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Class IAM

Identity and Access Management

Identity and Access Management (IAM) is a web service for securely controlling access to Amazon Web Services services. With IAM, you can centrally manage users, security credentials such as access keys, and permissions that control which Amazon Web Services resources users and applications can access. For more information about IAM, see Identity and Access Management (IAM) and the Identity and Access Management User Guide.

Hierarchy

Implements

Index

Constructors

Properties

Methods

Constructors

constructor

Properties

Readonly config

The resolved configuration of IAMClient class. This is resolved and normalized from the constructor configuration interface.

middlewareStack

Methods

addClientIDToOpenIDConnectProvider

addRoleToInstanceProfile

addUserToGroup

attachGroupPolicy

attachRolePolicy

  • Attaches the specified managed policy to the specified IAM role. When you attach a managed policy to a role, the managed policy becomes part of the role's permission (access) policy.

    You cannot use a managed policy as the role's trust policy. The role's trust policy is created at the same time as the role, using CreateRole. You can update a role's trust policy using UpdateAssumeRolePolicy.

    Use this operation to attach a managed policy to a role. To embed an inline policy in a role, use PutRolePolicy. For more information about policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    As a best practice, you can validate your IAM policies. To learn more, see Validating IAM policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<AttachRolePolicyCommandOutput>

  • Attaches the specified managed policy to the specified IAM role. When you attach a managed policy to a role, the managed policy becomes part of the role's permission (access) policy.

    You cannot use a managed policy as the role's trust policy. The role's trust policy is created at the same time as the role, using CreateRole. You can update a role's trust policy using UpdateAssumeRolePolicy.

    Use this operation to attach a managed policy to a role. To embed an inline policy in a role, use PutRolePolicy. For more information about policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    As a best practice, you can validate your IAM policies. To learn more, see Validating IAM policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Attaches the specified managed policy to the specified IAM role. When you attach a managed policy to a role, the managed policy becomes part of the role's permission (access) policy.

    You cannot use a managed policy as the role's trust policy. The role's trust policy is created at the same time as the role, using CreateRole. You can update a role's trust policy using UpdateAssumeRolePolicy.

    Use this operation to attach a managed policy to a role. To embed an inline policy in a role, use PutRolePolicy. For more information about policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    As a best practice, you can validate your IAM policies. To learn more, see Validating IAM policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Attaches the specified managed policy to the specified IAM role. When you attach a managed policy to a role, the managed policy becomes part of the role's permission (access) policy.

    You cannot use a managed policy as the role's trust policy. The role's trust policy is created at the same time as the role, using CreateRole. You can update a role's trust policy using UpdateAssumeRolePolicy.

    Use this operation to attach a managed policy to a role. To embed an inline policy in a role, use PutRolePolicy. For more information about policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    As a best practice, you can validate your IAM policies. To learn more, see Validating IAM policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: AttachRolePolicyCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<AttachRolePolicyCommandOutput>

  • Attaches the specified managed policy to the specified IAM role. When you attach a managed policy to a role, the managed policy becomes part of the role's permission (access) policy.

    You cannot use a managed policy as the role's trust policy. The role's trust policy is created at the same time as the role, using CreateRole. You can update a role's trust policy using UpdateAssumeRolePolicy.

    Use this operation to attach a managed policy to a role. To embed an inline policy in a role, use PutRolePolicy. For more information about policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    As a best practice, you can validate your IAM policies. To learn more, see Validating IAM policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Attaches the specified managed policy to the specified IAM role. When you attach a managed policy to a role, the managed policy becomes part of the role's permission (access) policy.

    You cannot use a managed policy as the role's trust policy. The role's trust policy is created at the same time as the role, using CreateRole. You can update a role's trust policy using UpdateAssumeRolePolicy.

    Use this operation to attach a managed policy to a role. To embed an inline policy in a role, use PutRolePolicy. For more information about policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    As a best practice, you can validate your IAM policies. To learn more, see Validating IAM policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

attachUserPolicy

changePassword

  • Changes the password of the IAM user who is calling this operation. This operation can be performed using the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console. The Amazon Web Services account root user password is not affected by this operation.

    Use UpdateLoginProfile to use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to change the password for any IAM user. For more information about modifying passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<ChangePasswordCommandOutput>

  • Changes the password of the IAM user who is calling this operation. This operation can be performed using the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console. The Amazon Web Services account root user password is not affected by this operation.

    Use UpdateLoginProfile to use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to change the password for any IAM user. For more information about modifying passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Changes the password of the IAM user who is calling this operation. This operation can be performed using the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console. The Amazon Web Services account root user password is not affected by this operation.

    Use UpdateLoginProfile to use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to change the password for any IAM user. For more information about modifying passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Changes the password of the IAM user who is calling this operation. This operation can be performed using the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console. The Amazon Web Services account root user password is not affected by this operation.

    Use UpdateLoginProfile to use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to change the password for any IAM user. For more information about modifying passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: ChangePasswordCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<ChangePasswordCommandOutput>

  • Changes the password of the IAM user who is calling this operation. This operation can be performed using the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console. The Amazon Web Services account root user password is not affected by this operation.

    Use UpdateLoginProfile to use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to change the password for any IAM user. For more information about modifying passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Changes the password of the IAM user who is calling this operation. This operation can be performed using the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console. The Amazon Web Services account root user password is not affected by this operation.

    Use UpdateLoginProfile to use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to change the password for any IAM user. For more information about modifying passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createAccessKey

  • Creates a new Amazon Web Services secret access key and corresponding Amazon Web Services access key ID for the specified user. The default status for new keys is Active.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. This is true even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    For information about quotas on the number of keys you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    To ensure the security of your Amazon Web Services account, the secret access key is accessible only during key and user creation. You must save the key (for example, in a text file) if you want to be able to access it again. If a secret key is lost, you can delete the access keys for the associated user and then create new keys.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreateAccessKeyCommandOutput>

  • Creates a new Amazon Web Services secret access key and corresponding Amazon Web Services access key ID for the specified user. The default status for new keys is Active.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. This is true even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    For information about quotas on the number of keys you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    To ensure the security of your Amazon Web Services account, the secret access key is accessible only during key and user creation. You must save the key (for example, in a text file) if you want to be able to access it again. If a secret key is lost, you can delete the access keys for the associated user and then create new keys.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new Amazon Web Services secret access key and corresponding Amazon Web Services access key ID for the specified user. The default status for new keys is Active.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. This is true even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    For information about quotas on the number of keys you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    To ensure the security of your Amazon Web Services account, the secret access key is accessible only during key and user creation. You must save the key (for example, in a text file) if you want to be able to access it again. If a secret key is lost, you can delete the access keys for the associated user and then create new keys.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new Amazon Web Services secret access key and corresponding Amazon Web Services access key ID for the specified user. The default status for new keys is Active.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. This is true even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    For information about quotas on the number of keys you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    To ensure the security of your Amazon Web Services account, the secret access key is accessible only during key and user creation. You must save the key (for example, in a text file) if you want to be able to access it again. If a secret key is lost, you can delete the access keys for the associated user and then create new keys.

    Parameters

    • args: CreateAccessKeyCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreateAccessKeyCommandOutput>

  • Creates a new Amazon Web Services secret access key and corresponding Amazon Web Services access key ID for the specified user. The default status for new keys is Active.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. This is true even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    For information about quotas on the number of keys you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    To ensure the security of your Amazon Web Services account, the secret access key is accessible only during key and user creation. You must save the key (for example, in a text file) if you want to be able to access it again. If a secret key is lost, you can delete the access keys for the associated user and then create new keys.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new Amazon Web Services secret access key and corresponding Amazon Web Services access key ID for the specified user. The default status for new keys is Active.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials. This is true even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    For information about quotas on the number of keys you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    To ensure the security of your Amazon Web Services account, the secret access key is accessible only during key and user creation. You must save the key (for example, in a text file) if you want to be able to access it again. If a secret key is lost, you can delete the access keys for the associated user and then create new keys.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createAccountAlias

createGroup

createInstanceProfile

createLoginProfile

  • Creates a password for the specified IAM user. A password allows an IAM user to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to create a password for any IAM user. Use ChangePassword to update your own existing password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    For more information about managing passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreateLoginProfileCommandOutput>

  • Creates a password for the specified IAM user. A password allows an IAM user to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to create a password for any IAM user. Use ChangePassword to update your own existing password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    For more information about managing passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a password for the specified IAM user. A password allows an IAM user to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to create a password for any IAM user. Use ChangePassword to update your own existing password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    For more information about managing passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a password for the specified IAM user. A password allows an IAM user to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to create a password for any IAM user. Use ChangePassword to update your own existing password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    For more information about managing passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: CreateLoginProfileCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreateLoginProfileCommandOutput>

  • Creates a password for the specified IAM user. A password allows an IAM user to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to create a password for any IAM user. Use ChangePassword to update your own existing password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    For more information about managing passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a password for the specified IAM user. A password allows an IAM user to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to create a password for any IAM user. Use ChangePassword to update your own existing password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    For more information about managing passwords, see Managing passwords in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createOpenIDConnectProvider

  • Creates an IAM entity to describe an identity provider (IdP) that supports OpenID Connect (OIDC).

    The OIDC provider that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in a role's trust policy. Such a policy establishes a trust relationship between Amazon Web Services and the OIDC provider.

    If you are using an OIDC identity provider from Google, Facebook, or Amazon Cognito, you don't need to create a separate IAM identity provider. These OIDC identity providers are already built-in to Amazon Web Services and are available for your use. Instead, you can move directly to creating new roles using your identity provider. To learn more, see Creating a role for web identity or OpenID connect federation in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create the IAM OIDC provider, you specify the following:

    • The URL of the OIDC identity provider (IdP) to trust

    • A list of client IDs (also known as audiences) that identify the application or applications allowed to authenticate using the OIDC provider

    • A list of thumbprints of one or more server certificates that the IdP uses

    You get all of this information from the OIDC IdP you want to use to access Amazon Web Services.

    Amazon Web Services secures communication with some OIDC identity providers (IdPs) through our library of trusted certificate authorities (CAs) instead of using a certificate thumbprint to verify your IdP server certificate. These OIDC IdPs include Google, and those that use an Amazon S3 bucket to host a JSON Web Key Set (JWKS) endpoint. In these cases, your legacy thumbprint remains in your configuration, but is no longer used for validation.

    The trust for the OIDC provider is derived from the IAM provider that this operation creates. Therefore, it is best to limit access to the CreateOpenIDConnectProvider operation to highly privileged users.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreateOpenIDConnectProviderCommandOutput>

  • Creates an IAM entity to describe an identity provider (IdP) that supports OpenID Connect (OIDC).

    The OIDC provider that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in a role's trust policy. Such a policy establishes a trust relationship between Amazon Web Services and the OIDC provider.

    If you are using an OIDC identity provider from Google, Facebook, or Amazon Cognito, you don't need to create a separate IAM identity provider. These OIDC identity providers are already built-in to Amazon Web Services and are available for your use. Instead, you can move directly to creating new roles using your identity provider. To learn more, see Creating a role for web identity or OpenID connect federation in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create the IAM OIDC provider, you specify the following:

    • The URL of the OIDC identity provider (IdP) to trust

    • A list of client IDs (also known as audiences) that identify the application or applications allowed to authenticate using the OIDC provider

    • A list of thumbprints of one or more server certificates that the IdP uses

    You get all of this information from the OIDC IdP you want to use to access Amazon Web Services.

    Amazon Web Services secures communication with some OIDC identity providers (IdPs) through our library of trusted certificate authorities (CAs) instead of using a certificate thumbprint to verify your IdP server certificate. These OIDC IdPs include Google, and those that use an Amazon S3 bucket to host a JSON Web Key Set (JWKS) endpoint. In these cases, your legacy thumbprint remains in your configuration, but is no longer used for validation.

    The trust for the OIDC provider is derived from the IAM provider that this operation creates. Therefore, it is best to limit access to the CreateOpenIDConnectProvider operation to highly privileged users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM entity to describe an identity provider (IdP) that supports OpenID Connect (OIDC).

    The OIDC provider that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in a role's trust policy. Such a policy establishes a trust relationship between Amazon Web Services and the OIDC provider.

    If you are using an OIDC identity provider from Google, Facebook, or Amazon Cognito, you don't need to create a separate IAM identity provider. These OIDC identity providers are already built-in to Amazon Web Services and are available for your use. Instead, you can move directly to creating new roles using your identity provider. To learn more, see Creating a role for web identity or OpenID connect federation in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create the IAM OIDC provider, you specify the following:

    • The URL of the OIDC identity provider (IdP) to trust

    • A list of client IDs (also known as audiences) that identify the application or applications allowed to authenticate using the OIDC provider

    • A list of thumbprints of one or more server certificates that the IdP uses

    You get all of this information from the OIDC IdP you want to use to access Amazon Web Services.

    Amazon Web Services secures communication with some OIDC identity providers (IdPs) through our library of trusted certificate authorities (CAs) instead of using a certificate thumbprint to verify your IdP server certificate. These OIDC IdPs include Google, and those that use an Amazon S3 bucket to host a JSON Web Key Set (JWKS) endpoint. In these cases, your legacy thumbprint remains in your configuration, but is no longer used for validation.

    The trust for the OIDC provider is derived from the IAM provider that this operation creates. Therefore, it is best to limit access to the CreateOpenIDConnectProvider operation to highly privileged users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM entity to describe an identity provider (IdP) that supports OpenID Connect (OIDC).

    The OIDC provider that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in a role's trust policy. Such a policy establishes a trust relationship between Amazon Web Services and the OIDC provider.

    If you are using an OIDC identity provider from Google, Facebook, or Amazon Cognito, you don't need to create a separate IAM identity provider. These OIDC identity providers are already built-in to Amazon Web Services and are available for your use. Instead, you can move directly to creating new roles using your identity provider. To learn more, see Creating a role for web identity or OpenID connect federation in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create the IAM OIDC provider, you specify the following:

    • The URL of the OIDC identity provider (IdP) to trust

    • A list of client IDs (also known as audiences) that identify the application or applications allowed to authenticate using the OIDC provider

    • A list of thumbprints of one or more server certificates that the IdP uses

    You get all of this information from the OIDC IdP you want to use to access Amazon Web Services.

    Amazon Web Services secures communication with some OIDC identity providers (IdPs) through our library of trusted certificate authorities (CAs) instead of using a certificate thumbprint to verify your IdP server certificate. These OIDC IdPs include Google, and those that use an Amazon S3 bucket to host a JSON Web Key Set (JWKS) endpoint. In these cases, your legacy thumbprint remains in your configuration, but is no longer used for validation.

    The trust for the OIDC provider is derived from the IAM provider that this operation creates. Therefore, it is best to limit access to the CreateOpenIDConnectProvider operation to highly privileged users.

    Parameters

    • args: CreateOpenIDConnectProviderCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreateOpenIDConnectProviderCommandOutput>

  • Creates an IAM entity to describe an identity provider (IdP) that supports OpenID Connect (OIDC).

    The OIDC provider that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in a role's trust policy. Such a policy establishes a trust relationship between Amazon Web Services and the OIDC provider.

    If you are using an OIDC identity provider from Google, Facebook, or Amazon Cognito, you don't need to create a separate IAM identity provider. These OIDC identity providers are already built-in to Amazon Web Services and are available for your use. Instead, you can move directly to creating new roles using your identity provider. To learn more, see Creating a role for web identity or OpenID connect federation in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create the IAM OIDC provider, you specify the following:

    • The URL of the OIDC identity provider (IdP) to trust

    • A list of client IDs (also known as audiences) that identify the application or applications allowed to authenticate using the OIDC provider

    • A list of thumbprints of one or more server certificates that the IdP uses

    You get all of this information from the OIDC IdP you want to use to access Amazon Web Services.

    Amazon Web Services secures communication with some OIDC identity providers (IdPs) through our library of trusted certificate authorities (CAs) instead of using a certificate thumbprint to verify your IdP server certificate. These OIDC IdPs include Google, and those that use an Amazon S3 bucket to host a JSON Web Key Set (JWKS) endpoint. In these cases, your legacy thumbprint remains in your configuration, but is no longer used for validation.

    The trust for the OIDC provider is derived from the IAM provider that this operation creates. Therefore, it is best to limit access to the CreateOpenIDConnectProvider operation to highly privileged users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM entity to describe an identity provider (IdP) that supports OpenID Connect (OIDC).

    The OIDC provider that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in a role's trust policy. Such a policy establishes a trust relationship between Amazon Web Services and the OIDC provider.

    If you are using an OIDC identity provider from Google, Facebook, or Amazon Cognito, you don't need to create a separate IAM identity provider. These OIDC identity providers are already built-in to Amazon Web Services and are available for your use. Instead, you can move directly to creating new roles using your identity provider. To learn more, see Creating a role for web identity or OpenID connect federation in the IAM User Guide.

    When you create the IAM OIDC provider, you specify the following:

    • The URL of the OIDC identity provider (IdP) to trust

    • A list of client IDs (also known as audiences) that identify the application or applications allowed to authenticate using the OIDC provider

    • A list of thumbprints of one or more server certificates that the IdP uses

    You get all of this information from the OIDC IdP you want to use to access Amazon Web Services.

    Amazon Web Services secures communication with some OIDC identity providers (IdPs) through our library of trusted certificate authorities (CAs) instead of using a certificate thumbprint to verify your IdP server certificate. These OIDC IdPs include Google, and those that use an Amazon S3 bucket to host a JSON Web Key Set (JWKS) endpoint. In these cases, your legacy thumbprint remains in your configuration, but is no longer used for validation.

    The trust for the OIDC provider is derived from the IAM provider that this operation creates. Therefore, it is best to limit access to the CreateOpenIDConnectProvider operation to highly privileged users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createPolicy

createPolicyVersion

  • Creates a new version of the specified managed policy. To update a managed policy, you create a new policy version. A managed policy can have up to five versions. If the policy has five versions, you must delete an existing version using DeletePolicyVersion before you create a new version.

    Optionally, you can set the new version as the policy's default version. The default version is the version that is in effect for the IAM users, groups, and roles to which the policy is attached.

    For more information about managed policy versions, see Versioning for managed policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreatePolicyVersionCommandOutput>

  • Creates a new version of the specified managed policy. To update a managed policy, you create a new policy version. A managed policy can have up to five versions. If the policy has five versions, you must delete an existing version using DeletePolicyVersion before you create a new version.

    Optionally, you can set the new version as the policy's default version. The default version is the version that is in effect for the IAM users, groups, and roles to which the policy is attached.

    For more information about managed policy versions, see Versioning for managed policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new version of the specified managed policy. To update a managed policy, you create a new policy version. A managed policy can have up to five versions. If the policy has five versions, you must delete an existing version using DeletePolicyVersion before you create a new version.

    Optionally, you can set the new version as the policy's default version. The default version is the version that is in effect for the IAM users, groups, and roles to which the policy is attached.

    For more information about managed policy versions, see Versioning for managed policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new version of the specified managed policy. To update a managed policy, you create a new policy version. A managed policy can have up to five versions. If the policy has five versions, you must delete an existing version using DeletePolicyVersion before you create a new version.

    Optionally, you can set the new version as the policy's default version. The default version is the version that is in effect for the IAM users, groups, and roles to which the policy is attached.

    For more information about managed policy versions, see Versioning for managed policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: CreatePolicyVersionCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreatePolicyVersionCommandOutput>

  • Creates a new version of the specified managed policy. To update a managed policy, you create a new policy version. A managed policy can have up to five versions. If the policy has five versions, you must delete an existing version using DeletePolicyVersion before you create a new version.

    Optionally, you can set the new version as the policy's default version. The default version is the version that is in effect for the IAM users, groups, and roles to which the policy is attached.

    For more information about managed policy versions, see Versioning for managed policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new version of the specified managed policy. To update a managed policy, you create a new policy version. A managed policy can have up to five versions. If the policy has five versions, you must delete an existing version using DeletePolicyVersion before you create a new version.

    Optionally, you can set the new version as the policy's default version. The default version is the version that is in effect for the IAM users, groups, and roles to which the policy is attached.

    For more information about managed policy versions, see Versioning for managed policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createRole

createSAMLProvider

  • Creates an IAM resource that describes an identity provider (IdP) that supports SAML 2.0.

    The SAML provider resource that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in an IAM role's trust policy. Such a policy can enable federated users who sign in using the SAML IdP to assume the role. You can create an IAM role that supports Web-based single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Web Services Management Console or one that supports API access to Amazon Web Services.

    When you create the SAML provider resource, you upload a SAML metadata document that you get from your IdP. That document includes the issuer's name, expiration information, and keys that can be used to validate the SAML authentication response (assertions) that the IdP sends. You must generate the metadata document using the identity management software that is used as your organization's IdP.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    For more information, see Enabling SAML 2.0 federated users to access the Amazon Web Services Management Console and About SAML 2.0-based federation in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreateSAMLProviderCommandOutput>

  • Creates an IAM resource that describes an identity provider (IdP) that supports SAML 2.0.

    The SAML provider resource that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in an IAM role's trust policy. Such a policy can enable federated users who sign in using the SAML IdP to assume the role. You can create an IAM role that supports Web-based single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Web Services Management Console or one that supports API access to Amazon Web Services.

    When you create the SAML provider resource, you upload a SAML metadata document that you get from your IdP. That document includes the issuer's name, expiration information, and keys that can be used to validate the SAML authentication response (assertions) that the IdP sends. You must generate the metadata document using the identity management software that is used as your organization's IdP.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    For more information, see Enabling SAML 2.0 federated users to access the Amazon Web Services Management Console and About SAML 2.0-based federation in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM resource that describes an identity provider (IdP) that supports SAML 2.0.

    The SAML provider resource that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in an IAM role's trust policy. Such a policy can enable federated users who sign in using the SAML IdP to assume the role. You can create an IAM role that supports Web-based single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Web Services Management Console or one that supports API access to Amazon Web Services.

    When you create the SAML provider resource, you upload a SAML metadata document that you get from your IdP. That document includes the issuer's name, expiration information, and keys that can be used to validate the SAML authentication response (assertions) that the IdP sends. You must generate the metadata document using the identity management software that is used as your organization's IdP.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    For more information, see Enabling SAML 2.0 federated users to access the Amazon Web Services Management Console and About SAML 2.0-based federation in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM resource that describes an identity provider (IdP) that supports SAML 2.0.

    The SAML provider resource that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in an IAM role's trust policy. Such a policy can enable federated users who sign in using the SAML IdP to assume the role. You can create an IAM role that supports Web-based single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Web Services Management Console or one that supports API access to Amazon Web Services.

    When you create the SAML provider resource, you upload a SAML metadata document that you get from your IdP. That document includes the issuer's name, expiration information, and keys that can be used to validate the SAML authentication response (assertions) that the IdP sends. You must generate the metadata document using the identity management software that is used as your organization's IdP.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    For more information, see Enabling SAML 2.0 federated users to access the Amazon Web Services Management Console and About SAML 2.0-based federation in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: CreateSAMLProviderCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreateSAMLProviderCommandOutput>

  • Creates an IAM resource that describes an identity provider (IdP) that supports SAML 2.0.

    The SAML provider resource that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in an IAM role's trust policy. Such a policy can enable federated users who sign in using the SAML IdP to assume the role. You can create an IAM role that supports Web-based single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Web Services Management Console or one that supports API access to Amazon Web Services.

    When you create the SAML provider resource, you upload a SAML metadata document that you get from your IdP. That document includes the issuer's name, expiration information, and keys that can be used to validate the SAML authentication response (assertions) that the IdP sends. You must generate the metadata document using the identity management software that is used as your organization's IdP.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    For more information, see Enabling SAML 2.0 federated users to access the Amazon Web Services Management Console and About SAML 2.0-based federation in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM resource that describes an identity provider (IdP) that supports SAML 2.0.

    The SAML provider resource that you create with this operation can be used as a principal in an IAM role's trust policy. Such a policy can enable federated users who sign in using the SAML IdP to assume the role. You can create an IAM role that supports Web-based single sign-on (SSO) to the Amazon Web Services Management Console or one that supports API access to Amazon Web Services.

    When you create the SAML provider resource, you upload a SAML metadata document that you get from your IdP. That document includes the issuer's name, expiration information, and keys that can be used to validate the SAML authentication response (assertions) that the IdP sends. You must generate the metadata document using the identity management software that is used as your organization's IdP.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    For more information, see Enabling SAML 2.0 federated users to access the Amazon Web Services Management Console and About SAML 2.0-based federation in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createServiceLinkedRole

  • Creates an IAM role that is linked to a specific Amazon Web Services service. The service controls the attached policies and when the role can be deleted. This helps ensure that the service is not broken by an unexpectedly changed or deleted role, which could put your Amazon Web Services resources into an unknown state. Allowing the service to control the role helps improve service stability and proper cleanup when a service and its role are no longer needed. For more information, see Using service-linked roles in the IAM User Guide.

    To attach a policy to this service-linked role, you must make the request using the Amazon Web Services service that depends on this role.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreateServiceLinkedRoleCommandOutput>

  • Creates an IAM role that is linked to a specific Amazon Web Services service. The service controls the attached policies and when the role can be deleted. This helps ensure that the service is not broken by an unexpectedly changed or deleted role, which could put your Amazon Web Services resources into an unknown state. Allowing the service to control the role helps improve service stability and proper cleanup when a service and its role are no longer needed. For more information, see Using service-linked roles in the IAM User Guide.

    To attach a policy to this service-linked role, you must make the request using the Amazon Web Services service that depends on this role.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM role that is linked to a specific Amazon Web Services service. The service controls the attached policies and when the role can be deleted. This helps ensure that the service is not broken by an unexpectedly changed or deleted role, which could put your Amazon Web Services resources into an unknown state. Allowing the service to control the role helps improve service stability and proper cleanup when a service and its role are no longer needed. For more information, see Using service-linked roles in the IAM User Guide.

    To attach a policy to this service-linked role, you must make the request using the Amazon Web Services service that depends on this role.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM role that is linked to a specific Amazon Web Services service. The service controls the attached policies and when the role can be deleted. This helps ensure that the service is not broken by an unexpectedly changed or deleted role, which could put your Amazon Web Services resources into an unknown state. Allowing the service to control the role helps improve service stability and proper cleanup when a service and its role are no longer needed. For more information, see Using service-linked roles in the IAM User Guide.

    To attach a policy to this service-linked role, you must make the request using the Amazon Web Services service that depends on this role.

    Parameters

    • args: CreateServiceLinkedRoleCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreateServiceLinkedRoleCommandOutput>

  • Creates an IAM role that is linked to a specific Amazon Web Services service. The service controls the attached policies and when the role can be deleted. This helps ensure that the service is not broken by an unexpectedly changed or deleted role, which could put your Amazon Web Services resources into an unknown state. Allowing the service to control the role helps improve service stability and proper cleanup when a service and its role are no longer needed. For more information, see Using service-linked roles in the IAM User Guide.

    To attach a policy to this service-linked role, you must make the request using the Amazon Web Services service that depends on this role.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates an IAM role that is linked to a specific Amazon Web Services service. The service controls the attached policies and when the role can be deleted. This helps ensure that the service is not broken by an unexpectedly changed or deleted role, which could put your Amazon Web Services resources into an unknown state. Allowing the service to control the role helps improve service stability and proper cleanup when a service and its role are no longer needed. For more information, see Using service-linked roles in the IAM User Guide.

    To attach a policy to this service-linked role, you must make the request using the Amazon Web Services service that depends on this role.

    Parameters

    Returns void

createServiceSpecificCredential

createUser

createVirtualMFADevice

  • Creates a new virtual MFA device for the Amazon Web Services account. After creating the virtual MFA, use EnableMFADevice to attach the MFA device to an IAM user. For more information about creating and working with virtual MFA devices, see Using a virtual MFA device in the IAM User Guide.

    For information about the maximum number of MFA devices you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    The seed information contained in the QR code and the Base32 string should be treated like any other secret access information. In other words, protect the seed information as you would your Amazon Web Services access keys or your passwords. After you provision your virtual device, you should ensure that the information is destroyed following secure procedures.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<CreateVirtualMFADeviceCommandOutput>

  • Creates a new virtual MFA device for the Amazon Web Services account. After creating the virtual MFA, use EnableMFADevice to attach the MFA device to an IAM user. For more information about creating and working with virtual MFA devices, see Using a virtual MFA device in the IAM User Guide.

    For information about the maximum number of MFA devices you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    The seed information contained in the QR code and the Base32 string should be treated like any other secret access information. In other words, protect the seed information as you would your Amazon Web Services access keys or your passwords. After you provision your virtual device, you should ensure that the information is destroyed following secure procedures.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new virtual MFA device for the Amazon Web Services account. After creating the virtual MFA, use EnableMFADevice to attach the MFA device to an IAM user. For more information about creating and working with virtual MFA devices, see Using a virtual MFA device in the IAM User Guide.

    For information about the maximum number of MFA devices you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    The seed information contained in the QR code and the Base32 string should be treated like any other secret access information. In other words, protect the seed information as you would your Amazon Web Services access keys or your passwords. After you provision your virtual device, you should ensure that the information is destroyed following secure procedures.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new virtual MFA device for the Amazon Web Services account. After creating the virtual MFA, use EnableMFADevice to attach the MFA device to an IAM user. For more information about creating and working with virtual MFA devices, see Using a virtual MFA device in the IAM User Guide.

    For information about the maximum number of MFA devices you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    The seed information contained in the QR code and the Base32 string should be treated like any other secret access information. In other words, protect the seed information as you would your Amazon Web Services access keys or your passwords. After you provision your virtual device, you should ensure that the information is destroyed following secure procedures.

    Parameters

    • args: CreateVirtualMFADeviceCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<CreateVirtualMFADeviceCommandOutput>

  • Creates a new virtual MFA device for the Amazon Web Services account. After creating the virtual MFA, use EnableMFADevice to attach the MFA device to an IAM user. For more information about creating and working with virtual MFA devices, see Using a virtual MFA device in the IAM User Guide.

    For information about the maximum number of MFA devices you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    The seed information contained in the QR code and the Base32 string should be treated like any other secret access information. In other words, protect the seed information as you would your Amazon Web Services access keys or your passwords. After you provision your virtual device, you should ensure that the information is destroyed following secure procedures.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Creates a new virtual MFA device for the Amazon Web Services account. After creating the virtual MFA, use EnableMFADevice to attach the MFA device to an IAM user. For more information about creating and working with virtual MFA devices, see Using a virtual MFA device in the IAM User Guide.

    For information about the maximum number of MFA devices you can create, see IAM and STS quotas in the IAM User Guide.

    The seed information contained in the QR code and the Base32 string should be treated like any other secret access information. In other words, protect the seed information as you would your Amazon Web Services access keys or your passwords. After you provision your virtual device, you should ensure that the information is destroyed following secure procedures.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deactivateMFADevice

deleteAccessKey

  • Deletes the access key pair associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteAccessKeyCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the access key pair associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the access key pair associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the access key pair associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteAccessKeyCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteAccessKeyCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the access key pair associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the access key pair associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteAccountAlias

deleteAccountPasswordPolicy

deleteGroup

deleteGroupPolicy

deleteInstanceProfile

  • Deletes the specified instance profile. The instance profile must not have an associated role.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the instance profile you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    For more information about instance profiles, see About instance profiles.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteInstanceProfileCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified instance profile. The instance profile must not have an associated role.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the instance profile you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    For more information about instance profiles, see About instance profiles.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified instance profile. The instance profile must not have an associated role.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the instance profile you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    For more information about instance profiles, see About instance profiles.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified instance profile. The instance profile must not have an associated role.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the instance profile you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    For more information about instance profiles, see About instance profiles.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteInstanceProfileCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteInstanceProfileCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified instance profile. The instance profile must not have an associated role.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the instance profile you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    For more information about instance profiles, see About instance profiles.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified instance profile. The instance profile must not have an associated role.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the instance profile you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    For more information about instance profiles, see About instance profiles.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteLoginProfile

  • Deletes the password for the specified IAM user, which terminates the user's ability to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to delete a password for any IAM user. You can use ChangePassword to update, but not delete, your own password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    Deleting a user's password does not prevent a user from accessing Amazon Web Services through the command line interface or the API. To prevent all user access, you must also either make any access keys inactive or delete them. For more information about making keys inactive or deleting them, see UpdateAccessKey and DeleteAccessKey.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteLoginProfileCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the password for the specified IAM user, which terminates the user's ability to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to delete a password for any IAM user. You can use ChangePassword to update, but not delete, your own password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    Deleting a user's password does not prevent a user from accessing Amazon Web Services through the command line interface or the API. To prevent all user access, you must also either make any access keys inactive or delete them. For more information about making keys inactive or deleting them, see UpdateAccessKey and DeleteAccessKey.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the password for the specified IAM user, which terminates the user's ability to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to delete a password for any IAM user. You can use ChangePassword to update, but not delete, your own password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    Deleting a user's password does not prevent a user from accessing Amazon Web Services through the command line interface or the API. To prevent all user access, you must also either make any access keys inactive or delete them. For more information about making keys inactive or deleting them, see UpdateAccessKey and DeleteAccessKey.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the password for the specified IAM user, which terminates the user's ability to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to delete a password for any IAM user. You can use ChangePassword to update, but not delete, your own password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    Deleting a user's password does not prevent a user from accessing Amazon Web Services through the command line interface or the API. To prevent all user access, you must also either make any access keys inactive or delete them. For more information about making keys inactive or deleting them, see UpdateAccessKey and DeleteAccessKey.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteLoginProfileCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteLoginProfileCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the password for the specified IAM user, which terminates the user's ability to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to delete a password for any IAM user. You can use ChangePassword to update, but not delete, your own password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    Deleting a user's password does not prevent a user from accessing Amazon Web Services through the command line interface or the API. To prevent all user access, you must also either make any access keys inactive or delete them. For more information about making keys inactive or deleting them, see UpdateAccessKey and DeleteAccessKey.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the password for the specified IAM user, which terminates the user's ability to access Amazon Web Services services through the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    You can use the CLI, the Amazon Web Services API, or the Users page in the IAM console to delete a password for any IAM user. You can use ChangePassword to update, but not delete, your own password in the My Security Credentials page in the Amazon Web Services Management Console.

    Deleting a user's password does not prevent a user from accessing Amazon Web Services through the command line interface or the API. To prevent all user access, you must also either make any access keys inactive or delete them. For more information about making keys inactive or deleting them, see UpdateAccessKey and DeleteAccessKey.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteOpenIDConnectProvider

  • Deletes an OpenID Connect identity provider (IdP) resource object in IAM.

    Deleting an IAM OIDC provider resource does not update any roles that reference the provider as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a deleted provider fails.

    This operation is idempotent; it does not fail or return an error if you call the operation for a provider that does not exist.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteOpenIDConnectProviderCommandOutput>

  • Deletes an OpenID Connect identity provider (IdP) resource object in IAM.

    Deleting an IAM OIDC provider resource does not update any roles that reference the provider as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a deleted provider fails.

    This operation is idempotent; it does not fail or return an error if you call the operation for a provider that does not exist.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes an OpenID Connect identity provider (IdP) resource object in IAM.

    Deleting an IAM OIDC provider resource does not update any roles that reference the provider as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a deleted provider fails.

    This operation is idempotent; it does not fail or return an error if you call the operation for a provider that does not exist.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes an OpenID Connect identity provider (IdP) resource object in IAM.

    Deleting an IAM OIDC provider resource does not update any roles that reference the provider as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a deleted provider fails.

    This operation is idempotent; it does not fail or return an error if you call the operation for a provider that does not exist.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteOpenIDConnectProviderCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteOpenIDConnectProviderCommandOutput>

  • Deletes an OpenID Connect identity provider (IdP) resource object in IAM.

    Deleting an IAM OIDC provider resource does not update any roles that reference the provider as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a deleted provider fails.

    This operation is idempotent; it does not fail or return an error if you call the operation for a provider that does not exist.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes an OpenID Connect identity provider (IdP) resource object in IAM.

    Deleting an IAM OIDC provider resource does not update any roles that reference the provider as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a deleted provider fails.

    This operation is idempotent; it does not fail or return an error if you call the operation for a provider that does not exist.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deletePolicy

  • Deletes the specified managed policy.

    Before you can delete a managed policy, you must first detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that it is attached to. In addition, you must delete all the policy's versions. The following steps describe the process for deleting a managed policy:

    • Detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that the policy is attached to, using DetachUserPolicy, DetachGroupPolicy, or DetachRolePolicy. To list all the users, groups, and roles that a policy is attached to, use ListEntitiesForPolicy.

    • Delete all versions of the policy using DeletePolicyVersion. To list the policy's versions, use ListPolicyVersions. You cannot use DeletePolicyVersion to delete the version that is marked as the default version. You delete the policy's default version in the next step of the process.

    • Delete the policy (this automatically deletes the policy's default version) using this operation.

    For information about managed policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeletePolicyCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified managed policy.

    Before you can delete a managed policy, you must first detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that it is attached to. In addition, you must delete all the policy's versions. The following steps describe the process for deleting a managed policy:

    • Detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that the policy is attached to, using DetachUserPolicy, DetachGroupPolicy, or DetachRolePolicy. To list all the users, groups, and roles that a policy is attached to, use ListEntitiesForPolicy.

    • Delete all versions of the policy using DeletePolicyVersion. To list the policy's versions, use ListPolicyVersions. You cannot use DeletePolicyVersion to delete the version that is marked as the default version. You delete the policy's default version in the next step of the process.

    • Delete the policy (this automatically deletes the policy's default version) using this operation.

    For information about managed policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified managed policy.

    Before you can delete a managed policy, you must first detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that it is attached to. In addition, you must delete all the policy's versions. The following steps describe the process for deleting a managed policy:

    • Detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that the policy is attached to, using DetachUserPolicy, DetachGroupPolicy, or DetachRolePolicy. To list all the users, groups, and roles that a policy is attached to, use ListEntitiesForPolicy.

    • Delete all versions of the policy using DeletePolicyVersion. To list the policy's versions, use ListPolicyVersions. You cannot use DeletePolicyVersion to delete the version that is marked as the default version. You delete the policy's default version in the next step of the process.

    • Delete the policy (this automatically deletes the policy's default version) using this operation.

    For information about managed policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified managed policy.

    Before you can delete a managed policy, you must first detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that it is attached to. In addition, you must delete all the policy's versions. The following steps describe the process for deleting a managed policy:

    • Detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that the policy is attached to, using DetachUserPolicy, DetachGroupPolicy, or DetachRolePolicy. To list all the users, groups, and roles that a policy is attached to, use ListEntitiesForPolicy.

    • Delete all versions of the policy using DeletePolicyVersion. To list the policy's versions, use ListPolicyVersions. You cannot use DeletePolicyVersion to delete the version that is marked as the default version. You delete the policy's default version in the next step of the process.

    • Delete the policy (this automatically deletes the policy's default version) using this operation.

    For information about managed policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: DeletePolicyCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeletePolicyCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified managed policy.

    Before you can delete a managed policy, you must first detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that it is attached to. In addition, you must delete all the policy's versions. The following steps describe the process for deleting a managed policy:

    • Detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that the policy is attached to, using DetachUserPolicy, DetachGroupPolicy, or DetachRolePolicy. To list all the users, groups, and roles that a policy is attached to, use ListEntitiesForPolicy.

    • Delete all versions of the policy using DeletePolicyVersion. To list the policy's versions, use ListPolicyVersions. You cannot use DeletePolicyVersion to delete the version that is marked as the default version. You delete the policy's default version in the next step of the process.

    • Delete the policy (this automatically deletes the policy's default version) using this operation.

    For information about managed policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified managed policy.

    Before you can delete a managed policy, you must first detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that it is attached to. In addition, you must delete all the policy's versions. The following steps describe the process for deleting a managed policy:

    • Detach the policy from all users, groups, and roles that the policy is attached to, using DetachUserPolicy, DetachGroupPolicy, or DetachRolePolicy. To list all the users, groups, and roles that a policy is attached to, use ListEntitiesForPolicy.

    • Delete all versions of the policy using DeletePolicyVersion. To list the policy's versions, use ListPolicyVersions. You cannot use DeletePolicyVersion to delete the version that is marked as the default version. You delete the policy's default version in the next step of the process.

    • Delete the policy (this automatically deletes the policy's default version) using this operation.

    For information about managed policies, see Managed policies and inline policies in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deletePolicyVersion

deleteRole

  • Deletes the specified role. The role must not have any policies attached. For more information about roles, see Working with roles.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the role you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteRoleCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified role. The role must not have any policies attached. For more information about roles, see Working with roles.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the role you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified role. The role must not have any policies attached. For more information about roles, see Working with roles.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the role you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified role. The role must not have any policies attached. For more information about roles, see Working with roles.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the role you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteRoleCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteRoleCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified role. The role must not have any policies attached. For more information about roles, see Working with roles.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the role you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified role. The role must not have any policies attached. For more information about roles, see Working with roles.

    Make sure that you do not have any Amazon EC2 instances running with the role you are about to delete. Deleting a role or instance profile that is associated with a running instance will break any applications running on the instance.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteRolePermissionsBoundary

deleteRolePolicy

deleteSAMLProvider

  • Deletes a SAML provider resource in IAM.

    Deleting the provider resource from IAM does not update any roles that reference the SAML provider resource's ARN as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a non-existent provider resource ARN fails.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteSAMLProviderCommandOutput>

  • Deletes a SAML provider resource in IAM.

    Deleting the provider resource from IAM does not update any roles that reference the SAML provider resource's ARN as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a non-existent provider resource ARN fails.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes a SAML provider resource in IAM.

    Deleting the provider resource from IAM does not update any roles that reference the SAML provider resource's ARN as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a non-existent provider resource ARN fails.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes a SAML provider resource in IAM.

    Deleting the provider resource from IAM does not update any roles that reference the SAML provider resource's ARN as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a non-existent provider resource ARN fails.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteSAMLProviderCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteSAMLProviderCommandOutput>

  • Deletes a SAML provider resource in IAM.

    Deleting the provider resource from IAM does not update any roles that reference the SAML provider resource's ARN as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a non-existent provider resource ARN fails.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes a SAML provider resource in IAM.

    Deleting the provider resource from IAM does not update any roles that reference the SAML provider resource's ARN as a principal in their trust policies. Any attempt to assume a role that references a non-existent provider resource ARN fails.

    This operation requires Signature Version 4.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteSSHPublicKey

deleteServerCertificate

  • Deletes the specified server certificate.

    For more information about working with server certificates, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide. This topic also includes a list of Amazon Web Services services that can use the server certificates that you manage with IAM.

    If you are using a server certificate with Elastic Load Balancing, deleting the certificate could have implications for your application. If Elastic Load Balancing doesn't detect the deletion of bound certificates, it may continue to use the certificates. This could cause Elastic Load Balancing to stop accepting traffic. We recommend that you remove the reference to the certificate from Elastic Load Balancing before using this command to delete the certificate. For more information, see DeleteLoadBalancerListeners in the Elastic Load Balancing API Reference.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteServerCertificateCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified server certificate.

    For more information about working with server certificates, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide. This topic also includes a list of Amazon Web Services services that can use the server certificates that you manage with IAM.

    If you are using a server certificate with Elastic Load Balancing, deleting the certificate could have implications for your application. If Elastic Load Balancing doesn't detect the deletion of bound certificates, it may continue to use the certificates. This could cause Elastic Load Balancing to stop accepting traffic. We recommend that you remove the reference to the certificate from Elastic Load Balancing before using this command to delete the certificate. For more information, see DeleteLoadBalancerListeners in the Elastic Load Balancing API Reference.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified server certificate.

    For more information about working with server certificates, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide. This topic also includes a list of Amazon Web Services services that can use the server certificates that you manage with IAM.

    If you are using a server certificate with Elastic Load Balancing, deleting the certificate could have implications for your application. If Elastic Load Balancing doesn't detect the deletion of bound certificates, it may continue to use the certificates. This could cause Elastic Load Balancing to stop accepting traffic. We recommend that you remove the reference to the certificate from Elastic Load Balancing before using this command to delete the certificate. For more information, see DeleteLoadBalancerListeners in the Elastic Load Balancing API Reference.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified server certificate.

    For more information about working with server certificates, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide. This topic also includes a list of Amazon Web Services services that can use the server certificates that you manage with IAM.

    If you are using a server certificate with Elastic Load Balancing, deleting the certificate could have implications for your application. If Elastic Load Balancing doesn't detect the deletion of bound certificates, it may continue to use the certificates. This could cause Elastic Load Balancing to stop accepting traffic. We recommend that you remove the reference to the certificate from Elastic Load Balancing before using this command to delete the certificate. For more information, see DeleteLoadBalancerListeners in the Elastic Load Balancing API Reference.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteServerCertificateCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteServerCertificateCommandOutput>

  • Deletes the specified server certificate.

    For more information about working with server certificates, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide. This topic also includes a list of Amazon Web Services services that can use the server certificates that you manage with IAM.

    If you are using a server certificate with Elastic Load Balancing, deleting the certificate could have implications for your application. If Elastic Load Balancing doesn't detect the deletion of bound certificates, it may continue to use the certificates. This could cause Elastic Load Balancing to stop accepting traffic. We recommend that you remove the reference to the certificate from Elastic Load Balancing before using this command to delete the certificate. For more information, see DeleteLoadBalancerListeners in the Elastic Load Balancing API Reference.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes the specified server certificate.

    For more information about working with server certificates, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide. This topic also includes a list of Amazon Web Services services that can use the server certificates that you manage with IAM.

    If you are using a server certificate with Elastic Load Balancing, deleting the certificate could have implications for your application. If Elastic Load Balancing doesn't detect the deletion of bound certificates, it may continue to use the certificates. This could cause Elastic Load Balancing to stop accepting traffic. We recommend that you remove the reference to the certificate from Elastic Load Balancing before using this command to delete the certificate. For more information, see DeleteLoadBalancerListeners in the Elastic Load Balancing API Reference.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteServiceLinkedRole

  • Submits a service-linked role deletion request and returns a DeletionTaskId, which you can use to check the status of the deletion. Before you call this operation, confirm that the role has no active sessions and that any resources used by the role in the linked service are deleted. If you call this operation more than once for the same service-linked role and an earlier deletion task is not complete, then the DeletionTaskId of the earlier request is returned.

    If you submit a deletion request for a service-linked role whose linked service is still accessing a resource, then the deletion task fails. If it fails, the GetServiceLinkedRoleDeletionStatus operation returns the reason for the failure, usually including the resources that must be deleted. To delete the service-linked role, you must first remove those resources from the linked service and then submit the deletion request again. Resources are specific to the service that is linked to the role. For more information about removing resources from a service, see the Amazon Web Services documentation for your service.

    For more information about service-linked roles, see Roles terms and concepts: Amazon Web Services service-linked role in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteServiceLinkedRoleCommandOutput>

  • Submits a service-linked role deletion request and returns a DeletionTaskId, which you can use to check the status of the deletion. Before you call this operation, confirm that the role has no active sessions and that any resources used by the role in the linked service are deleted. If you call this operation more than once for the same service-linked role and an earlier deletion task is not complete, then the DeletionTaskId of the earlier request is returned.

    If you submit a deletion request for a service-linked role whose linked service is still accessing a resource, then the deletion task fails. If it fails, the GetServiceLinkedRoleDeletionStatus operation returns the reason for the failure, usually including the resources that must be deleted. To delete the service-linked role, you must first remove those resources from the linked service and then submit the deletion request again. Resources are specific to the service that is linked to the role. For more information about removing resources from a service, see the Amazon Web Services documentation for your service.

    For more information about service-linked roles, see Roles terms and concepts: Amazon Web Services service-linked role in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Submits a service-linked role deletion request and returns a DeletionTaskId, which you can use to check the status of the deletion. Before you call this operation, confirm that the role has no active sessions and that any resources used by the role in the linked service are deleted. If you call this operation more than once for the same service-linked role and an earlier deletion task is not complete, then the DeletionTaskId of the earlier request is returned.

    If you submit a deletion request for a service-linked role whose linked service is still accessing a resource, then the deletion task fails. If it fails, the GetServiceLinkedRoleDeletionStatus operation returns the reason for the failure, usually including the resources that must be deleted. To delete the service-linked role, you must first remove those resources from the linked service and then submit the deletion request again. Resources are specific to the service that is linked to the role. For more information about removing resources from a service, see the Amazon Web Services documentation for your service.

    For more information about service-linked roles, see Roles terms and concepts: Amazon Web Services service-linked role in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Submits a service-linked role deletion request and returns a DeletionTaskId, which you can use to check the status of the deletion. Before you call this operation, confirm that the role has no active sessions and that any resources used by the role in the linked service are deleted. If you call this operation more than once for the same service-linked role and an earlier deletion task is not complete, then the DeletionTaskId of the earlier request is returned.

    If you submit a deletion request for a service-linked role whose linked service is still accessing a resource, then the deletion task fails. If it fails, the GetServiceLinkedRoleDeletionStatus operation returns the reason for the failure, usually including the resources that must be deleted. To delete the service-linked role, you must first remove those resources from the linked service and then submit the deletion request again. Resources are specific to the service that is linked to the role. For more information about removing resources from a service, see the Amazon Web Services documentation for your service.

    For more information about service-linked roles, see Roles terms and concepts: Amazon Web Services service-linked role in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteServiceLinkedRoleCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteServiceLinkedRoleCommandOutput>

  • Submits a service-linked role deletion request and returns a DeletionTaskId, which you can use to check the status of the deletion. Before you call this operation, confirm that the role has no active sessions and that any resources used by the role in the linked service are deleted. If you call this operation more than once for the same service-linked role and an earlier deletion task is not complete, then the DeletionTaskId of the earlier request is returned.

    If you submit a deletion request for a service-linked role whose linked service is still accessing a resource, then the deletion task fails. If it fails, the GetServiceLinkedRoleDeletionStatus operation returns the reason for the failure, usually including the resources that must be deleted. To delete the service-linked role, you must first remove those resources from the linked service and then submit the deletion request again. Resources are specific to the service that is linked to the role. For more information about removing resources from a service, see the Amazon Web Services documentation for your service.

    For more information about service-linked roles, see Roles terms and concepts: Amazon Web Services service-linked role in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Submits a service-linked role deletion request and returns a DeletionTaskId, which you can use to check the status of the deletion. Before you call this operation, confirm that the role has no active sessions and that any resources used by the role in the linked service are deleted. If you call this operation more than once for the same service-linked role and an earlier deletion task is not complete, then the DeletionTaskId of the earlier request is returned.

    If you submit a deletion request for a service-linked role whose linked service is still accessing a resource, then the deletion task fails. If it fails, the GetServiceLinkedRoleDeletionStatus operation returns the reason for the failure, usually including the resources that must be deleted. To delete the service-linked role, you must first remove those resources from the linked service and then submit the deletion request again. Resources are specific to the service that is linked to the role. For more information about removing resources from a service, see the Amazon Web Services documentation for your service.

    For more information about service-linked roles, see Roles terms and concepts: Amazon Web Services service-linked role in the IAM User Guide.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteServiceSpecificCredential

deleteSigningCertificate

  • Deletes a signing certificate associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated IAM users.

    Parameters

    Returns Promise<DeleteSigningCertificateCommandOutput>

  • Deletes a signing certificate associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated IAM users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes a signing certificate associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated IAM users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes a signing certificate associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated IAM users.

    Parameters

    • args: DeleteSigningCertificateCommandInput
    • Optional options: __HttpHandlerOptions

    Returns Promise<DeleteSigningCertificateCommandOutput>

  • Deletes a signing certificate associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated IAM users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

  • Deletes a signing certificate associated with the specified IAM user.

    If you do not specify a user name, IAM determines the user name implicitly based on the Amazon Web Services access key ID signing the request. This operation works for access keys under the Amazon Web Services account. Consequently, you can use this operation to manage Amazon Web Services account root user credentials even if the Amazon Web Services account has no associated IAM users.

    Parameters

    Returns void

deleteUser

deleteUserPermissionsBoundary

deleteUserPolicy

deleteVirtualMFADevice