the network credentials to be supplied during authentication with the configured identity provider's endpoint. This parameter is not required if the user's default network identity can or should be used during authentication.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-SecretKey <String>
The AWS secret key for the user account. This can be a temporary secret key if the corresponding session token is supplied to the -SessionToken parameter.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-SessionToken <String>
The session token if the access and secret keys are temporary session-based credentials.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-Region <String>
The system name of the AWS region in which the operation should be invoked. For example, us-east-1, eu-west-1 etc.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-EndpointUrl <String>

The endpoint to make the call against.

Note: This parameter is primarily for internal AWS use and is not required/should not be specified for normal usage. The cmdlets normally determine which endpoint to call based on the region specified to the -Region parameter or set as default in the shell (via Set-DefaultAWSRegion). Only specify this parameter if you must direct the call to a specific custom endpoint.

Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False

Inputs

You can pipe a String object to this cmdlet for the InputText parameter.

Outputs

This cmdlet returns a Amazon.Lex.Model.PostTextResponse object containing multiple properties. The object can also be referenced from properties attached to the cmdlet entry in the $AWSHistory stack.

Supported Version

AWS Tools for PowerShell: 2.x.y.z