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Class STS

Security Token Service

Security Token Service (STS) enables you to request temporary, limited-privilege credentials for Identity and Access Management (IAM) users or for users that you authenticate (federated users). This guide provides descriptions of the STS API. For more information about using this service, see Temporary Security Credentials.

Hierarchy

Implements

Index

Constructors

constructor

Properties

Readonly config

The resolved configuration of STSClient class. This is resolved and normalized from the constructor configuration interface.

middlewareStack

Methods

assumeRole

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials that you can use to access Amazon Web Services resources that you might not normally have access to. These temporary credentials consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Typically, you use AssumeRole within your account or for cross-account access. For a comparison of AssumeRole with other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRole can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: You cannot call the Amazon Web Services STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create a role, you create two policies: A role trust policy that specifies who can assume the role and a permissions policy that specifies what can be done with the role. You specify the trusted principal who is allowed to assume the role in the role trust policy.

    To assume a role from a different account, your Amazon Web Services account must be trusted by the role. The trust relationship is defined in the role's trust policy when the role is created. That trust policy states which accounts are allowed to delegate that access to users in the account.

    A user who wants to access a role in a different account must also have permissions that are delegated from the user account administrator. The administrator must attach a policy that allows the user to call AssumeRole for the ARN of the role in the other account.

    To allow a user to assume a role in the same account, you can do either of the following:

    • Attach a policy to the user that allows the user to call AssumeRole (as long as the role's trust policy trusts the account).

    • Add the user as a principal directly in the role's trust policy.

    You can do either because the role’s trust policy acts as an IAM resource-based policy. When a resource-based policy grants access to a principal in the same account, no additional identity-based policy is required. For more information about trust policies and resource-based policies, see IAM Policies in the IAM User Guide.

         <p>
            <b>Tags</b>
         </p>
         <p>(Optional) You can pass tag key-value pairs to your session. These tags are called
         session tags. For more information about session tags, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_session-tags.html">Passing Session Tags in STS</a> in the
            <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The
         administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific
         session tags. For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/tutorial_attribute-based-access-control.html">Tutorial: Using Tags
            for Attribute-Based Access Control</a> in the
         <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role
         chaining. For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_session-tags.html#id_session-tags_role-chaining">Chaining Roles
            with Session Tags</a> in the <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>
            <b>Using MFA with AssumeRole</b>
         </p>
         <p>(Optional) You can include multi-factor authentication (MFA) information when you call
            <code>AssumeRole</code>. This is useful for cross-account scenarios to ensure that the
         user that assumes the role has been authenticated with an Amazon Web Services MFA device. In that
         scenario, the trust policy of the role being assumed includes a condition that tests for
         MFA authentication. If the caller does not include valid MFA information, the request to
         assume the role is denied. The condition in a trust policy that tests for MFA
         authentication might look like the following example.</p>
         <p>
            <code>"Condition": {"Bool": {"aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent": true}}</code>
         </p>
         <p>For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/MFAProtectedAPI.html">Configuring MFA-Protected API Access</a>
         in the <i>IAM User Guide</i> guide.</p>
         <p>To use MFA with <code>AssumeRole</code>, you pass values for the
            <code>SerialNumber</code> and <code>TokenCode</code> parameters. The
            <code>SerialNumber</code> value identifies the user's hardware or virtual MFA device.
         The <code>TokenCode</code> is the time-based one-time password (TOTP) that the MFA device
         produces. </p>
    

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<AssumeRoleCommandOutput>

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials that you can use to access Amazon Web Services resources that you might not normally have access to. These temporary credentials consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Typically, you use AssumeRole within your account or for cross-account access. For a comparison of AssumeRole with other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRole can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: You cannot call the Amazon Web Services STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create a role, you create two policies: A role trust policy that specifies who can assume the role and a permissions policy that specifies what can be done with the role. You specify the trusted principal who is allowed to assume the role in the role trust policy.

    To assume a role from a different account, your Amazon Web Services account must be trusted by the role. The trust relationship is defined in the role's trust policy when the role is created. That trust policy states which accounts are allowed to delegate that access to users in the account.

    A user who wants to access a role in a different account must also have permissions that are delegated from the user account administrator. The administrator must attach a policy that allows the user to call AssumeRole for the ARN of the role in the other account.

    To allow a user to assume a role in the same account, you can do either of the following:

    • Attach a policy to the user that allows the user to call AssumeRole (as long as the role's trust policy trusts the account).

    • Add the user as a principal directly in the role's trust policy.

    You can do either because the role’s trust policy acts as an IAM resource-based policy. When a resource-based policy grants access to a principal in the same account, no additional identity-based policy is required. For more information about trust policies and resource-based policies, see IAM Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can pass tag key-value pairs to your session. These tags are called session tags. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role chaining. For more information, see Chaining Roles with Session Tags in the IAM User Guide.

    Using MFA with AssumeRole

    (Optional) You can include multi-factor authentication (MFA) information when you call AssumeRole. This is useful for cross-account scenarios to ensure that the user that assumes the role has been authenticated with an Amazon Web Services MFA device. In that scenario, the trust policy of the role being assumed includes a condition that tests for MFA authentication. If the caller does not include valid MFA information, the request to assume the role is denied. The condition in a trust policy that tests for MFA authentication might look like the following example.

    "Condition": {"Bool": {"aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent": true}}

    For more information, see Configuring MFA-Protected API Access in the IAM User Guide guide.

    To use MFA with AssumeRole, you pass values for the SerialNumber and TokenCode parameters. The SerialNumber value identifies the user's hardware or virtual MFA device. The TokenCode is the time-based one-time password (TOTP) that the MFA device produces.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials that you can use to access Amazon Web Services resources that you might not normally have access to. These temporary credentials consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Typically, you use AssumeRole within your account or for cross-account access. For a comparison of AssumeRole with other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRole can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: You cannot call the Amazon Web Services STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create a role, you create two policies: A role trust policy that specifies who can assume the role and a permissions policy that specifies what can be done with the role. You specify the trusted principal who is allowed to assume the role in the role trust policy.

    To assume a role from a different account, your Amazon Web Services account must be trusted by the role. The trust relationship is defined in the role's trust policy when the role is created. That trust policy states which accounts are allowed to delegate that access to users in the account.

    A user who wants to access a role in a different account must also have permissions that are delegated from the user account administrator. The administrator must attach a policy that allows the user to call AssumeRole for the ARN of the role in the other account.

    To allow a user to assume a role in the same account, you can do either of the following:

    • Attach a policy to the user that allows the user to call AssumeRole (as long as the role's trust policy trusts the account).

    • Add the user as a principal directly in the role's trust policy.

    You can do either because the role’s trust policy acts as an IAM resource-based policy. When a resource-based policy grants access to a principal in the same account, no additional identity-based policy is required. For more information about trust policies and resource-based policies, see IAM Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can pass tag key-value pairs to your session. These tags are called session tags. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role chaining. For more information, see Chaining Roles with Session Tags in the IAM User Guide.

    Using MFA with AssumeRole

    (Optional) You can include multi-factor authentication (MFA) information when you call AssumeRole. This is useful for cross-account scenarios to ensure that the user that assumes the role has been authenticated with an Amazon Web Services MFA device. In that scenario, the trust policy of the role being assumed includes a condition that tests for MFA authentication. If the caller does not include valid MFA information, the request to assume the role is denied. The condition in a trust policy that tests for MFA authentication might look like the following example.

    "Condition": {"Bool": {"aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent": true}}

    For more information, see Configuring MFA-Protected API Access in the IAM User Guide guide.

    To use MFA with AssumeRole, you pass values for the SerialNumber and TokenCode parameters. The SerialNumber value identifies the user's hardware or virtual MFA device. The TokenCode is the time-based one-time password (TOTP) that the MFA device produces.

    Parameters

    Returns void

assumeRoleWithSAML

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials for users who have been authenticated via a SAML authentication response. This operation provides a mechanism for tying an enterprise identity store or directory to role-based Amazon Web Services access without user-specific credentials or configuration. For a comparison of AssumeRoleWithSAML with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    The temporary security credentials returned by this operation consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Applications can use these temporary security credentials to sign calls to Amazon Web Services services.

    Session Duration

    By default, the temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithSAML last for one hour. However, you can use the optional DurationSeconds parameter to specify the duration of your session. Your role session lasts for the duration that you specify, or until the time specified in the SAML authentication response's SessionNotOnOrAfter value, whichever is shorter. You can provide a DurationSeconds value from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to the maximum session duration setting for the role. This setting can have a value from 1 hour to 12 hours. To learn how to view the maximum value for your role, see View the Maximum Session Duration Setting for a Role in the IAM User Guide. The maximum session duration limit applies when you use the AssumeRole* API operations or the assume-role* CLI commands. However the limit does not apply when you use those operations to create a console URL. For more information, see Using IAM Roles in the IAM User Guide.

    Role chaining limits your CLI or Amazon Web Services API role session to a maximum of one hour. When you use the AssumeRole API operation to assume a role, you can specify the duration of your role session with the DurationSeconds parameter. You can specify a parameter value of up to 43200 seconds (12 hours), depending on the maximum session duration setting for your role. However, if you assume a role using role chaining and provide a DurationSeconds parameter value greater than one hour, the operation fails.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithSAML can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: you cannot call the STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithSAML does not require the use of Amazon Web Services security credentials. The identity of the caller is validated by using keys in the metadata document that is uploaded for the SAML provider entity for your identity provider.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithSAML can result in an entry in your CloudTrail logs. The entry includes the value in the NameID element of the SAML assertion. We recommend that you use a NameIDType that is not associated with any personally identifiable information (PII). For example, you could instead use the persistent identifier (urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:nameid-format:persistent).

    Tags

    (Optional) You can configure your IdP to pass attributes into your SAML assertion as session tags. Each session tag consists of a key name and an associated value. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can pass up to 50 session tags. The plaintext session tag keys can’t exceed 128 characters and the values can’t exceed 256 characters. For these and additional limits, see IAM and STS Character Limits in the IAM User Guide.

         <note>
            <p>An Amazon Web Services conversion compresses the passed inline session policy, managed policy ARNs,
            and session tags into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. Your request can
            fail for this limit even if your plaintext meets the other requirements. The
               <code>PackedPolicySize</code> response element indicates by percentage how close the
            policies and tags for your request are to the upper size limit.</p>
         </note>
    
         <p>You can pass a session tag with the same key as a tag that is attached to the role. When
         you do, session tags override the role's tags with the same key.</p>
         <p>An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The
         administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific
         session tags. For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/tutorial_attribute-based-access-control.html">Tutorial: Using Tags
            for Attribute-Based Access Control</a> in the
         <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role
         chaining. For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_session-tags.html#id_session-tags_role-chaining">Chaining Roles
            with Session Tags</a> in the <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>
            <b>SAML Configuration</b>
         </p>
         <p>Before your application can call <code>AssumeRoleWithSAML</code>, you must configure
         your SAML identity provider (IdP) to issue the claims required by Amazon Web Services. Additionally, you
         must use Identity and Access Management (IAM) to create a SAML provider entity in your Amazon Web Services account that
         represents your identity provider. You must also create an IAM role that specifies this
         SAML provider in its trust policy. </p>
         <p>For more information, see the following resources:</p>
         <ul>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_roles_providers_saml.html">About
                  SAML 2.0-based Federation</a> in the <i>IAM User Guide</i>.
            </p>
            </li>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_roles_providers_create_saml.html">Creating SAML Identity Providers</a> in the
                  <i>IAM User Guide</i>. </p>
            </li>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_roles_providers_create_saml_relying-party.html">Configuring
                  a Relying Party and Claims</a> in the <i>IAM User Guide</i>.
            </p>
            </li>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_roles_create_for-idp_saml.html">Creating a Role for SAML 2.0 Federation</a> in the
                  <i>IAM User Guide</i>. </p>
            </li>
         </ul>
    

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<AssumeRoleWithSAMLCommandOutput>

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials for users who have been authenticated via a SAML authentication response. This operation provides a mechanism for tying an enterprise identity store or directory to role-based Amazon Web Services access without user-specific credentials or configuration. For a comparison of AssumeRoleWithSAML with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    The temporary security credentials returned by this operation consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Applications can use these temporary security credentials to sign calls to Amazon Web Services services.

    Session Duration

    By default, the temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithSAML last for one hour. However, you can use the optional DurationSeconds parameter to specify the duration of your session. Your role session lasts for the duration that you specify, or until the time specified in the SAML authentication response's SessionNotOnOrAfter value, whichever is shorter. You can provide a DurationSeconds value from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to the maximum session duration setting for the role. This setting can have a value from 1 hour to 12 hours. To learn how to view the maximum value for your role, see View the Maximum Session Duration Setting for a Role in the IAM User Guide. The maximum session duration limit applies when you use the AssumeRole* API operations or the assume-role* CLI commands. However the limit does not apply when you use those operations to create a console URL. For more information, see Using IAM Roles in the IAM User Guide.

    Role chaining limits your CLI or Amazon Web Services API role session to a maximum of one hour. When you use the AssumeRole API operation to assume a role, you can specify the duration of your role session with the DurationSeconds parameter. You can specify a parameter value of up to 43200 seconds (12 hours), depending on the maximum session duration setting for your role. However, if you assume a role using role chaining and provide a DurationSeconds parameter value greater than one hour, the operation fails.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithSAML can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: you cannot call the STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithSAML does not require the use of Amazon Web Services security credentials. The identity of the caller is validated by using keys in the metadata document that is uploaded for the SAML provider entity for your identity provider.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithSAML can result in an entry in your CloudTrail logs. The entry includes the value in the NameID element of the SAML assertion. We recommend that you use a NameIDType that is not associated with any personally identifiable information (PII). For example, you could instead use the persistent identifier (urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:nameid-format:persistent).

    Tags

    (Optional) You can configure your IdP to pass attributes into your SAML assertion as session tags. Each session tag consists of a key name and an associated value. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can pass up to 50 session tags. The plaintext session tag keys can’t exceed 128 characters and the values can’t exceed 256 characters. For these and additional limits, see IAM and STS Character Limits in the IAM User Guide.

    An Amazon Web Services conversion compresses the passed inline session policy, managed policy ARNs, and session tags into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. Your request can fail for this limit even if your plaintext meets the other requirements. The PackedPolicySize response element indicates by percentage how close the policies and tags for your request are to the upper size limit.

    You can pass a session tag with the same key as a tag that is attached to the role. When you do, session tags override the role's tags with the same key.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role chaining. For more information, see Chaining Roles with Session Tags in the IAM User Guide.

    SAML Configuration

    Before your application can call AssumeRoleWithSAML, you must configure your SAML identity provider (IdP) to issue the claims required by Amazon Web Services. Additionally, you must use Identity and Access Management (IAM) to create a SAML provider entity in your Amazon Web Services account that represents your identity provider. You must also create an IAM role that specifies this SAML provider in its trust policy.

    For more information, see the following resources:

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials for users who have been authenticated via a SAML authentication response. This operation provides a mechanism for tying an enterprise identity store or directory to role-based Amazon Web Services access without user-specific credentials or configuration. For a comparison of AssumeRoleWithSAML with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    The temporary security credentials returned by this operation consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Applications can use these temporary security credentials to sign calls to Amazon Web Services services.

    Session Duration

    By default, the temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithSAML last for one hour. However, you can use the optional DurationSeconds parameter to specify the duration of your session. Your role session lasts for the duration that you specify, or until the time specified in the SAML authentication response's SessionNotOnOrAfter value, whichever is shorter. You can provide a DurationSeconds value from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to the maximum session duration setting for the role. This setting can have a value from 1 hour to 12 hours. To learn how to view the maximum value for your role, see View the Maximum Session Duration Setting for a Role in the IAM User Guide. The maximum session duration limit applies when you use the AssumeRole* API operations or the assume-role* CLI commands. However the limit does not apply when you use those operations to create a console URL. For more information, see Using IAM Roles in the IAM User Guide.

    Role chaining limits your CLI or Amazon Web Services API role session to a maximum of one hour. When you use the AssumeRole API operation to assume a role, you can specify the duration of your role session with the DurationSeconds parameter. You can specify a parameter value of up to 43200 seconds (12 hours), depending on the maximum session duration setting for your role. However, if you assume a role using role chaining and provide a DurationSeconds parameter value greater than one hour, the operation fails.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithSAML can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: you cannot call the STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithSAML does not require the use of Amazon Web Services security credentials. The identity of the caller is validated by using keys in the metadata document that is uploaded for the SAML provider entity for your identity provider.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithSAML can result in an entry in your CloudTrail logs. The entry includes the value in the NameID element of the SAML assertion. We recommend that you use a NameIDType that is not associated with any personally identifiable information (PII). For example, you could instead use the persistent identifier (urn:oasis:names:tc:SAML:2.0:nameid-format:persistent).

    Tags

    (Optional) You can configure your IdP to pass attributes into your SAML assertion as session tags. Each session tag consists of a key name and an associated value. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can pass up to 50 session tags. The plaintext session tag keys can’t exceed 128 characters and the values can’t exceed 256 characters. For these and additional limits, see IAM and STS Character Limits in the IAM User Guide.

    An Amazon Web Services conversion compresses the passed inline session policy, managed policy ARNs, and session tags into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. Your request can fail for this limit even if your plaintext meets the other requirements. The PackedPolicySize response element indicates by percentage how close the policies and tags for your request are to the upper size limit.

    You can pass a session tag with the same key as a tag that is attached to the role. When you do, session tags override the role's tags with the same key.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role chaining. For more information, see Chaining Roles with Session Tags in the IAM User Guide.

    SAML Configuration

    Before your application can call AssumeRoleWithSAML, you must configure your SAML identity provider (IdP) to issue the claims required by Amazon Web Services. Additionally, you must use Identity and Access Management (IAM) to create a SAML provider entity in your Amazon Web Services account that represents your identity provider. You must also create an IAM role that specifies this SAML provider in its trust policy.

    For more information, see the following resources:

    Parameters

    Returns void

assumeRoleWithWebIdentity

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials for users who have been authenticated in a mobile or web application with a web identity provider. Example providers include the OAuth 2.0 providers Login with Amazon and Facebook, or any OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider such as Google or Amazon Cognito federated identities.

    For mobile applications, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito. You can use Amazon Cognito with the Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide and the Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide to uniquely identify a user. You can also supply the user with a consistent identity throughout the lifetime of an application.

    To learn more about Amazon Cognito, see Amazon Cognito Overview in Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide and Amazon Cognito Overview in the Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity does not require the use of Amazon Web Services security credentials. Therefore, you can distribute an application (for example, on mobile devices) that requests temporary security credentials without including long-term Amazon Web Services credentials in the application. You also don't need to deploy server-based proxy services that use long-term Amazon Web Services credentials. Instead, the identity of the caller is validated by using a token from the web identity provider. For a comparison of AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    The temporary security credentials returned by this API consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Applications can use these temporary security credentials to sign calls to Amazon Web Services service API operations.

    Session Duration

    By default, the temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity last for one hour. However, you can use the optional DurationSeconds parameter to specify the duration of your session. You can provide a value from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to the maximum session duration setting for the role. This setting can have a value from 1 hour to 12 hours. To learn how to view the maximum value for your role, see View the Maximum Session Duration Setting for a Role in the IAM User Guide. The maximum session duration limit applies when you use the AssumeRole* API operations or the assume-role* CLI commands. However the limit does not apply when you use those operations to create a console URL. For more information, see Using IAM Roles in the IAM User Guide.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: you cannot call the STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can configure your IdP to pass attributes into your web identity token as session tags. Each session tag consists of a key name and an associated value. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can pass up to 50 session tags. The plaintext session tag keys can’t exceed 128 characters and the values can’t exceed 256 characters. For these and additional limits, see IAM and STS Character Limits in the IAM User Guide.

         <note>
            <p>An Amazon Web Services conversion compresses the passed inline session policy, managed policy ARNs,
            and session tags into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. Your request can
            fail for this limit even if your plaintext meets the other requirements. The
               <code>PackedPolicySize</code> response element indicates by percentage how close the
            policies and tags for your request are to the upper size limit.</p>
         </note>
    
         <p>You can pass a session tag with the same key as a tag that is attached to the role. When
         you do, the session tag overrides the role tag with the same key.</p>
         <p>An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The
         administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific
         session tags. For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/tutorial_attribute-based-access-control.html">Tutorial: Using Tags
            for Attribute-Based Access Control</a> in the
         <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role
         chaining. For more information, see <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_session-tags.html#id_session-tags_role-chaining">Chaining Roles
            with Session Tags</a> in the <i>IAM User Guide</i>.</p>
         <p>
            <b>Identities</b>
         </p>
         <p>Before your application can call <code>AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity</code>, you must have
         an identity token from a supported identity provider and create a role that the application
         can assume. The role that your application assumes must trust the identity provider that is
         associated with the identity token. In other words, the identity provider must be specified
         in the role's trust policy. </p>
         <important>
            <p>Calling <code>AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity</code> can result in an entry in your
            CloudTrail logs. The entry includes the <a href="http://openid.net/specs/openid-connect-core-1_0.html#Claims">Subject</a> of
            the provided web identity token. We recommend that you avoid using any personally
            identifiable information (PII) in this field. For example, you could instead use a GUID
            or a pairwise identifier, as <a href="http://openid.net/specs/openid-connect-core-1_0.html#SubjectIDTypes">suggested
               in the OIDC specification</a>.</p>
         </important>
         <p>For more information about how to use web identity federation and the
            <code>AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity</code> API, see the following resources: </p>
         <ul>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_roles_providers_oidc_manual.html">Using Web Identity Federation API Operations for Mobile Apps</a> and <a href="https://docs.aws.amazon.com/IAM/latest/UserGuide/id_credentials_temp_request.html#api_assumerolewithwebidentity">Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider</a>. </p>
            </li>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/aws/the-aws-web-identity-federation-playground/"> Web Identity Federation Playground</a>. Walk through the process of
               authenticating through Login with Amazon, Facebook, or Google, getting temporary
               security credentials, and then using those credentials to make a request to Amazon Web Services.
            </p>
            </li>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="http://aws.amazon.com/sdkforios/">Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide</a> and <a href="http://aws.amazon.com/sdkforandroid/">Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide</a>. These toolkits
               contain sample apps that show how to invoke the identity providers. The toolkits then
               show how to use the information from these providers to get and use temporary
               security credentials. </p>
            </li>
            <li>
               <p>
                  <a href="http://aws.amazon.com/articles/web-identity-federation-with-mobile-applications">Web Identity
                  Federation with Mobile Applications</a>. This article discusses web identity
               federation and shows an example of how to use web identity federation to get access
               to content in Amazon S3. </p>
            </li>
         </ul>
    

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<AssumeRoleWithWebIdentityCommandOutput>

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials for users who have been authenticated in a mobile or web application with a web identity provider. Example providers include the OAuth 2.0 providers Login with Amazon and Facebook, or any OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider such as Google or Amazon Cognito federated identities.

    For mobile applications, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito. You can use Amazon Cognito with the Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide and the Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide to uniquely identify a user. You can also supply the user with a consistent identity throughout the lifetime of an application.

    To learn more about Amazon Cognito, see Amazon Cognito Overview in Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide and Amazon Cognito Overview in the Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity does not require the use of Amazon Web Services security credentials. Therefore, you can distribute an application (for example, on mobile devices) that requests temporary security credentials without including long-term Amazon Web Services credentials in the application. You also don't need to deploy server-based proxy services that use long-term Amazon Web Services credentials. Instead, the identity of the caller is validated by using a token from the web identity provider. For a comparison of AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    The temporary security credentials returned by this API consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Applications can use these temporary security credentials to sign calls to Amazon Web Services service API operations.

    Session Duration

    By default, the temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity last for one hour. However, you can use the optional DurationSeconds parameter to specify the duration of your session. You can provide a value from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to the maximum session duration setting for the role. This setting can have a value from 1 hour to 12 hours. To learn how to view the maximum value for your role, see View the Maximum Session Duration Setting for a Role in the IAM User Guide. The maximum session duration limit applies when you use the AssumeRole* API operations or the assume-role* CLI commands. However the limit does not apply when you use those operations to create a console URL. For more information, see Using IAM Roles in the IAM User Guide.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: you cannot call the STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can configure your IdP to pass attributes into your web identity token as session tags. Each session tag consists of a key name and an associated value. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can pass up to 50 session tags. The plaintext session tag keys can’t exceed 128 characters and the values can’t exceed 256 characters. For these and additional limits, see IAM and STS Character Limits in the IAM User Guide.

    An Amazon Web Services conversion compresses the passed inline session policy, managed policy ARNs, and session tags into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. Your request can fail for this limit even if your plaintext meets the other requirements. The PackedPolicySize response element indicates by percentage how close the policies and tags for your request are to the upper size limit.

    You can pass a session tag with the same key as a tag that is attached to the role. When you do, the session tag overrides the role tag with the same key.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role chaining. For more information, see Chaining Roles with Session Tags in the IAM User Guide.

    Identities

    Before your application can call AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity, you must have an identity token from a supported identity provider and create a role that the application can assume. The role that your application assumes must trust the identity provider that is associated with the identity token. In other words, the identity provider must be specified in the role's trust policy.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity can result in an entry in your CloudTrail logs. The entry includes the Subject of the provided web identity token. We recommend that you avoid using any personally identifiable information (PII) in this field. For example, you could instead use a GUID or a pairwise identifier, as suggested in the OIDC specification.

    For more information about how to use web identity federation and the AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity API, see the following resources:

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials for users who have been authenticated in a mobile or web application with a web identity provider. Example providers include the OAuth 2.0 providers Login with Amazon and Facebook, or any OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider such as Google or Amazon Cognito federated identities.

    For mobile applications, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito. You can use Amazon Cognito with the Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide and the Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide to uniquely identify a user. You can also supply the user with a consistent identity throughout the lifetime of an application.

    To learn more about Amazon Cognito, see Amazon Cognito Overview in Amazon Web Services SDK for Android Developer Guide and Amazon Cognito Overview in the Amazon Web Services SDK for iOS Developer Guide.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity does not require the use of Amazon Web Services security credentials. Therefore, you can distribute an application (for example, on mobile devices) that requests temporary security credentials without including long-term Amazon Web Services credentials in the application. You also don't need to deploy server-based proxy services that use long-term Amazon Web Services credentials. Instead, the identity of the caller is validated by using a token from the web identity provider. For a comparison of AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    The temporary security credentials returned by this API consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Applications can use these temporary security credentials to sign calls to Amazon Web Services service API operations.

    Session Duration

    By default, the temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity last for one hour. However, you can use the optional DurationSeconds parameter to specify the duration of your session. You can provide a value from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to the maximum session duration setting for the role. This setting can have a value from 1 hour to 12 hours. To learn how to view the maximum value for your role, see View the Maximum Session Duration Setting for a Role in the IAM User Guide. The maximum session duration limit applies when you use the AssumeRole* API operations or the assume-role* CLI commands. However the limit does not apply when you use those operations to create a console URL. For more information, see Using IAM Roles in the IAM User Guide.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exception: you cannot call the STS GetFederationToken or GetSessionToken API operations.

    (Optional) You can pass inline or managed session policies to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters. Passing policies to this operation returns new temporary credentials. The resulting session's permissions are the intersection of the role's identity-based policy and the session policies. You can use the role's temporary credentials in subsequent Amazon Web Services API calls to access resources in the account that owns the role. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those allowed by the identity-based policy of the role that is being assumed. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can configure your IdP to pass attributes into your web identity token as session tags. Each session tag consists of a key name and an associated value. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can pass up to 50 session tags. The plaintext session tag keys can’t exceed 128 characters and the values can’t exceed 256 characters. For these and additional limits, see IAM and STS Character Limits in the IAM User Guide.

    An Amazon Web Services conversion compresses the passed inline session policy, managed policy ARNs, and session tags into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. Your request can fail for this limit even if your plaintext meets the other requirements. The PackedPolicySize response element indicates by percentage how close the policies and tags for your request are to the upper size limit.

    You can pass a session tag with the same key as a tag that is attached to the role. When you do, the session tag overrides the role tag with the same key.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    You can set the session tags as transitive. Transitive tags persist during role chaining. For more information, see Chaining Roles with Session Tags in the IAM User Guide.

    Identities

    Before your application can call AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity, you must have an identity token from a supported identity provider and create a role that the application can assume. The role that your application assumes must trust the identity provider that is associated with the identity token. In other words, the identity provider must be specified in the role's trust policy.

    Calling AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity can result in an entry in your CloudTrail logs. The entry includes the Subject of the provided web identity token. We recommend that you avoid using any personally identifiable information (PII) in this field. For example, you could instead use a GUID or a pairwise identifier, as suggested in the OIDC specification.

    For more information about how to use web identity federation and the AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity API, see the following resources:

    Parameters

    Returns void

decodeAuthorizationMessage

  • Decodes additional information about the authorization status of a request from an encoded message returned in response to an Amazon Web Services request.

    For example, if a user is not authorized to perform an operation that he or she has requested, the request returns a Client.UnauthorizedOperation response (an HTTP 403 response). Some Amazon Web Services operations additionally return an encoded message that can provide details about this authorization failure.

    Only certain Amazon Web Services operations return an encoded authorization message. The documentation for an individual operation indicates whether that operation returns an encoded message in addition to returning an HTTP code.

    The message is encoded because the details of the authorization status can contain privileged information that the user who requested the operation should not see. To decode an authorization status message, a user must be granted permissions through an IAM policy to request the DecodeAuthorizationMessage (sts:DecodeAuthorizationMessage) action.

    The decoded message includes the following type of information:

    • Whether the request was denied due to an explicit deny or due to the absence of an explicit allow. For more information, see Determining Whether a Request is Allowed or Denied in the IAM User Guide.

    • The principal who made the request.

    • The requested action.

    • The requested resource.

    • The values of condition keys in the context of the user's request.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DecodeAuthorizationMessageCommandOutput>

  • Decodes additional information about the authorization status of a request from an encoded message returned in response to an Amazon Web Services request.

    For example, if a user is not authorized to perform an operation that he or she has requested, the request returns a Client.UnauthorizedOperation response (an HTTP 403 response). Some Amazon Web Services operations additionally return an encoded message that can provide details about this authorization failure.

    Only certain Amazon Web Services operations return an encoded authorization message. The documentation for an individual operation indicates whether that operation returns an encoded message in addition to returning an HTTP code.

    The message is encoded because the details of the authorization status can contain privileged information that the user who requested the operation should not see. To decode an authorization status message, a user must be granted permissions through an IAM policy to request the DecodeAuthorizationMessage (sts:DecodeAuthorizationMessage) action.

    The decoded message includes the following type of information:

    • Whether the request was denied due to an explicit deny or due to the absence of an explicit allow. For more information, see Determining Whether a Request is Allowed or Denied in the IAM User Guide.

    • The principal who made the request.

    • The requested action.

    • The requested resource.

    • The values of condition keys in the context of the user's request.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Decodes additional information about the authorization status of a request from an encoded message returned in response to an Amazon Web Services request.

    For example, if a user is not authorized to perform an operation that he or she has requested, the request returns a Client.UnauthorizedOperation response (an HTTP 403 response). Some Amazon Web Services operations additionally return an encoded message that can provide details about this authorization failure.

    Only certain Amazon Web Services operations return an encoded authorization message. The documentation for an individual operation indicates whether that operation returns an encoded message in addition to returning an HTTP code.

    The message is encoded because the details of the authorization status can contain privileged information that the user who requested the operation should not see. To decode an authorization status message, a user must be granted permissions through an IAM policy to request the DecodeAuthorizationMessage (sts:DecodeAuthorizationMessage) action.

    The decoded message includes the following type of information:

    • Whether the request was denied due to an explicit deny or due to the absence of an explicit allow. For more information, see Determining Whether a Request is Allowed or Denied in the IAM User Guide.

    • The principal who made the request.

    • The requested action.

    • The requested resource.

    • The values of condition keys in the context of the user's request.

    Parameters

    Returns void

destroy

  • destroy(): void
  • Destroy underlying resources, like sockets. It's usually not necessary to do this. However in Node.js, it's best to explicitly shut down the client's agent when it is no longer needed. Otherwise, sockets might stay open for quite a long time before the server terminates them.

    Returns void

getAccessKeyInfo

  • Returns the account identifier for the specified access key ID.

    Access keys consist of two parts: an access key ID (for example, AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE) and a secret access key (for example, wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY). For more information about access keys, see Managing Access Keys for IAM Users in the IAM User Guide.

    When you pass an access key ID to this operation, it returns the ID of the Amazon Web Services account to which the keys belong. Access key IDs beginning with AKIA are long-term credentials for an IAM user or the Amazon Web Services account root user. Access key IDs beginning with ASIA are temporary credentials that are created using STS operations. If the account in the response belongs to you, you can sign in as the root user and review your root user access keys. Then, you can pull a credentials report to learn which IAM user owns the keys. To learn who requested the temporary credentials for an ASIA access key, view the STS events in your CloudTrail logs in the IAM User Guide.

    This operation does not indicate the state of the access key. The key might be active, inactive, or deleted. Active keys might not have permissions to perform an operation. Providing a deleted access key might return an error that the key doesn't exist.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<GetAccessKeyInfoCommandOutput>

  • Returns the account identifier for the specified access key ID.

    Access keys consist of two parts: an access key ID (for example, AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE) and a secret access key (for example, wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY). For more information about access keys, see Managing Access Keys for IAM Users in the IAM User Guide.

    When you pass an access key ID to this operation, it returns the ID of the Amazon Web Services account to which the keys belong. Access key IDs beginning with AKIA are long-term credentials for an IAM user or the Amazon Web Services account root user. Access key IDs beginning with ASIA are temporary credentials that are created using STS operations. If the account in the response belongs to you, you can sign in as the root user and review your root user access keys. Then, you can pull a credentials report to learn which IAM user owns the keys. To learn who requested the temporary credentials for an ASIA access key, view the STS events in your CloudTrail logs in the IAM User Guide.

    This operation does not indicate the state of the access key. The key might be active, inactive, or deleted. Active keys might not have permissions to perform an operation. Providing a deleted access key might return an error that the key doesn't exist.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns the account identifier for the specified access key ID.

    Access keys consist of two parts: an access key ID (for example, AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE) and a secret access key (for example, wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY). For more information about access keys, see Managing Access Keys for IAM Users in the IAM User Guide.

    When you pass an access key ID to this operation, it returns the ID of the Amazon Web Services account to which the keys belong. Access key IDs beginning with AKIA are long-term credentials for an IAM user or the Amazon Web Services account root user. Access key IDs beginning with ASIA are temporary credentials that are created using STS operations. If the account in the response belongs to you, you can sign in as the root user and review your root user access keys. Then, you can pull a credentials report to learn which IAM user owns the keys. To learn who requested the temporary credentials for an ASIA access key, view the STS events in your CloudTrail logs in the IAM User Guide.

    This operation does not indicate the state of the access key. The key might be active, inactive, or deleted. Active keys might not have permissions to perform an operation. Providing a deleted access key might return an error that the key doesn't exist.

    Parameters

    Returns void

getCallerIdentity

  • Returns details about the IAM user or role whose credentials are used to call the operation.

    No permissions are required to perform this operation. If an administrator adds a policy to your IAM user or role that explicitly denies access to the sts:GetCallerIdentity action, you can still perform this operation. Permissions are not required because the same information is returned when an IAM user or role is denied access. To view an example response, see I Am Not Authorized to Perform: iam:DeleteVirtualMFADevice in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<GetCallerIdentityCommandOutput>

  • Returns details about the IAM user or role whose credentials are used to call the operation.

    No permissions are required to perform this operation. If an administrator adds a policy to your IAM user or role that explicitly denies access to the sts:GetCallerIdentity action, you can still perform this operation. Permissions are not required because the same information is returned when an IAM user or role is denied access. To view an example response, see I Am Not Authorized to Perform: iam:DeleteVirtualMFADevice in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns details about the IAM user or role whose credentials are used to call the operation.

    No permissions are required to perform this operation. If an administrator adds a policy to your IAM user or role that explicitly denies access to the sts:GetCallerIdentity action, you can still perform this operation. Permissions are not required because the same information is returned when an IAM user or role is denied access. To view an example response, see I Am Not Authorized to Perform: iam:DeleteVirtualMFADevice in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

getFederationToken

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials (consisting of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token) for a federated user. A typical use is in a proxy application that gets temporary security credentials on behalf of distributed applications inside a corporate network. You must call the GetFederationToken operation using the long-term security credentials of an IAM user. As a result, this call is appropriate in contexts where those credentials can be safely stored, usually in a server-based application. For a comparison of GetFederationToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider in the IAM User Guide.

    You can also call GetFederationToken using the security credentials of an Amazon Web Services account root user, but we do not recommend it. Instead, we recommend that you create an IAM user for the purpose of the proxy application. Then attach a policy to the IAM user that limits federated users to only the actions and resources that they need to access. For more information, see IAM Best Practices in the IAM User Guide.

    Session duration

    The temporary credentials are valid for the specified duration, from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours). The default session duration is 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Temporary credentials obtained by using the Amazon Web Services account root user credentials have a maximum duration of 3,600 seconds (1 hour).

    Permissions

    You can use the temporary credentials created by GetFederationToken in any Amazon Web Services service except the following:

    • You cannot call any IAM operations using the CLI or the Amazon Web Services API.

    • You cannot call any STS operations except GetCallerIdentity.

    You must pass an inline or managed session policy to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters.

    Though the session policy parameters are optional, if you do not pass a policy, then the resulting federated user session has no permissions. When you pass session policies, the session permissions are the intersection of the IAM user policies and the session policies that you pass. This gives you a way to further restrict the permissions for a federated user. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those that are defined in the permissions policy of the IAM user. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide. For information about using GetFederationToken to create temporary security credentials, see GetFederationToken—Federation Through a Custom Identity Broker.

    You can use the credentials to access a resource that has a resource-based policy. If that policy specifically references the federated user session in the Principal element of the policy, the session has the permissions allowed by the policy. These permissions are granted in addition to the permissions granted by the session policies.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can pass tag key-value pairs to your session. These are called session tags. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider in the IAM User Guide.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    Tag key–value pairs are not case sensitive, but case is preserved. This means that you cannot have separate Department and department tag keys. Assume that the user that you are federating has the Department=Marketing tag and you pass the department=engineering session tag. Department and department are not saved as separate tags, and the session tag passed in the request takes precedence over the user tag.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<GetFederationTokenCommandOutput>

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials (consisting of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token) for a federated user. A typical use is in a proxy application that gets temporary security credentials on behalf of distributed applications inside a corporate network. You must call the GetFederationToken operation using the long-term security credentials of an IAM user. As a result, this call is appropriate in contexts where those credentials can be safely stored, usually in a server-based application. For a comparison of GetFederationToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider in the IAM User Guide.

    You can also call GetFederationToken using the security credentials of an Amazon Web Services account root user, but we do not recommend it. Instead, we recommend that you create an IAM user for the purpose of the proxy application. Then attach a policy to the IAM user that limits federated users to only the actions and resources that they need to access. For more information, see IAM Best Practices in the IAM User Guide.

    Session duration

    The temporary credentials are valid for the specified duration, from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours). The default session duration is 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Temporary credentials obtained by using the Amazon Web Services account root user credentials have a maximum duration of 3,600 seconds (1 hour).

    Permissions

    You can use the temporary credentials created by GetFederationToken in any Amazon Web Services service except the following:

    • You cannot call any IAM operations using the CLI or the Amazon Web Services API.

    • You cannot call any STS operations except GetCallerIdentity.

    You must pass an inline or managed session policy to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters.

    Though the session policy parameters are optional, if you do not pass a policy, then the resulting federated user session has no permissions. When you pass session policies, the session permissions are the intersection of the IAM user policies and the session policies that you pass. This gives you a way to further restrict the permissions for a federated user. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those that are defined in the permissions policy of the IAM user. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide. For information about using GetFederationToken to create temporary security credentials, see GetFederationToken—Federation Through a Custom Identity Broker.

    You can use the credentials to access a resource that has a resource-based policy. If that policy specifically references the federated user session in the Principal element of the policy, the session has the permissions allowed by the policy. These permissions are granted in addition to the permissions granted by the session policies.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can pass tag key-value pairs to your session. These are called session tags. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider in the IAM User Guide.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    Tag key–value pairs are not case sensitive, but case is preserved. This means that you cannot have separate Department and department tag keys. Assume that the user that you are federating has the Department=Marketing tag and you pass the department=engineering session tag. Department and department are not saved as separate tags, and the session tag passed in the request takes precedence over the user tag.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns a set of temporary security credentials (consisting of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token) for a federated user. A typical use is in a proxy application that gets temporary security credentials on behalf of distributed applications inside a corporate network. You must call the GetFederationToken operation using the long-term security credentials of an IAM user. As a result, this call is appropriate in contexts where those credentials can be safely stored, usually in a server-based application. For a comparison of GetFederationToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider in the IAM User Guide.

    You can also call GetFederationToken using the security credentials of an Amazon Web Services account root user, but we do not recommend it. Instead, we recommend that you create an IAM user for the purpose of the proxy application. Then attach a policy to the IAM user that limits federated users to only the actions and resources that they need to access. For more information, see IAM Best Practices in the IAM User Guide.

    Session duration

    The temporary credentials are valid for the specified duration, from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours). The default session duration is 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Temporary credentials obtained by using the Amazon Web Services account root user credentials have a maximum duration of 3,600 seconds (1 hour).

    Permissions

    You can use the temporary credentials created by GetFederationToken in any Amazon Web Services service except the following:

    • You cannot call any IAM operations using the CLI or the Amazon Web Services API.

    • You cannot call any STS operations except GetCallerIdentity.

    You must pass an inline or managed session policy to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policy Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) to use as managed session policies. The plaintext that you use for both inline and managed session policies can't exceed 2,048 characters.

    Though the session policy parameters are optional, if you do not pass a policy, then the resulting federated user session has no permissions. When you pass session policies, the session permissions are the intersection of the IAM user policies and the session policies that you pass. This gives you a way to further restrict the permissions for a federated user. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those that are defined in the permissions policy of the IAM user. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide. For information about using GetFederationToken to create temporary security credentials, see GetFederationToken—Federation Through a Custom Identity Broker.

    You can use the credentials to access a resource that has a resource-based policy. If that policy specifically references the federated user session in the Principal element of the policy, the session has the permissions allowed by the policy. These permissions are granted in addition to the permissions granted by the session policies.

    Tags

    (Optional) You can pass tag key-value pairs to your session. These are called session tags. For more information about session tags, see Passing Session Tags in STS in the IAM User Guide.

    You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider in the IAM User Guide.

    An administrator must grant you the permissions necessary to pass session tags. The administrator can also create granular permissions to allow you to pass only specific session tags. For more information, see Tutorial: Using Tags for Attribute-Based Access Control in the IAM User Guide.

    Tag key–value pairs are not case sensitive, but case is preserved. This means that you cannot have separate Department and department tag keys. Assume that the user that you are federating has the Department=Marketing tag and you pass the department=engineering session tag. Department and department are not saved as separate tags, and the session tag passed in the request takes precedence over the user tag.

    Parameters

    Returns void

getSessionToken

  • Returns a set of temporary credentials for an Amazon Web Services account or IAM user. The credentials consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Typically, you use GetSessionToken if you want to use MFA to protect programmatic calls to specific Amazon Web Services API operations like Amazon EC2 StopInstances. MFA-enabled IAM users would need to call GetSessionToken and submit an MFA code that is associated with their MFA device. Using the temporary security credentials that are returned from the call, IAM users can then make programmatic calls to API operations that require MFA authentication. If you do not supply a correct MFA code, then the API returns an access denied error. For a comparison of GetSessionToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    No permissions are required for users to perform this operation. The purpose of the sts:GetSessionToken operation is to authenticate the user using MFA. You cannot use policies to control authentication operations. For more information, see Permissions for GetSessionToken in the IAM User Guide.

    Session Duration

    The GetSessionToken operation must be called by using the long-term Amazon Web Services security credentials of the Amazon Web Services account root user or an IAM user. Credentials that are created by IAM users are valid for the duration that you specify. This duration can range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours), with a default of 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Credentials based on account credentials can range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to 3,600 seconds (1 hour), with a default of 1 hour.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by GetSessionToken can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exceptions:

    • You cannot call any IAM API operations unless MFA authentication information is included in the request.

    • You cannot call any STS API except AssumeRole or GetCallerIdentity.

    We recommend that you do not call GetSessionToken with Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. Instead, follow our best practices by creating one or more IAM users, giving them the necessary permissions, and using IAM users for everyday interaction with Amazon Web Services.

    The credentials that are returned by GetSessionToken are based on permissions associated with the user whose credentials were used to call the operation. If GetSessionToken is called using Amazon Web Services account root user credentials, the temporary credentials have root user permissions. Similarly, if GetSessionToken is called using the credentials of an IAM user, the temporary credentials have the same permissions as the IAM user.

    For more information about using GetSessionToken to create temporary credentials, go to Temporary Credentials for Users in Untrusted Environments in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<GetSessionTokenCommandOutput>

  • Returns a set of temporary credentials for an Amazon Web Services account or IAM user. The credentials consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Typically, you use GetSessionToken if you want to use MFA to protect programmatic calls to specific Amazon Web Services API operations like Amazon EC2 StopInstances. MFA-enabled IAM users would need to call GetSessionToken and submit an MFA code that is associated with their MFA device. Using the temporary security credentials that are returned from the call, IAM users can then make programmatic calls to API operations that require MFA authentication. If you do not supply a correct MFA code, then the API returns an access denied error. For a comparison of GetSessionToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    No permissions are required for users to perform this operation. The purpose of the sts:GetSessionToken operation is to authenticate the user using MFA. You cannot use policies to control authentication operations. For more information, see Permissions for GetSessionToken in the IAM User Guide.

    Session Duration

    The GetSessionToken operation must be called by using the long-term Amazon Web Services security credentials of the Amazon Web Services account root user or an IAM user. Credentials that are created by IAM users are valid for the duration that you specify. This duration can range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours), with a default of 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Credentials based on account credentials can range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to 3,600 seconds (1 hour), with a default of 1 hour.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by GetSessionToken can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exceptions:

    • You cannot call any IAM API operations unless MFA authentication information is included in the request.

    • You cannot call any STS API except AssumeRole or GetCallerIdentity.

    We recommend that you do not call GetSessionToken with Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. Instead, follow our best practices by creating one or more IAM users, giving them the necessary permissions, and using IAM users for everyday interaction with Amazon Web Services.

    The credentials that are returned by GetSessionToken are based on permissions associated with the user whose credentials were used to call the operation. If GetSessionToken is called using Amazon Web Services account root user credentials, the temporary credentials have root user permissions. Similarly, if GetSessionToken is called using the credentials of an IAM user, the temporary credentials have the same permissions as the IAM user.

    For more information about using GetSessionToken to create temporary credentials, go to Temporary Credentials for Users in Untrusted Environments in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Returns a set of temporary credentials for an Amazon Web Services account or IAM user. The credentials consist of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token. Typically, you use GetSessionToken if you want to use MFA to protect programmatic calls to specific Amazon Web Services API operations like Amazon EC2 StopInstances. MFA-enabled IAM users would need to call GetSessionToken and submit an MFA code that is associated with their MFA device. Using the temporary security credentials that are returned from the call, IAM users can then make programmatic calls to API operations that require MFA authentication. If you do not supply a correct MFA code, then the API returns an access denied error. For a comparison of GetSessionToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the Amazon Web Services STS API operations in the IAM User Guide.

    No permissions are required for users to perform this operation. The purpose of the sts:GetSessionToken operation is to authenticate the user using MFA. You cannot use policies to control authentication operations. For more information, see Permissions for GetSessionToken in the IAM User Guide.

    Session Duration

    The GetSessionToken operation must be called by using the long-term Amazon Web Services security credentials of the Amazon Web Services account root user or an IAM user. Credentials that are created by IAM users are valid for the duration that you specify. This duration can range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours), with a default of 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Credentials based on account credentials can range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to 3,600 seconds (1 hour), with a default of 1 hour.

    Permissions

    The temporary security credentials created by GetSessionToken can be used to make API calls to any Amazon Web Services service with the following exceptions:

    • You cannot call any IAM API operations unless MFA authentication information is included in the request.

    • You cannot call any STS API except AssumeRole or GetCallerIdentity.

    We recommend that you do not call GetSessionToken with Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. Instead, follow our best practices by creating one or more IAM users, giving them the necessary permissions, and using IAM users for everyday interaction with Amazon Web Services.

    The credentials that are returned by GetSessionToken are based on permissions associated with the user whose credentials were used to call the operation. If GetSessionToken is called using Amazon Web Services account root user credentials, the temporary credentials have root user permissions. Similarly, if GetSessionToken is called using the credentials of an IAM user, the temporary credentials have the same permissions as the IAM user.

    For more information about using GetSessionToken to create temporary credentials, go to Temporary Credentials for Users in Untrusted Environments in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

send