Amazon Simple Storage Service
Developer Guide (API Version 2006-03-01)

Example: Setting Up a Static Website Using a Custom Domain

Suppose that you want to host your static website on Amazon S3. You registered a domain (for example, example.com), and you want requests for http://www.example.com and http://example.com to be served from your Amazon S3 content. Whether you have an existing static website that you want to host on Amazon S3 or you are starting from scratch, you can use this example to learn how to host websites and create redirects on Amazon S3.

Before You Begin

As you follow the steps in this example, you work with the following services:

Amazon Route 53 – You use Route 53 to register domains and to define where you want to route internet traffic for your domain. The example shows how to create Route 53 alias records that route traffic for your domain (example.com) and subdomain (www.example.com) to an Amazon S3 bucket that contains an HTML file.

Amazon S3 – You use Amazon S3 to create buckets, upload a sample website page, configure permissions so that everyone can see the content, and then configure the buckets for website hosting.

Step 1: Register a Domain

If you don't already have a registered domain name, such as example.com, register one with Route 53. For more information, see Registering a New Domain in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. When you have a registered domain name, your next tasks are to create and configure Amazon S3 buckets for website hosting and to upload your website content.

Step 2: Create and Configure Buckets and Upload Website Content

To support requests from both the root domain (example.com) and subdomain (www.example.com), you create two buckets. You will host your content out of the root domain bucket (example.com), and you will create a redirect request for the subdomain bucket (www.example.com). The redirect request redirects users who try to access www.example.com to the root domain. In other words, if someone enters www.example.com in their browser, they are redirected to example.com and see the content that is hosted in the Amazon S3 bucket with that name.

Step 2.1: Create Two Buckets

The bucket names must match the name of the website that you are hosting. For example, to host your example.com website on Amazon S3, you would create a bucket named example.com. Like domains, subdomains must have their own S3 buckets, and the buckets must share the exact names as the subdomains. In this example, you create the www.example.com subdomain, so you also need an S3 bucket named www.example.com. Your website supports requests from both example.com and www.example.com.

In this step, you sign in to the Amazon S3 console with your AWS account credentials and create the following two buckets.

  • example.com

  • www.example.com

To create your buckets and upload your website content for hosting

For step-by-step instructions, see How Do I Create an S3 Bucket? in the Amazon Simple Storage Service Console User Guide.

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon S3 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/s3/.

  2. Create two buckets that match your domain name and subdomain (for example, example.com and www.example.com).

In the next step, you configure example.com for website hosting.

Step 2.2: Configure Your Root Domain Bucket for Website Hosting

In this step, you configure your root domain bucket (example.com) as a website. This bucket will contain your website content. When you configure a bucket for website hosting, you can access the website using the Amazon S3 assigned bucket website endpoint.

To configure your bucket for website hosting

  1. In the Amazon S3 console, in the S3 buckets list, choose the bucket with the same name as your domain.

    The bucket named after your domain contains the website content.

  2. Choose Properties.

  3. Choose Static website hosting.

  4. Choose Use this bucket to host a website.

  5. In the Index Document box, enter the name of your index page.

    The file name of the home page of a website is typically index.html, but you can give it any name. In Step 2.5: Upload Index and Website Content, you will upload the index.html document for your static website. If you have not created a website, the instructions for creating the index.html document are in Step 2.5: Upload Index and Website Content.

  6. Choose Save.

In the next step, you configure your subdomain (www.example.com) to redirect requests to your domain (example.com).

Step 2.3: Configure Your Subdomain Bucket for Website Redirect

Now that you have configured your root domain bucket for website hosting, you can configure your subdomain bucket to redirect all requests to the domain. In this example, all requests for www.example.com are redirected to example.com.

To redirect requests from www.example.com to example.com

  1. In the Amazon S3 console, in the S3 buckets list, choose your subdomain bucket ( www.example.com, in this example).

  2. Choose Properties.

  3. Choose Static website hosting.

  4. Choose Redirect requests.

  5. In the Target bucket or domain box, enter your domain (for example, example.com).

  6. In the Protocol box, enter http.

  7. Choose Save.

Step 2.4: Configure Logging for Website Traffic

Optionally, you can configure logging to track the number of visitors accessing your website. To do that, you enable logging for the root domain bucket. For more information, see (Optional) Configuring Web Traffic Logging.

Step 2.5: Upload Index and Website Content

Now that you've configured your root domain bucket for website hosting and your subdomain bucket for redirect, you can upload your index document and optional website content to your root domain bucket. The content can be text files, family photos, videos—whatever you want. If you have not yet created a website, then you only need the index file for this example. In Step 2.2: Configure Your Root Domain Bucket for Website Hosting, you entered the name of the index document. The HTML file that you upload to your bucket to serve as your website index must have the same file name.

You can create your index.html file with the following HTML and then upload it to the bucket that will host the website. In this example, you upload the index.html document to the domain bucket (example.com) that will serve the website content.

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" > <head> <title>My Website Home Page</title> </head> <body> <h1>Welcome to my website</h1> <p>Now hosted on Amazon S3!</p> </body> </html>

To upload your index and website content

  1. Upload your index document to the root domain bucket (for example, example.com).

  2. (Optional) Upload your website content to the root domain bucket (for example, example.com).

For step-by-step instructions, see How Do I Upload an Object to an S3 Bucket? in the Amazon Simple Storage Service Console User Guide.

Step 2.6: Edit Block Public Access Settings

The bucket that you use to host a website must have public read access. It is intentional that everyone in the world will have read access to this bucket. By default, Amazon S3 blocks public access to your account and buckets. To grant public read access, you must disable block public access for the bucket and write a bucket policy that allows public read access. In this example, example.com contains the website content. Therefore, you need to make this bucket publically readable.

Warning

When you turn off all block public access settings and add a bucket policy that enables public read access to a bucket, the bucket can be publically accessed by anyone connected to the internet. Confirm your intent to make your bucket public.

To edit block public access settings

  1. Select the domain bucket (for example, example.com), and choose Edit public access settings.

  2. Clear Block all public access, and choose Save.

    
							Screenshot of block public access settings showing the block all
								public access check box cleared.
  3. Confirm your changes.

    Under S3 buckets, the Access for your bucket updates to Objects can be public. You can now add a bucket policy to make the objects in the bucket publicly readable. If Access still appears as Bucket and objects not public, you might have to edit the block public access settings for your account.

Step 2.7: Attach a Bucket Policy

After you edit block public access settings for your root domain bucket, you can attach a bucket policy that grants public read access. You should add the bucket policy to the root domain bucket that contains your website content, the same bucket for which you turned off block all public access. In this example, you attach a bucket policy to the example.com bucket.

  • To grant public read access, attach the following bucket policy to the bucket you use to host your website, substituting the name of your bucket for example.com.

    For step-by-step instructions to attach a bucket policy, see How Do I Add an S3 Bucket Policy? in the Amazon Simple Storage Service Console User Guide.

    { "Version":"2012-10-17", "Statement":[ { "Sid":"PublicReadGetObject", "Effect":"Allow", "Principal":"*", "Action":[ "s3:GetObject" ], "Resource":[ "arn:aws:s3:::example.com/*" ] } ] }

    After you add a bucket policy, under S3 buckets, the Access for your bucket updates to Public. If the Access appears as Only authorized users of this account, you might have to edit the block public access settings for your account.

    Important

    The preceding policy is an example only and allows full access to the contents of your bucket. For more information about security best practices, see How can I secure the files in my Amazon S3 bucket?

    In the next step, you can figure out your website endpoints and test your domain endpoint.

Step 2.8: Get Your Endpoints and Test Your Domain Endpoint

After you configure your domain bucket to host a public website and your subdomain bucket to redirect, you can figure out your website endpoints and test your domain endpoint. For more information about how to figure out your website endpoint, see Website Endpoints. If the example.com domain bucket resides in the US West (Oregon) Region, the Amazon S3 website endpoint would be as follows:

http://example.com.s3-website-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/

If the www.example.com subdomain bucket resides in the same Region, the endpoint would be as follows:

http://www.example.com.s3-website-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/

To test the domain endpoint

  • To test your domain endpoint, enter the endpoint URL in your browser.

    The browser should display the index document that you uploaded to the bucket.

In the next step, you use Amazon Route 53 to enable customers to use both of your custom URLs to navigate to your site.

Step 3: Add Alias Records for example.com and www.example.com

In this step, you create the alias records that you add to the hosted zone for your domain maps example.com and www.example.com. Instead of using IP addresses, the alias records use the Amazon S3 website endpoints. Amazon Route 53 maintains a mapping between the alias records and the IP addresses where the Amazon S3 buckets reside. You create two alias records, one for your root domain and one for your subdomain.

To add an Alias record for your root domain (example.com)

  1. Open the Route 53 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/route53/.

    Note

    If you don't already use Route 53, see Step 1: Register a Domain in the Amazon Route 53 Developer Guide. After completing your setup, you can resume the instructions.

  2. Choose Hosted Zones.

  3. In the list of hosted zones, choose the name of the hosted zone that matches your domain name.

  4. Choose Create Record Set.

  5. Specify the following values:

    Name

    Accept the default value, which is the name of your hosted zone and your domain.

    For the root domain, you do not need to enter any additional information in the Name field.

    Type

    Choose A – IPv4 address.

    Alias

    Choose Yes.

    Alias Target

    In the S3 website endpointssection of the list, choose the same bucket name that appears in the Name field, for example example.com(s3-website-us-west-2).

    Routing Policy

    Accept the default value of Simple.

    Evaluate Target Health

    Accept the default value of No.

    The screenshot below shows the alias record for the root domain, example.com:

    
						Screenshot showing record set for root domain.
  6. Choose Create.

To add an alias record for your subdomain (www.example.com)

  1. In the hosted zone for your root domain (example.com), choose Create Record Set.

  2. Specify the following values:

    Name

    For the subdomain, enter www in the box.

    Type

    Choose A – IPv4 address.

    Alias

    Choose Yes.

    Alias Target

    In the S3 website endpoints section of the list, choose the same bucket name that appears in the Name field, for example, www.example.com (s3-website-us-west-2)).

    Routing Policy

    Accept the default value of Simple.

    Evaluate Target Health

    Accept the default value of No.

    The screenshot below shows the alias record for www.example.com, the subdomain:

    
						Screenshot showing record set for subdomain.
  3. Choose Create.

Note

Changes generally propagate to all Route 53 servers within 60 seconds. When propagation is done, you'll be able to route traffic to your Amazon S3 bucket by using the names of the alias records that you created in this procedure.

Step 4: Test the Website

Verify that the website and the redirect work correctly. In your browser, enter your URLs. In this example, you try the following URLs:

  • http://example.com – Displays the index document in the example.com bucket.

  • http://www.example.com – Redirects your request to http://example.com. You see the index document in the example.com bucket.

In some cases, you might need to clear the cache of your web browser to see the expected behavior.