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Class: Aws::Lex::Client

Inherits:
Seahorse::Client::Base show all
Defined in:
(unknown)

Overview

An API client for Amazon Lex Runtime Service. To construct a client, you need to configure a :region and :credentials.

lex = Aws::Lex::Client.new(
  region: region_name,
  credentials: credentials,
  # ...
)

See #initialize for a full list of supported configuration options.

Region

You can configure a default region in the following locations:

  • ENV['AWS_REGION']
  • Aws.config[:region]

Go here for a list of supported regions.

Credentials

Default credentials are loaded automatically from the following locations:

  • ENV['AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID'] and ENV['AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY']
  • Aws.config[:credentials]
  • The shared credentials ini file at ~/.aws/credentials (more information)
  • From an instance profile when running on EC2

You can also construct a credentials object from one of the following classes:

Alternatively, you configure credentials with :access_key_id and :secret_access_key:

# load credentials from disk
creds = YAML.load(File.read('/path/to/secrets'))

Aws::Lex::Client.new(
  access_key_id: creds['access_key_id'],
  secret_access_key: creds['secret_access_key']
)

Always load your credentials from outside your application. Avoid configuring credentials statically and never commit them to source control.

Instance Attribute Summary

Attributes inherited from Seahorse::Client::Base

#config, #handlers

Constructor collapse

API Operations collapse

Instance Method Summary collapse

Methods inherited from Seahorse::Client::Base

add_plugin, api, #build_request, clear_plugins, define, new, #operation, #operation_names, plugins, remove_plugin, set_api, set_plugins

Methods included from Seahorse::Client::HandlerBuilder

#handle, #handle_request, #handle_response

Constructor Details

#initialize(options = {}) ⇒ Aws::Lex::Client

Constructs an API client.

Options Hash (options):

  • :access_key_id (String)

    Used to set credentials statically. See Plugins::RequestSigner for more details.

  • :convert_params (Boolean) — default: true

    When true, an attempt is made to coerce request parameters into the required types. See Plugins::ParamConverter for more details.

  • :credentials (required, Credentials)

    Your AWS credentials. The following locations will be searched in order for credentials:

    • :access_key_id, :secret_access_key, and :session_token options
    • ENV['AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID'], ENV['AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY']
    • HOME/.aws/credentials shared credentials file
    • EC2 instance profile credentials See Plugins::RequestSigner for more details.
  • :endpoint (String)

    A default endpoint is constructed from the :region. See Plugins::RegionalEndpoint for more details.

  • :http_continue_timeout (Float) — default: 1

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :http_idle_timeout (Integer) — default: 5

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :http_open_timeout (Integer) — default: 15

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :http_proxy (String)

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :http_read_timeout (Integer) — default: 60

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :http_wire_trace (Boolean) — default: false

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :log_level (Symbol) — default: :info

    The log level to send messages to the logger at. See Plugins::Logging for more details.

  • :log_formatter (Logging::LogFormatter)

    The log formatter. Defaults to Seahorse::Client::Logging::Formatter.default. See Plugins::Logging for more details.

  • :logger (Logger) — default: nil

    The Logger instance to send log messages to. If this option is not set, logging will be disabled. See Plugins::Logging for more details.

  • :profile (String)

    Used when loading credentials from the shared credentials file at HOME/.aws/credentials. When not specified, 'default' is used. See Plugins::RequestSigner for more details.

  • :raise_response_errors (Boolean) — default: true

    When true, response errors are raised. See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::RaiseResponseErrors for more details.

  • :region (required, String)

    The AWS region to connect to. The region is used to construct the client endpoint. Defaults to ENV['AWS_REGION']. Also checks AMAZON_REGION and AWS_DEFAULT_REGION. See Plugins::RegionalEndpoint for more details.

  • :retry_limit (Integer) — default: 3

    The maximum number of times to retry failed requests. Only ~ 500 level server errors and certain ~ 400 level client errors are retried. Generally, these are throttling errors, data checksum errors, networking errors, timeout errors and auth errors from expired credentials. See Plugins::RetryErrors for more details.

  • :secret_access_key (String)

    Used to set credentials statically. See Plugins::RequestSigner for more details.

  • :session_token (String)

    Used to set credentials statically. See Plugins::RequestSigner for more details.

  • :ssl_ca_bundle (String)

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :ssl_ca_directory (String)

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :ssl_ca_store (String)

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :ssl_verify_peer (Boolean) — default: true

    See Seahorse::Client::Plugins::NetHttp for more details.

  • :stub_responses (Boolean) — default: false

    Causes the client to return stubbed responses. By default fake responses are generated and returned. You can specify the response data to return or errors to raise by calling ClientStubs#stub_responses. See ClientStubs for more information.

    Please note When response stubbing is enabled, no HTTP requests are made, and retries are disabled. See Plugins::StubResponses for more details.

  • :validate_params (Boolean) — default: true

    When true, request parameters are validated before sending the request. See Plugins::ParamValidator for more details.

Instance Method Details

#post_content(options = {}) ⇒ Types::PostContentResponse

Sends user input (text or speech) to Amazon Lex. Clients use this API to send text and audio requests to Amazon Lex at runtime. Amazon Lex interprets the user input using the machine learning model that it built for the bot.

The PostContent operation supports audio input at 8kHz and 16kHz. You can use 8kHz audio to achieve higher speech recognition accuracy in telephone audio applications.

In response, Amazon Lex returns the next message to convey to the user. Consider the following example messages:

  • For a user input "I would like a pizza," Amazon Lex might return a response with a message eliciting slot data (for example, PizzaSize): "What size pizza would you like?".

  • After the user provides all of the pizza order information, Amazon Lex might return a response with a message to get user confirmation: "Order the pizza?".

  • After the user replies "Yes" to the confirmation prompt, Amazon Lex might return a conclusion statement: "Thank you, your cheese pizza has been ordered.".

Not all Amazon Lex messages require a response from the user. For example, conclusion statements do not require a response. Some messages require only a yes or no response. In addition to the message, Amazon Lex provides additional context about the message in the response that you can use to enhance client behavior, such as displaying the appropriate client user interface. Consider the following examples:

  • If the message is to elicit slot data, Amazon Lex returns the following context information:

    • x-amz-lex-dialog-state header set to ElicitSlot

    • x-amz-lex-intent-name header set to the intent name in the current context

    • x-amz-lex-slot-to-elicit header set to the slot name for which the message is eliciting information

    • x-amz-lex-slots header set to a map of slots configured for the intent with their current values

  • If the message is a confirmation prompt, the x-amz-lex-dialog-state header is set to Confirmation and the x-amz-lex-slot-to-elicit header is omitted.

  • If the message is a clarification prompt configured for the intent, indicating that the user intent is not understood, the x-amz-dialog-state header is set to ElicitIntent and the x-amz-slot-to-elicit header is omitted.

In addition, Amazon Lex also returns your application-specific sessionAttributes. For more information, see Managing Conversation Context.

Examples:

Request syntax with placeholder values


resp = client.post_content({
  response_target: "/path/to/file", # where to write response data, file path, or IO object
  bot_name: "BotName", # required
  bot_alias: "BotAlias", # required
  user_id: "UserId", # required
  session_attributes: "AttributesString",
  request_attributes: "AttributesString",
  content_type: "HttpContentType", # required
  accept: "Accept",
  input_stream: source_file, # file/IO object, or string data, required
})

Response structure


resp.content_type #=> String
resp.intent_name #=> String
resp.slots #=> String
resp.session_attributes #=> String
resp.message #=> String
resp.dialog_state #=> String, one of "ElicitIntent", "ConfirmIntent", "ElicitSlot", "Fulfilled", "ReadyForFulfillment", "Failed"
resp.slot_to_elicit #=> String
resp.input_transcript #=> String
resp.audio_stream #=> IO

Options Hash (options):

  • :response_target (IO, String)

    Specifies where to stream response data. You can provide the path where a file will be created on disk, or you can provide an IO object. If omitted, the response data will be loaded into memory and written to a StringIO object.

  • :bot_name (required, String)

    Name of the Amazon Lex bot.

  • :bot_alias (required, String)

    Alias of the Amazon Lex bot.

  • :user_id (required, String)

    The ID of the client application user. Amazon Lex uses this to identify a user\'s conversation with your bot. At runtime, each request must contain the userID field.

    To decide the user ID to use for your application, consider the following factors.

    • The userID field must not contain any personally identifiable information of the user, for example, name, personal identification numbers, or other end user personal information.

    • If you want a user to start a conversation on one device and continue on another device, use a user-specific identifier.

    • If you want the same user to be able to have two independent conversations on two different devices, choose a device-specific identifier.

    • A user can\'t have two independent conversations with two different versions of the same bot. For example, a user can\'t have a conversation with the PROD and BETA versions of the same bot. If you anticipate that a user will need to have conversation with two different versions, for example, while testing, include the bot alias in the user ID to separate the two conversations.

  • :session_attributes (String)

    SDK automatically handles json encoding and base64 encoding for you when the required value (Hash, Array, etc.) is provided according to the description. You pass this value as the x-amz-lex-session-attributes HTTP header.

    Application-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application. The value must be a JSON serialized and base64 encoded map with string keys and values. The total size of the sessionAttributes and requestAttributes headers is limited to 12 KB.

    For more information, see Setting Session Attributes.

  • :request_attributes (String)

    SDK automatically handles json encoding and base64 encoding for you when the required value (Hash, Array, etc.) is provided according to the description. You pass this value as the x-amz-lex-request-attributes HTTP header.

    Request-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application. The value must be a JSON serialized and base64 encoded map with string keys and values. The total size of the requestAttributes and sessionAttributes headers is limited to 12 KB.

    The namespace x-amz-lex: is reserved for special attributes. Don\'t create any request attributes with the prefix x-amz-lex:.

    For more information, see Setting Request Attributes.

  • :content_type (required, String)

    You pass this value as the Content-Type HTTP header.

    Indicates the audio format or text. The header value must start with one of the following prefixes:

    • PCM format, audio data must be in little-endian byte order.

      • audio/l16; rate=16000; channels=1

      • audio/x-l16; sample-rate=16000; channel-count=1

      • audio/lpcm; sample-rate=8000; sample-size-bits=16; channel-count=1; is-big-endian=false

    • Opus format

      • audio/x-cbr-opus-with-preamble; preamble-size=0; bit-rate=256000; frame-size-milliseconds=4

      ^

    • Text format

      • text/plain; charset=utf-8

      ^

  • :accept (String)

    You pass this value as the Accept HTTP header.

    The message Amazon Lex returns in the response can be either text or speech based on the Accept HTTP header value in the request.

    • If the value is text/plain; charset=utf-8, Amazon Lex returns text in the response.

    • If the value begins with audio/, Amazon Lex returns speech in the response. Amazon Lex uses Amazon Polly to generate the speech (using the configuration you specified in the Accept header). For example, if you specify audio/mpeg as the value, Amazon Lex returns speech in the MPEG format.

      The following are the accepted values:

      • audio/mpeg

      • audio/ogg

      • audio/pcm

      • text/plain; charset=utf-8

      • audio/* (defaults to mpeg)

  • :input_stream (required, IO, String)

    User input in PCM or Opus audio format or text format as described in the Content-Type HTTP header.

    You can stream audio data to Amazon Lex or you can create a local buffer that captures all of the audio data before sending. In general, you get better performance if you stream audio data rather than buffering the data locally.

Returns:

See Also:

#post_text(options = {}) ⇒ Types::PostTextResponse

Sends user input (text-only) to Amazon Lex. Client applications can use this API to send requests to Amazon Lex at runtime. Amazon Lex then interprets the user input using the machine learning model it built for the bot.

In response, Amazon Lex returns the next message to convey to the user an optional responseCard to display. Consider the following example messages:

  • For a user input "I would like a pizza", Amazon Lex might return a response with a message eliciting slot data (for example, PizzaSize): "What size pizza would you like?"

  • After the user provides all of the pizza order information, Amazon Lex might return a response with a message to obtain user confirmation "Proceed with the pizza order?".

  • After the user replies to a confirmation prompt with a "yes", Amazon Lex might return a conclusion statement: "Thank you, your cheese pizza has been ordered.".

Not all Amazon Lex messages require a user response. For example, a conclusion statement does not require a response. Some messages require only a "yes" or "no" user response. In addition to the message, Amazon Lex provides additional context about the message in the response that you might use to enhance client behavior, for example, to display the appropriate client user interface. These are the slotToElicit, dialogState, intentName, and slots fields in the response. Consider the following examples:

  • If the message is to elicit slot data, Amazon Lex returns the following context information:

    • dialogState set to ElicitSlot

    • intentName set to the intent name in the current context

    • slotToElicit set to the slot name for which the message is eliciting information

    • slots set to a map of slots, configured for the intent, with currently known values

  • If the message is a confirmation prompt, the dialogState is set to ConfirmIntent and SlotToElicit is set to null.

  • If the message is a clarification prompt (configured for the intent) that indicates that user intent is not understood, the dialogState is set to ElicitIntent and slotToElicit is set to null.

In addition, Amazon Lex also returns your application-specific sessionAttributes. For more information, see Managing Conversation Context.

Examples:

Request syntax with placeholder values


resp = client.post_text({
  bot_name: "BotName", # required
  bot_alias: "BotAlias", # required
  user_id: "UserId", # required
  session_attributes: {
    "String" => "String",
  },
  request_attributes: {
    "String" => "String",
  },
  input_text: "Text", # required
})

Response structure


resp.intent_name #=> String
resp.slots #=> Hash
resp.slots["String"] #=> String
resp.session_attributes #=> Hash
resp.session_attributes["String"] #=> String
resp.message #=> String
resp.dialog_state #=> String, one of "ElicitIntent", "ConfirmIntent", "ElicitSlot", "Fulfilled", "ReadyForFulfillment", "Failed"
resp.slot_to_elicit #=> String
resp.response_card.version #=> String
resp.response_card.content_type #=> String, one of "application/vnd.amazonaws.card.generic"
resp.response_card.generic_attachments #=> Array
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].title #=> String
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].sub_title #=> String
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].attachment_link_url #=> String
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].image_url #=> String
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].buttons #=> Array
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].buttons[0].text #=> String
resp.response_card.generic_attachments[0].buttons[0].value #=> String

Options Hash (options):

  • :bot_name (required, String)

    The name of the Amazon Lex bot.

  • :bot_alias (required, String)

    The alias of the Amazon Lex bot.

  • :user_id (required, String)

    The ID of the client application user. Amazon Lex uses this to identify a user\'s conversation with your bot. At runtime, each request must contain the userID field.

    To decide the user ID to use for your application, consider the following factors.

    • The userID field must not contain any personally identifiable information of the user, for example, name, personal identification numbers, or other end user personal information.

    • If you want a user to start a conversation on one device and continue on another device, use a user-specific identifier.

    • If you want the same user to be able to have two independent conversations on two different devices, choose a device-specific identifier.

    • A user can\'t have two independent conversations with two different versions of the same bot. For example, a user can\'t have a conversation with the PROD and BETA versions of the same bot. If you anticipate that a user will need to have conversation with two different versions, for example, while testing, include the bot alias in the user ID to separate the two conversations.

  • :session_attributes (Hash<String,String>)

    Application-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application.

    For more information, see Setting Session Attributes.

  • :request_attributes (Hash<String,String>)

    Request-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application.

    The namespace x-amz-lex: is reserved for special attributes. Don\'t create any request attributes with the prefix x-amz-lex:.

    For more information, see Setting Request Attributes.

  • :input_text (required, String)

    The text that the user entered (Amazon Lex interprets this text).

Returns:

See Also:

#wait_until(waiter_name, params = {}) {|waiter| ... } ⇒ Boolean

Waiters polls an API operation until a resource enters a desired state.

Basic Usage

Waiters will poll until they are succesful, they fail by entering a terminal state, or until a maximum number of attempts are made.

# polls in a loop, sleeping between attempts client.waiter_until(waiter_name, params)

Configuration

You can configure the maximum number of polling attempts, and the delay (in seconds) between each polling attempt. You configure waiters by passing a block to #wait_until:

# poll for ~25 seconds
client.wait_until(...) do |w|
  w.max_attempts = 5
  w.delay = 5
end

Callbacks

You can be notified before each polling attempt and before each delay. If you throw :success or :failure from these callbacks, it will terminate the waiter.

started_at = Time.now
client.wait_until(...) do |w|

  # disable max attempts
  w.max_attempts = nil

  # poll for 1 hour, instead of a number of attempts
  w.before_wait do |attempts, response|
    throw :failure if Time.now - started_at > 3600
  end

end

Handling Errors

When a waiter is successful, it returns true. When a waiter fails, it raises an error. All errors raised extend from Waiters::Errors::WaiterFailed.

begin
  client.wait_until(...)
rescue Aws::Waiters::Errors::WaiterFailed
  # resource did not enter the desired state in time
end

Parameters:

  • waiter_name (Symbol)

    The name of the waiter. See #waiter_names for a full list of supported waiters.

  • params (Hash) (defaults to: {})

    Additional request parameters. See the #waiter_names for a list of supported waiters and what request they call. The called request determines the list of accepted parameters.

Yield Parameters:

Returns:

  • (Boolean)

    Returns true if the waiter was successful.

Raises:

  • (Errors::FailureStateError)

    Raised when the waiter terminates because the waiter has entered a state that it will not transition out of, preventing success.

  • (Errors::TooManyAttemptsError)

    Raised when the configured maximum number of attempts have been made, and the waiter is not yet successful.

  • (Errors::UnexpectedError)

    Raised when an error is encounted while polling for a resource that is not expected.

  • (Errors::NoSuchWaiterError)

    Raised when you request to wait for an unknown state.

#waiter_namesArray<Symbol>

Returns the list of supported waiters. The following table lists the supported waiters and the client method they call:

Waiter NameClient MethodDefault Delay:Default Max Attempts:

Returns:

  • (Array<Symbol>)

    the list of supported waiters.