AWS global condition context keys - AWS Identity and Access Management

AWS global condition context keys

When a principal makes a request to AWS, AWS gathers the request information into a request context. You can use the Condition element of a JSON policy to compare keys in the request context with key values that you specify in your policy. Request information is provided by different sources, including the principal making the request, the resource the request is made against, and the metadata about the request itself.

Global condition keys can be used across all AWS services. While these condition keys can be used in all policies, the key is not available in every request context. For example, the aws:SourceAccount condition key is only available when the call to your resource is made directly by an AWS service principal. To learn more about the circumstances under which a global key is included in the request context, see the Availability information for each key.

Some individual services create their own condition keys that are available in the request context for other services. Cross-service condition keys are a type of global condition key that include a prefix matching the name of the service, such as ec2: or lambda:, but are available across other services.

Service-specific condition keys are defined for use with an individual AWS service. For example, Amazon S3 lets you write a policy with the s3:VersionId condition key to limit access to a specific version of an Amazon S3 object. This condition key is unique to the service, meaning it only works with requests to the Amazon S3 service. For condition keys that are service-specific, see Actions, Resources, and Condition Keys for AWS Services and choose the service whose keys you want to view.

Note

If you use condition keys that are available only in some circumstances, you can use the IfExists versions of the condition operators. If the condition keys are missing from a request context, the policy can fail the evaluation. For example, use the following condition block with ...IfExists operators to match when a request comes from a specific IP range or from a specific VPC. If either or both keys are not included in the request context, the condition still returns true. The values are only checked if the specified key is included in the request context. For more information about how a policy is evaluated when a key is not present for other operators, see Condition operators.

"Condition": { "IpAddressIfExists": {"aws:SourceIp" : ["xxx"] }, "StringEqualsIfExists" : {"aws:SourceVpc" : ["yyy"]} }
Important

To compare your condition against a request context with multiple key values, you must use the ForAllValues or ForAnyValue set operators. Use set operators only with multivalued condition keys. Do not use set operators with single-valued condition keys. For more information, see Multivalued context keys.

Properties of the principal

Use the following condition keys to compare details about the principal making the request with the principal properties that you specify in the policy. For a list of principals that can make requests, see Specifying a principal.

aws:PrincipalArn

Use this key to compare the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the principal that made the request with the ARN that you specify in the policy. For IAM roles, the request context returns the ARN of the role, not the ARN of the user that assumed the role.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context for all signed requests. Anonymous requests do not include this key. You can specify the following types of principals in this condition key:

    • IAM role

    • IAM user

    • AWS STS federated user session

    • AWS account root user

  • Data type – ARN, String

    AWS recommends that you use ARN operators instead of string operators when comparing ARNs.

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example values The following list shows the request context value returned for different types of principals that you can specify in the aws:PrincipalArn condition key:

    • IAM role – The request context contains the following value for condition key aws:PrincipalArn. Do not specify the assumed role session ARN as a value for this condition key. For more information about the assumed role session principal, see Role session principals.

      arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/role-name
    • IAM user – The request context contains the following value for condition key aws:PrincipalArn.

      arn:aws:iam::123456789012:user/user-name
    • AWS STS federated user sessions – The request context contains the following value for condition key aws:PrincipalArn.

      arn:aws:sts::123456789012:federated-user/user-name
    • AWS account root user – The request context contains the following value for condition key aws:PrincipalArn. When you specify the root user ARN as the value for the aws:PrincipalArn condition key, it limits permissions only for the root user of the AWS account. This is different from specifying the root user ARN in the principal element of a resource-based policy, which delegates authority to the AWS account. For more information about specifying the root user ARN in the principal element of a resource-based policy, see AWS account principals.

      arn:aws:iam::123456789012:root

You can specify the root user ARN as a value for condition key aws:PrincipalArn in AWS Organizations service control policies (SCPs). SCPs are a type of organization policy used to manage permissions in your organization and affect only member accounts in the organization. An SCP restricts permissions for IAM users and roles in member accounts, including the member account's root user. For more information about the effect of SCPs on permissions, see SCP effects on permissions in the Organizations User Guide.

aws:PrincipalAccount

Use this key to compare the account to which the requesting principal belongs with the account identifier that you specify in the policy. For anonymous requests, the request context returns anonymous.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context for all requests, including anonymous requests.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

In the following example, access is denied except to principals with the account number 123456789012.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "DenyAccessFromPrincipalNotInSpecificAccount", "Action": "service:*", "Effect": "Deny", "Resource": [ "arn:aws:service:region:accountID:resource" ], "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:PrincipalAccount": [ "123456789012" ] } } } ] }

aws:PrincipalOrgPaths

Use this key to compare the AWS Organizations path for the principal who is making the request to the path in the policy. That principal can be an IAM user, IAM role, federated user, or AWS account root user. In a policy, this condition key ensures that the requester is an account member within the specified organization root or organizational units (OUs) in AWS Organizations. An AWS Organizations path is a text representation of the structure of an Organizations entity. For more information about using and understanding paths, see Understand the AWS Organizations entity path.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the principal is a member of an organization. Anonymous requests do not include this key.

  • Data typeString (list)

  • Value type – Multivalued

Note

Organization IDs are globally unique but OU IDs and root IDs are unique only within an organization. This means that no two organizations share the same organization ID. However, another organization might have an OU or root with the same ID as yours. We recommend that you always include the organization ID when you specify an OU or root.

For example, the following condition returns true for principals in accounts that are attached directly to the ou-ab12-22222222 OU, but not in its child OUs.

"Condition" : { "ForAnyValue:StringEquals" : { "aws:PrincipalOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-11111111/ou-ab12-22222222/"] }}

The following condition returns true for principals in an account that is attached directly to the OU or any of its child OUs. When you include a wildcard, you must use the StringLike condition operator.

"Condition" : { "ForAnyValue:StringLike" : { "aws:PrincipalOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-11111111/ou-ab12-22222222/*"] }}

The following condition returns true for principals in an account that is attached directly to any of the child OUs, but not directly to the parent OU. The previous condition is for the OU or any children. The following condition is for only the children (and any children of those children).

"Condition" : { "ForAnyValue:StringLike" : { "aws:PrincipalOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-11111111/ou-ab12-22222222/ou-*"] }}

The following condition allows access for every principal in the o-a1b2c3d4e5 organization, regardless of their parent OU.

"Condition" : { "ForAnyValue:StringLike" : { "aws:PrincipalOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/*"] }}

aws:PrincipalOrgPaths is a multivalued condition key. Multivalued keys can have multiple values in the request context. When you use multiple values with the ForAnyValue condition operator, the principal's path must match one of the paths listed in the policy. For more information about multivalued condition keys, see Multivalued context keys.

"Condition": { "ForAnyValue:StringLike": { "aws:PrincipalOrgPaths": [ "o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-33333333/*", "o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-22222222/*" ] } }

aws:PrincipalOrgID

Use this key to compare the identifier of the organization in AWS Organizations to which the requesting principal belongs with the identifier specified in the policy.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the principal is a member of an organization. Anonymous requests do not include this key.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

This global key provides an alternative to listing all the account IDs for all AWS accounts in an organization. You can use this condition key to simplify specifying the Principal element in a resource-based policy. You can specify the organization ID in the condition element. When you add and remove accounts, policies that include the aws:PrincipalOrgID key automatically include the correct accounts and don't require manual updating.

For example, the following Amazon S3 bucket policy allows members of any account in the o-xxxxxxxxxxx organization to add an object into the policy-ninja-dev bucket.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": { "Sid": "AllowPutObject", "Effect": "Allow", "Principal": "*", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::policy-ninja-dev/*", "Condition": {"StringEquals": {"aws:PrincipalOrgID":"o-xxxxxxxxxxx"} } } }
Note

This global condition also applies to the management account of an AWS organization. This policy prevents all principals outside of the specified organization from accessing the Amazon S3 bucket. This includes any AWS services that interact with your internal resources, such as AWS CloudTrail sending log data to your Amazon S3 buckets. To learn how you can safely grant access for AWS services, see aws:PrincipalIsAWSService.

For more information about AWS Organizations, see What Is AWS Organizations? in the AWS Organizations User Guide.

aws:PrincipalTag/tag-key

Use this key to compare the tag attached to the principal making the request with the tag that you specify in the policy. If the principal has more than one tag attached, the request context includes one aws:PrincipalTag key for each attached tag key.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context if the principal is using an IAM user with attached tags. It is included for a principal using an IAM role with attached tags or session tags. Anonymous requests do not include this key.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can add custom attributes to a user or role in the form of a key-value pair. For more information about IAM tags, see Tagging IAM resources. You can use aws:PrincipalTag to control access for AWS principals.

This example shows how you might create an identity-based policy that allows users with the department=hr tag to manage IAM users, groups, or roles. To use this policy, replace the italicized placeholder text in the example policy with your own information. Then, follow the directions in create a policy or edit a policy.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "iam:*", "Resource": "*", "Condition": { "StringEquals": { "aws:PrincipalTag/department": "hr" } } } ] }

aws:PrincipalIsAWSService

Use this key to check whether the call to your resource is being made directly by an AWS service principal. For example, AWS CloudTrail uses the service principal cloudtrail.amazonaws.com to write logs to your Amazon S3 bucket. The request context key is set to true when a service uses a service principal to perform a direct action on your resources. The context key is set to false if the service uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make a request on the principal's behalf. It is also set to false if the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf.

  • Availability – This key is present in the request context for all signed API requests that use AWS credentials. Anonymous requests do not include this key.

  • Data typeBoolean

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this condition key to limit access to your trusted identities and expected network locations while safely granting access to AWS services.

In the following Amazon S3 bucket policy example, access to the bucket is restricted unless the request originates from vpc-111bbb22 or is from a service principal, such as CloudTrail.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "Expected-network+service-principal", "Effect": "Deny", "Principal": "*", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET1/AWSLogs/AccountNumber/*", "Condition": { "StringNotEqualsIfExists": { "aws:SourceVpc": "vpc-111bbb22" }, "BoolIfExists": { "aws:PrincipalIsAWSService": "false" } } } ] }

In the following video, learn more about how you might use the aws:PrincipalIsAWSService condition key in a policy.

aws:PrincipalServiceName

Use this key to compare the service principal name in the policy with the service principal that is making requests to your resources. You can use this key to check whether this call is made by a specific service principal. When a service principal makes a direct request to your resource, the aws:PrincipalServiceName key contains the name of the service principal. For example, the AWS CloudTrail service principal name is cloudtrail.amazonaws.com.

  • Availability – This key is present in the request when the call is made by an AWS service principal. This key is not present in any other situation, including the following:

    • If the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf.

    • If the service uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make a request on the principal's behalf.

    • If the call is made directly by an IAM principal.

    • If the call is made by an anonymous requester.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this condition key to limit access to your trusted identities and expected network locations while safely granting access to an AWS service.

In the following Amazon S3 bucket policy example, access to the bucket is restricted unless the request originates from vpc-111bbb22 or is from a service principal, such as CloudTrail.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "expected-network+service-principal", "Effect": "Deny", "Principal": "*", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET1/AWSLogs/AccountNumber/*", "Condition": { "StringNotEqualsIfExists": { "aws:SourceVpc": "vpc-111bbb22", "aws:PrincipalServiceName": "cloudtrail.amazonaws.com" } } } ] }

aws:PrincipalServiceNamesList

This key provides a list of all service principal names that belong to the service. This is an advanced condition key. You can use it to restrict the service from accessing your resource from a specific Region only. Some services may create Regional service principals to indicate a particular instance of the service within a specific Region. You can limit access to a resource to a particular instance of the service. When a service principal makes a direct request to your resource, the aws:PrincipalServiceNamesList contains an unordered list of all service principal names associated with the Regional instance of the service.

  • Availability – This key is present in the request when the call is made by an AWS service principal. This key is not present in any other situation, including the following:

    • If the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf.

    • If the service uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make a request on the principal's behalf.

    • If the call is made directly by an IAM principal.

    • If the call is made by an anonymous requester.

  • Data typeString (list)

  • Value type – Multivalued

aws:PrincipalServiceNamesList is a multivalued condition key. Multivalued keys can have multiple values in the request context. You must use the ForAnyValue or ForAllValues set operators with string condition operators for this key. For more information about multivalued condition keys, see Multivalued context keys.

aws:PrincipalType

Use this key to compare the type of principal making the request with the principal type that you specify in the policy. For more information, see Specifying a principal. For specific examples of principal key values, see Principal key values.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context for all requests, including anonymous requests.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:userid

Use this key to compare the requester's principal identifier with the ID that you specify in the policy. For IAM users, the request context value is the user ID. For IAM roles, this value format can vary. For details about how the information appears for different principals, see Specifying a principal. For specific examples of principal key values, see Principal key values.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context for all requests, including anonymous requests.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:username

Use this key to compare the requester's user name with the user name that you specify in the policy. For details about how the information appears for different principals, see Specifying a principal. For specific examples of principal key values, see Principal key values.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context for IAM users. Anonymous requests and requests that are made using the AWS account root user or IAM roles do not include this key. Requests made using IAM Identity Center credentials do not include this key in the context.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

Properties of a role session

Use the following condition keys to compare properties of the role session at the time the session was generated. These condition keys are only available when a request is made by a principal with role session or federated user credentials. The values for these condition keys are embedded in the role’s session token.

A role is a type of principal. You can also use the condition keys from the Properties of the principal section to evaluate the properties of a role when a role is making a request.

aws:FederatedProvider

Use this key to compare the principal's issuing identity provider (IdP) with the IdP that you specify in the policy. This means that an IAM role was assumed using the AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity AWS STS operation. When the resulting role session's temporary credentials are used to make a request, the request context identifies the IdP that authenticated the original federated identity.

  • Availability – This key is present when the principal is a role session principal and that session was issued when a role was assumed with AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

For example, if the user was authenticated through Amazon Cognito, the request context includes the value cognito-identity.amazonaws.com. Similarly, if the user was authenticated through Login with Amazon, the request context includes the value www.amazon.com.

You can use any single-valued condition key as a variable. The following example resource-based policy uses the aws:FederatedProvider key as a policy variable in the ARN of a resource. This policy allows any principal who authenticated using an IdP to get objects out of an Amazon S3 bucket with a path that's specific to the issuing identity provider.

aws:TokenIssueTime

Use this key to compare the date and time that temporary security credentials were issued with the date and time that you specify in the policy.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the principal uses temporary credentials to make the request. The key is not present in AWS CLI, AWS API, or AWS SDK requests that are made using access keys.

  • Data typeDate

  • Value type – Single-valued

To learn which services support using temporary credentials, see AWS services that work with IAM.

aws:MultiFactorAuthAge

Use this key to compare the number of seconds since the requesting principal was authorized using MFA with the number that you specify in the policy. For more information about MFA, see Using multi-factor authentication (MFA) in AWS.

Important

This condition key is not present for federated identities or requests made using access keys to sign AWS CLI, AWS API, or AWS SDK requests. To learn more about adding MFA protection to API operations with temporary security credentials, see Configuring MFA-protected API access.

To check whether MFA is used to validate IAM federated identities, you can pass the authentication method from your identity provider to AWS as a session tag. For details, see Passing session tags in AWS STS. To enforce MFA for IAM Identity Center identities, you can enable attributes for access control to pass a SAML assertion claim with the authentication method from your identity provider to IAM Identity Center.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the principal uses temporary security credentials to make the request. Policies with MFA conditions can be attached to:

    • An IAM user or group

    • A resource such as an Amazon S3 bucket, Amazon SQS queue, or Amazon SNS topic

    • The trust policy of an IAM role that can be assumed by a user

  • Data typeNumeric

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent

Use this key to check whether multi-factor authentication (MFA) was used to validate the temporary security credentials that made the request.

Important

This condition key is not present for federated identities or requests made using access keys to sign AWS CLI, AWS API, or AWS SDK requests. To learn more about adding MFA protection to API operations with temporary security credentials, see Configuring MFA-protected API access.

To check whether MFA is used to validate IAM federated identities, you can pass the authentication method from your identity provider to AWS as a session tag. For details, see Passing session tags in AWS STS. To enforce MFA for IAM Identity Center identities, you can enable attributes for access control to pass a SAML assertion claim with the authentication method from your identity provider to IAM Identity Center.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the principal uses temporary credentials to make the request. Policies with MFA conditions can be attached to:

    • An IAM user or group

    • A resource such as an Amazon S3 bucket, Amazon SQS queue, or Amazon SNS topic

    • The trust policy of an IAM role that can be assumed by a user

  • Data typeBoolean

  • Value type – Single-valued

Temporary credentials are used to authenticate IAM roles and IAM users with temporary tokens from AssumeRole or GetSessionToken, and users of the AWS Management Console.

IAM user access keys are long-term credentials, but in some cases, AWS creates temporary credentials on behalf of IAM users to perform operations. In these cases, the aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent key is present in the request and set to a value of false. There are two common cases where this can happen:

  • IAM users in the AWS Management Console unknowingly use temporary credentials. Users sign into the console using their user name and password, which are long-term credentials. However, in the background, the console generates temporary credentials on behalf of the user.

  • If an IAM user makes a call to an AWS service, the service re-uses the user's credentials to make another request to a different service. For example, when calling Athena to access an Amazon S3 bucket, or when using AWS CloudFormation to create an Amazon EC2 instance. For the subsequent request, AWS uses temporary credentials.

To learn which services support using temporary credentials, see AWS services that work with IAM.

The aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent key is not present when an API or CLI command is called with long-term credentials, such as user access key pairs. Therefore we recommend that when you check for this key that you use the ...IfExists versions of the condition operators.

It is important to understand that the following Condition element is not a reliable way to check whether a request is authenticated using MFA.

##### WARNING: NOT RECOMMENDED ##### "Effect" : "Deny", "Condition" : { "Bool" : { "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent" : "false" } }

This combination of the Deny effect, Bool element, and false value denies requests that can be authenticated using MFA, but were not. This applies only to temporary credentials that support using MFA. This statement does not deny access to requests that are made using long-term credentials, or to requests that are authenticated using MFA. Use this example with caution because its logic is complicated and it does not test whether MFA-authentication was actually used.

Also do not use the combination of the Deny effect, Null element, and true because it behaves the same way and the logic is even more complicated.

Recommended Combination

We recommend that you use the BoolIfExists operator to check whether a request is authenticated using MFA.

"Effect" : "Deny", "Condition" : { "BoolIfExists" : { "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent" : "false" } }

This combination of Deny, BoolIfExists, and false denies requests that are not authenticated using MFA. Specifically, it denies requests from temporary credentials that do not include MFA. It also denies requests that are made using long-term credentials, such as AWS CLI or AWS API operations made using access keys. The *IfExists operator checks for the presence of the aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent key and whether or not it could be present, as indicated by its existence. Use this when you want to deny any request that is not authenticated using MFA. This is more secure, but can break any code or scripts that use access keys to access the AWS CLI or AWS API.

Alternative Combinations

You can also use the BoolIfExists operator to allow MFA-authenticated requests and AWS CLI or AWS API requests that are made using long-term credentials.

"Effect" : "Allow", "Condition" : { "BoolIfExists" : { "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent" : "true" } }

This condition matches either if the key exists and is present or if the key does not exist. This combination of Allow, BoolIfExists, and true allows requests that are authenticated using MFA, or requests that cannot be authenticated using MFA. This means that AWS CLI, AWS API, and AWS SDK operations are allowed when the requester uses their long-term access keys. This combination does not allow requests from temporary credentials that could, but do not include MFA.

When you create a policy using the IAM console visual editor and choose MFA required, this combination is applied. This setting requires MFA for console access, but allows programmatic access with no MFA.

Alternatively, you can use the Bool operator to allow programmatic and console requests only when authenticated using MFA.

"Effect" : "Allow", "Condition" : { "Bool" : { "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent" : "true" } }

This combination of the Allow, Bool, and true allows only MFA-authenticated requests. This applies only to temporary credentials that support using MFA. This statement does not allow access to requests that were made using long-term access keys, or to requests made using temporary credentials without MFA.

Do not use a policy construct similar to the following to check whether the MFA key is present:

##### WARNING: USE WITH CAUTION ##### "Effect" : "Allow", "Condition" : { "Null" : { "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent" : "false" } }

This combination of the Allow effect, Null element, and false value allows only requests that can be authenticated using MFA, regardless of whether the request is actually authenticated. This allows all requests that are made using temporary credentials, and denies access for long-term credentials. Use this example with caution because it does not test whether MFA-authentication was actually used.

aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc

This key identifies the VPC to which Amazon EC2 IAM role credentials were delivered to. You can use this key in a policy with the aws:SourceVPC global key to check if a call is made from a VPC (aws:SourceVPC) that matches the VPC where a credential was delivered to (aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc).

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context whenever the requester is signing requests with an Amazon EC2 role credential. It can be used in IAM policies, service control policies, VPC endpoint policies, and resource policies.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

This key can be used with VPC identifier values, but is most useful when used as a variable combined with the aws:SourceVpc context key. The aws:SourceVpc context key is included in the request context only if the requester uses a VPC endpoint to make the request. Using aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc with aws:SourceVpc allows you to use aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc more broadly since it compares values that typically change together.

Note

This condition key is not available in EC2-Classic.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "RequireSameVPC", "Effect": "Deny", "Action": "*", "Resource": "*", "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:SourceVpc": "${aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc}" }, "Null": { "ec2:SourceInstanceARN": "false" }, "BoolIfExists": { "aws:ViaAWSService": "false" } } } ] }

In the example above, access is denied if the aws:SourceVpc value isn’t equal to the aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc value. The policy statement is limited to only roles used as Amazon EC2 instance roles by testing for the existence of the ec2:SourceInstanceARN condition key.

The policy uses aws:ViaAWSService to allow AWS to authorize requests when requests are made on behalf of your Amazon EC2 instance roles. For example, when you make a request from an Amazon EC2 instance to an encrypted Amazon S3 bucket, Amazon S3 makes a call to AWS KMS on your behalf. Some of the keys are not present when the request is made to AWS KMS.

aws:Ec2InstanceSourcePrivateIPv4

This key identifies the private IPv4 address of the primary elastic network interface to which Amazon EC2 IAM role credentials were delivered. You must use this condition key with its companion key aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc to ensure that you have a globally unique combination of VPC ID and source private IP. Use this key with aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc to ensure that a request was made from the same private IP address that the credentials were delivered to.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context whenever the requester is signing requests with an Amazon EC2 role credential. It can be used in IAM policies, service control policies, VPC endpoint policies, and resource policies.

  • Data typeIP address

  • Value type – Single-valued

Important

This key should not be used alone in an Allow statement. Private IP addresses are by definition not globally unique. You should use the aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc key every time you use the aws:Ec2InstanceSourcePrivateIPv4 key to specify the VPC your Amazon EC2 instance credentials can be used from.

Note

This condition key is not available in EC2-Classic.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Effect": "Deny", "Action": "*", "Resource": "*", "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:Ec2InstanceSourceVpc": "${aws:SourceVpc}" }, "Null": { "ec2:SourceInstanceARN": "false" }, "BoolIfExists": { "aws:ViaAWSService": "false" } } }, { "Effect": "Deny", "Action": "*", "Resource": "*", "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:Ec2InstanceSourcePrivateIPv4": "${aws:VpcSourceIp}" }, "Null": { "ec2:SourceInstanceARN": "false" }, "BoolIfExists": { "aws:ViaAWSService": "false" } } } ] }

aws:SourceIdentity

Use this key to compare the source identity that was set by the principal with the source identity that you specify in the policy.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context after a source identity has been set when a role is assumed using any AWS STS assume-role CLI command, or AWS STS AssumeRole API operation.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this key in a policy to allow actions in AWS by principals that have set a source identity when assuming a role. Activity for the role's specified source identity appears in AWS CloudTrail. This makes it easier for administrators to determine who or what performed actions with a role in AWS.

Unlike sts:RoleSessionName, after the source identity is set, the value cannot be changed. It is present in the request context for all actions taken by the role. The value persists into subsequent role sessions when you use the session credentials to assume another role. Assuming one role from another is called role chaining.

The sts:SourceIdentity key is present in the request when the principal initially sets a source identity while assuming a role using any AWS STS assume-role CLI command, or AWS STS AssumeRole API operation. The aws:SourceIdentity key is present in the request for any actions that are taken with a role session that has a source identity set.

The following role trust policy for CriticalRole in account 111122223333 contains a condition for aws:SourceIdentity that prevents a principal without a source identity that is set to Saanvi or Diego from assuming the role.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "AssumeRoleIfSourceIdentity", "Effect": "Allow", "Principal": {"AWS": "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/CriticalRole"}, "Action": [ "sts:AssumeRole", "sts:SetSourceIdentity" ], "Condition": { "StringLike": { "aws:SourceIdentity": ["Saanvi","Diego"] } } } ] }

To learn more about using source identity information, see Monitor and control actions taken with assumed roles.

ec2:RoleDelivery

Use this key to compare the version of the instance metadata service in the signed request with the IAM role credentials for Amazon EC2. The instance metadata service distinguishes between IMDSv1 and IMDSv2 requests based on whether, for any given request, either the PUT or GET headers, which are unique to IMDSv2, are present in that request.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context whenever the role session is created by an Amazon EC2 instance.

  • Data typeNumeric

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example values – 1.0, 2.0

You can configure the Instance Metadata Service (IMDS) on each instance so that local code or users must use IMDSv2. When you specify that IMDSv2 must be used, IMDSv1 no longer works.

  • Instance Metadata Service Version 1 (IMDSv1) – A request/response method

  • Instance Metadata Service Version 2 (IMDSv2) – a session-oriented method

For information about how to configure your instance to use IMDSv2, see Configure the instance metadata options.

In the following example, access is denied if the ec2:RoleDelivery value in the request context is 1.0 (IMDSv1). This policy statement can be applied generally because, if the request is not signed by Amazon EC2 role credentials, it has no effect.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "RequireAllEc2RolesToUseV2", "Effect": "Deny", "Action": "*", "Resource": "*", "Condition": { "NumericLessThan": { "ec2:RoleDelivery": "2.0" } } } ] }

For more information, see Example policies for working with instance metadata.

ec2:SourceInstanceArn

Use this key to compare the ARN of the instance from which the role’s session was generated.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context whenever the role session is created by an Amazon EC2 instance.

  • Data typeARN

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example value – arn:aws:ec2:us-west-2:111111111111:instance/instance-id

For policy examples, see Allow a specific instance to view resources in other AWS services.

glue:RoleAssumedBy

The AWS Glue service sets this condition key for each AWS API request where AWS Glue makes a request using a service role on the customer's behalf (not by a job or developer endpoint, but directly by the AWS Glue service). Use this key to verify whether a call to an AWS resource came from the AWS Glue service.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context when AWS Glue makes a request using a service role on the customer's behalf.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example value – This key is always set to glue.amazonaws.com.

The following example adds a condition to allow the AWS Glue service to get an object from an Amazon S3 bucket.

{ "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "s3:GetObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::confidential-bucket/*", "Condition": { "StringEquals": { "glue:RoleAssumedBy": "glue.amazonaws.com" } } }

glue:CredentialIssuingService

The AWS Glue service sets this key for each AWS API request using a service role that comes from a job or developer endpoint. Use this key to verify whether a call to an AWS resource came from an AWS Glue job or developer endpoint.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context when AWS Glue makes a request that comes from a job or developer endpoint.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example value – This key is always set to glue.amazonaws.com.

The following example adds a condition that is attached to an IAM role that is used by an AWS Glue job. This ensures certain actions are allowed/denied based on whether the role session is used for an AWS Glue job runtime environment.

{ "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "s3:GetObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::confidential-bucket/*", "Condition": { "StringEquals": { "glue:CredentialIssuingService": "glue.amazonaws.com" } } }

lambda:SourceFunctionArn

Use this key to identify the Lambda function ARN that IAM role credentials were delivered to. The Lambda service sets this key for each AWS API request that comes from your function's execution environment. Use this key to verify whether a call to an AWS resource came from a specific Lambda function’s code. Lambda also sets this key for some requests that come from outside the execution environment, such as writing logs to CloudWatch and sending traces to X-Ray.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context whenever Lambda function code is invoked.

  • Data typeARN

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example value – arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456789012:function:TestFunction

The following example allows one specific Lambda function to have s3:PutObject access the specified bucket.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "ExampleSourceFunctionArn", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET/*", "Condition": { "ArnEquals": { "lambda:SourceFunctionArn": "arn:aws:lambda:us-east-1:123456789012:function:source_lambda" } } } ] }

For more information, see Working with Lambda execution environment credentials in the AWS Lambda Developer Guide.

ssm:SourceInstanceArn

Use this key to identify the AWS Systems Manager managed instance ARN that IAM role credentials were delivered to. This condition key is not present when the request comes from a managed instance with an IAM role associated with an Amazon EC2 instance profile.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context whenever role credentials are delivered to an AWS Systems Manager managed instance.

  • Data typeARN

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example value – arn:aws:ec2:us-west-2:111111111111:instance/instance-id

identitystore:UserId

Use this key to compare IAM Identity Center workforce identity in the signed request with the identity specified in the policy.

  • Availability – This key is included when the caller of the request is a user in IAM Identity Center.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

  • Example value – 94482488-3041-7026-18f3-be45837cd0e4

You can find the UserId of a user in IAM Identity Center by making a request to the GetUserId API using the AWS CLI, AWS API, or AWS SDK.

Properties of the network

Use the following condition keys to compare details about the network that the request originated from or passed through with the network properties that you specify in the policy.

aws:SourceIp

Use this key to compare the requester's IP address with the IP address that you specify in the policy. The aws:SourceIp condition key can only be used for public IP address ranges.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context, except when the requester uses a VPC endpoint to make the request.

  • Data typeIP address

  • Value type – Single-valued

The aws:SourceIp condition key can be used in a policy to allow principals to make requests only from within a specified IP range.

Note

aws:SourceIp supports both IPv4 and IPv6 address or range of IP addresses. For a list of AWS services that support IPv6, see AWS services that support IPv6 in the Amazon VPC User Guide.

For example, you can attach the following identity-based policy to an IAM role. This policy allows the user to put objects into the DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET3 Amazon S3 bucket if they make the call from the specified IPv4 address range. This policy also allows an AWS service that uses Forward access sessions to perform this operation on your behalf.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "PrincipalPutObjectIfIpAddress", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET3/*", "Condition": { "IpAddress": { "aws:SourceIp": "203.0.113.0/24" } } } ] }

If you need to restrict access from networks that support both IPv4 and IPv6 addressing, you can include the IPv4 and IPv6 address or ranges of IP addresses in the IAM policy condition. The following identity-based policy will allow the user to put objects into the DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET3 Amazon S3 bucket if the user makes the call from either specified IPv4 or IPv6 address ranges. Before you include IPv6 address ranges in your IAM policy, verify that the AWS service you are working with supports IPv6. For a list of AWS services that support IPv6, see AWS services that support IPv6 in the Amazon VPC User Guide.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "PrincipalPutObjectIfIpAddress", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET3/*", "Condition": { "IpAddress": { "aws:SourceIp": [ "203.0.113.0/24", "2001:DB8:1234:5678::/64" ] } } } ] }

If the request comes from a host that uses an Amazon VPC endpoint, then the aws:SourceIp key is not available. You should instead use a VPC-specific key such as aws:VpcSourceIp. For more information about using VPC endpoints, see Identity and access management for VPC endpoints and VPC endpoint services in the AWS PrivateLink Guide.

aws:SourceVpc

Use this key to check whether the request travels through the VPC that the VPC endpoint is attached to. In a policy, you can use this key to allow access to only a specific VPC. For more information, see Restricting Access to a Specific VPC in the Amazon Simple Storage Service User Guide.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the requester uses a VPC endpoint to make the request.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:SourceVpce

Use this key to compare the VPC endpoint identifier of the request with the endpoint ID that you specify in the policy. In a policy, you can use this key to restrict access to a specific VPC endpoint. For more information, see Restricting Access to a Specific VPC Endpoint in the Amazon Simple Storage Service User Guide.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the requester uses a VPC endpoint to make the request.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:VpcSourceIp

Use this key to compare the IP address from which a request was made with the IP address that you specify in the policy. In a policy, the key matches only if the request originates from the specified IP address and it goes through a VPC endpoint.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the request is made using a VPC endpoint.

  • Data typeIP address

  • Value type – Single-valued

For more information, see Controlling Access to Services with VPC Endpoints in the Amazon VPC User Guide.

Note

aws:VpcSourceIp supports both IPv4 and IPv6 address or range of IP addresses. For a list of AWS services that support IPv6, see AWS services that support IPv6 in the Amazon VPC User Guide.

Properties of the resource

Use the following condition keys to compare details about the resource that is the target of the request with the resource properties that you specify in the policy.

aws:ResourceAccount

Use this key to compare the requested resource owner's AWS account ID with the resource account in the policy. You can then allow or deny access to that resource based on the account that owns the resource.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context for most service actions. The following actions don't support this key:

    • AWS Audit Manager

      • auditmanager:UpdateAssessmentFrameworkShare

    • Amazon Detective

      • detective:AcceptInvitation

    • Amazon Elastic Block Store – All actions

    • Amazon EC2

      • ec2:AcceptTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:AcceptVpcEndpointConnections

      • ec2:AcceptVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:CopyImage

      • ec2:CopySnapshot

      • ec2:CreateTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:CreateVolume

      • ec2:CreateVpcEndpoint

      • ec2:CreateVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:DeleteTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:DeleteVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:RejectTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:RejectVpcEndpointConnections

      • ec2:RejectVpcPeeringConnection

    • Amazon EventBridge

      • events:PutEvents – EventBridge PutEvents calls on an event bus in another account, if that event bus was configured as a cross-account EventBridge target before March 2, 2023. For more information, see Grant permissions to allow events from other AWS accounts in the Amazon EventBridge User Guide.

    • Amazon GuardDuty

      • guardduty:AcceptAdministratorInvitation

    • Amazon Macie

      • macie2:AcceptInvitation

    • Amazon OpenSearch Service

      • opensearch:AcceptInboundConnection

      • opensearch:CreateOutboundConnection

    • Amazon Route 53

      • route53:AssociateVpcWithHostedZone

      • route53:CreateVPCAssociationAuthorization

      • route53:DeleteVPCAssociationAuthorization

      • route53:DisassociateVPCFromHostedZone

      • route53:ListHostedZonesByVPC

    • AWS Security Hub

      • securityhub:AcceptAdministratorInvitation

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

Note

For additional considerations for the above unsupported actions, see the Data Perimeter Policy Examples repository.

This key is equal to the AWS account ID for the account with the resources evaluated in the request.

For most resources in your account, the ARN contains the owner account ID for that resource. For certain resources, such as Amazon S3 buckets, the resource ARN does not include the account ID. The following two examples show the difference between a resource with an account ID in the ARN, and an Amazon S3 ARN without an account ID:

  • arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/AWSExampleRole – IAM role created and owned within the account 123456789012.

  • arn:aws:s3:::DOC-EXAMPLE-BUCKET2 – Amazon S3 bucket created and owned within the account 111122223333, not displayed in the ARN.

Use the AWS console, or API, or CLI, to find all of your resources and corresponding ARNs.

You write a policy that denies permissions to resources based on the resource owner's account ID. For example, the following identity-based policy denies access to the specified resource if the resource does not belong to the specified account.

To use this policy, replace the italicized placeholder text with your account information.

Important

This policy does not allow any actions. Instead, it uses the Deny effect which explicitly denies access to all of the resources listed in the statement that do not belong to the listed account. Use this policy in combination with other policies that allow access to specific resources.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "DenyInteractionWithResourcesNotInSpecificAccount", "Action": "service:*", "Effect": "Deny", "Resource": [ "arn:aws:service:region:account:*" ], "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:ResourceAccount": [ "account" ] } } } ] }

This policy denies access to all resources for a specific AWS service unless the specified AWS account owns the resource.

Note

Some AWS services require access to AWS owned resources that are hosted in another AWS account. Using aws:ResourceAccount in your identity-based policies might impact your identity's ability to access these resources.

Certain AWS services, such as AWS Data Exchange, rely on access to resources outside of your AWS accounts for normal operations. If you use the element aws:ResourceAccount in your policies, include additional statements to create exemptions for those services. The example policy AWS: Deny access to Amazon S3 resources outside your account except AWS Data Exchange demonstrates how to deny access based on the resource account while defining exceptions for service-owned resources.

Use this policy example as a template for creating your own custom policies. Refer to your service documentation for more information.

aws:ResourceOrgPaths

Use this key to compare the AWS Organizations path for the accessed resource to the path in the policy. In a policy, this condition key ensures that the resource belongs to an account member within the specified organization root or organizational units (OUs) in AWS Organizations. An AWS Organizations path is a text representation of the structure of an Organizations entity. For more information about using and understanding paths, see Understand the AWS Organizations entity path

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the account that owns the resource is a member of an organization. This global condition key does not support the following actions:

    • AWS Audit Manager

      • auditmanager:UpdateAssessmentFrameworkShare

    • Amazon Detective

      • detective:AcceptInvitation

    • Amazon Elastic Block Store – All actions

    • Amazon EC2

      • ec2:AcceptTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:AcceptVpcEndpointConnections

      • ec2:AcceptVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:CopyImage

      • ec2:CopySnapshot

      • ec2:CreateTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:CreateVolume

      • ec2:CreateVpcEndpoint

      • ec2:CreateVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:DeleteTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:DeleteVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:RejectTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:RejectVpcEndpointConnections

      • ec2:RejectVpcPeeringConnection

    • Amazon EventBridge

      • events:PutEvents – EventBridge PutEvents calls on an event bus in another account, if that event bus was configured as a cross-account EventBridge target before March 2, 2023. For more information, see Grant permissions to allow events from other AWS accounts in the Amazon EventBridge User Guide.

    • Amazon GuardDuty

      • guardduty:AcceptAdministratorInvitation

    • Amazon Macie

      • macie2:AcceptInvitation

    • Amazon OpenSearch Service

      • opensearch:AcceptInboundConnection

      • opensearch:CreateOutboundConnection

    • Amazon Route 53

      • route53:AssociateVpcWithHostedZone

      • route53:CreateVPCAssociationAuthorization

      • route53:DeleteVPCAssociationAuthorization

      • route53:DisassociateVPCFromHostedZone

      • route53:ListHostedZonesByVPC

    • AWS Security Hub

      • securityhub:AcceptAdministratorInvitation

  • Data typeString (list)

  • Value type – Multivalued

Note

For additional considerations for the above unsupported actions, see the Data Perimeter Policy Examples repository.

aws:ResourceOrgPaths is a multivalued condition key. Multivalued keys can have multiple values in the request context. You must use the ForAnyValue or ForAllValues set operators with string condition operators for this key. For more information about multivalued condition keys, see Multivalued context keys.

For example, the following condition returns True for resources that belong to the organization o-a1b2c3d4e5. When you include a wildcard, you must use the StringLike condition operator.

"Condition": { "ForAnyValue:StringLike": { "aws:ResourceOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/*"] } }

The following condition returns True for resources with the OU ID ou-ab12-11111111. It will match resources owned by accounts attached to the OU ou-ab12-11111111 or any of the child OUs.

"Condition": { "ForAnyValue:StringLike" : { "aws:ResourceOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-11111111/*"] }}

The following condition returns True for resources owned by accounts attached directly to the OU ID ou-ab12-22222222, but not the child OUs. The following example uses the StringEquals condition operator to specify the exact match requirement for the OU ID and not a wildcard match.

"Condition": { "ForAnyValue:StringEquals" : { "aws:ResourceOrgPaths":["o-a1b2c3d4e5/r-ab12/ou-ab12-11111111/ou-ab12-22222222/"] }}
Note

Some AWS services require access to AWS owned resources that are hosted in another AWS account. Using aws:ResourceOrgPaths in your identity-based policies might impact your identity's ability to access these resources.

Certain AWS services, such as AWS Data Exchange, rely on access to resources outside of your AWS accounts for normal operations. If you use the aws:ResourceOrgPaths key in your policies, include additional statements to create exemptions for those services. The example policy AWS: Deny access to Amazon S3 resources outside your account except AWS Data Exchange demonstrates how to deny access based on the resource account while defining exceptions for service-owned resources. You can create a similar policy to restrict access to resources within an organizational unit (OU) using the aws:ResourceOrgPaths key, while accounting for service-owned resources.

Use this policy example as a template for creating your own custom policies. Refer to your service documentation for more information.

aws:ResourceOrgID

Use this key to compare the identifier of the organization in AWS Organizations to which the requested resource belongs with the identifier specified in the policy.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the account that owns the resource is a member of an organization. This global condition key does not support the following actions:

    • AWS Audit Manager

      • auditmanager:UpdateAssessmentFrameworkShare

    • Amazon Detective

      • detective:AcceptInvitation

    • Amazon Elastic Block Store – All actions

    • Amazon EC2

      • ec2:AcceptTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:AcceptVpcEndpointConnections

      • ec2:AcceptVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:CopyImage

      • ec2:CopySnapshot

      • ec2:CreateTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:CreateVolume

      • ec2:CreateVpcEndpoint

      • ec2:CreateVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:DeleteTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:DeleteVpcPeeringConnection

      • ec2:RejectTransitGatewayPeeringAttachment

      • ec2:RejectVpcEndpointConnections

      • ec2:RejectVpcPeeringConnection

    • Amazon EventBridge

      • events:PutEvents – EventBridge PutEvents calls on an event bus in another account, if that event bus was configured as a cross-account EventBridge target before March 2, 2023. For more information, see Grant permissions to allow events from other AWS accounts in the Amazon EventBridge User Guide.

    • Amazon GuardDuty

      • guardduty:AcceptAdministratorInvitation

    • Amazon Macie

      • macie2:AcceptInvitation

    • Amazon OpenSearch Service

      • opensearch:AcceptInboundConnection

      • opensearch:CreateOutboundConnection

    • Amazon Route 53

      • route53:AssociateVpcWithHostedZone

      • route53:CreateVPCAssociationAuthorization

      • route53:DeleteVPCAssociationAuthorization

      • route53:DisassociateVPCFromHostedZone

      • route53:ListHostedZonesByVPC

    • AWS Security Hub

      • securityhub:AcceptAdministratorInvitation

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

Note

For additional considerations for the above unsupported actions, see the Data Perimeter Policy Examples repository.

This global key returns the resource organization ID for a given request. It allows you to create rules that apply to all resources in an organization that are specified in the Resource element of an identity-based policy. You can specify the organization ID in the condition element. When you add and remove accounts, policies that include the aws:ResourceOrgID key automatically include the correct accounts and you don't have to manually update it.

For example, the following policy prevents the principal from adding objects to the policy-genius-dev resource unless the Amazon S3 resource belongs to the same organization as the principal making the request.

Important

This policy does not allow any actions. Instead, it uses the Deny effect which explicitly denies access to all of the resources listed in the statement that do not belong to the listed account. Use this policy in combination with other policies that allow access to specific resources.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": { "Sid": "DenyPutObjectToS3ResourcesOutsideMyOrganization", "Effect": "Deny", "Action": "s3:PutObject", "Resource": "arn:partition:s3:::policy-genius-dev/*", "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:ResourceOrgID": "${aws:PrincipalOrgID}" } } } }
Note

Some AWS services require access to AWS owned resources that are hosted in another AWS account. Using aws:ResourceOrgID in your identity-based policies might impact your identity's ability to access these resources.

Certain AWS services, such as AWS Data Exchange, rely on access to resources outside of your AWS accounts for normal operations. If you use the aws:ResourceOrgID key in your policies, include additional statements to create exemptions for those services. The example policy AWS: Deny access to Amazon S3 resources outside your account except AWS Data Exchange demonstrates how to deny access based on the resource account while defining exceptions for service-owned resources. You can create a similar policy to restrict access to resources within your organization using the aws:ResourceOrgID key, while accounting for service-owned resources.

Use this policy example as a template for creating your own custom policies. Refer to your service documentation for more information.

In the following video, learn more about how you might use the aws:ResourceOrgID condition key in a policy.

aws:ResourceTag/tag-key

Use this key to compare the tag key-value pair that you specify in the policy with the key-value pair attached to the resource. For example, you could require that access to a resource is allowed only if the resource has the attached tag key "Dept" with the value "Marketing". For more information, see Controlling access to AWS resources.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context when the requested resource already has attached tags or in requests that create a resource with an attached tag. This key is returned only for resources that support authorization based on tags. There is one context key for each tag key-value pair.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

This context key is formatted "aws:ResourceTag/tag-key":"tag-value" where tag-key and tag-value are a tag key and value pair. Tag keys and values are not case-sensitive. This means that if you specify "aws:ResourceTag/TagKey1": "Value1" in the condition element of your policy, then the condition matches a resource tag key named either TagKey1 or tagkey1, but not both.

For examples of using the aws:ResourceTag key to control access to IAM resources, see Controlling access to AWS resources.

For examples of using the aws:ResourceTag key to control access to other AWS resources, see Controlling access to AWS resources using tags.

For a tutorial on using the aws:ResourceTag condition key for attribute based access control (ABAC), see IAM tutorial: Define permissions to access AWS resources based on tags.

Properties of the request

Use the following condition keys to compare details about the request itself and the contents of the request with the request properties that you specify in the policy.

aws:CalledVia

Use this key to compare the services in the policy with the services that made requests on behalf of the IAM principal (user or role). When a principal makes a request to an AWS service, that service might use the principal's credentials to make subsequent requests to other services. The aws:CalledVia key contains an ordered list of each service in the chain that made requests on the principal's behalf.

For example, you can use AWS CloudFormation to read and write from an Amazon DynamoDB table. DynamoDB then uses encryption supplied by AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS).

  • Availability – This key is present in the request when a service that supports aws:CalledVia uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make a request to another service. This key is not present if the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf. This key is also not present when the principal makes the call directly.

  • Data typeString (list)

  • Value type – Multivalued

To use the aws:CalledVia condition key in a policy, you must provide the service principals to allow or deny AWS service requests. AWS supports using the following service principals with aws:CalledVia.

Service principal
aoss.amazonaws.com
athena.amazonaws.com
backup.amazonaws.com
cloud9.amazonaws.com
cloudformation.amazonaws.com
databrew.amazonaws.com
dataexchange.amazonaws.com
dynamodb.amazonaws.com
imagebuilder.amazonaws.com
kms.amazonaws.com
mgn.amazonaws.com
nimble.amazonaws.com
omics.amazonaws.com
ram.amazonaws.com
robomaker.amazonaws.com
servicecatalog-appregistry.amazonaws.com
sqlworkbench.amazonaws.com
ssm-guiconnect.amazonaws.com

To allow or deny access when any service makes a request using the principal's credentials, use the aws:ViaAWSService condition key. That condition key supports AWS services.

The aws:CalledVia key is a multivalued key. However, you can't enforce order using this key in a condition. Using the example above, User 1 makes a request to AWS CloudFormation, which calls DynamoDB, which calls AWS KMS. These are three separate requests. The final call to AWS KMS is performed by User 1 via AWS CloudFormation and then DynamoDB.

Example using aws:CalledVia

In this case, the aws:CalledVia key in the request context includes cloudformation.amazonaws.com and dynamodb.amazonaws.com, in that order. If you care only that the call was made via DynamoDB somewhere in the chain of requests, you can use this condition key in your policy.

For example, the following policy allows managing the AWS KMS key named my-example-key, but only if DynamoDB is one of the requesting services. The ForAnyValue:StringEquals condition operator ensures that DynamoDB is one of the calling services. If the principal makes the call to AWS KMS directly, the condition returns false and the request is not allowed by this policy.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "KmsActionsIfCalledViaDynamodb", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "kms:Encrypt", "kms:Decrypt", "kms:ReEncrypt*", "kms:GenerateDataKey", "kms:DescribeKey" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:kms:region:111122223333:key/my-example-key", "Condition": { "ForAnyValue:StringEquals": { "aws:CalledVia": ["dynamodb.amazonaws.com"] } } } ] }

If you want to enforce which service makes the first or last call in the chain, you can use the aws:CalledViaFirst and aws:CalledViaLast keys. For example, the following policy allows managing the key named my-example-key in AWS KMS. These AWS KMS operations are allowed only if multiple requests were included in the chain. The first request must be made via AWS CloudFormation and the last via DynamoDB. If other services make requests in the middle of the chain, the operation is still allowed.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "KmsActionsIfCalledViaChain", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "kms:Encrypt", "kms:Decrypt", "kms:ReEncrypt*", "kms:GenerateDataKey", "kms:DescribeKey" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:kms:region:111122223333:key/my-example-key", "Condition": { "StringEquals": { "aws:CalledViaFirst": "cloudformation.amazonaws.com", "aws:CalledViaLast": "dynamodb.amazonaws.com" } } } ] }

The aws:CalledViaFirst and aws:CalledViaLast keys are present in the request when a service uses an IAM principal's credentials to call another service. They indicate the first and last services that made calls in the chain of requests. For example, assume that AWS CloudFormation calls another service named X Service, which calls DynamoDB, which then calls AWS KMS. The final call to AWS KMS is performed by User 1 via AWS CloudFormation, then X Service, and then DynamoDB. It was first called via AWS CloudFormation and last called via DynamoDB.

Example using aws:CalledViaFirst and aws:CalledViaLast

aws:CalledViaFirst

Use this key to compare the services in the policy with the first service that made a request on behalf of the IAM principal (user or role). For more information, see aws:CalledVia.

  • Availability – This key is present in the request when a service uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make at least one other request to a different service. This key is not present if the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf. This key is also not present when the principal makes the call directly.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:CalledViaLast

Use this key to compare the services in the policy with the last service that made a request on behalf of the IAM principal (user or role). For more information, see aws:CalledVia.

  • Availability – This key is present in the request when a service uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make at least one other request to a different service. This key is not present if the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf. This key is also not present when the principal makes the call directly.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:ViaAWSService

Use this key to check whether an AWS service makes a request to another service on your behalf.

The request context key returns true when a service uses the credentials of an IAM principal to make a request on behalf of the principal. The context key returns false if the service uses a service role or service-linked role to make a call on the principal's behalf. The request context key also returns false when the principal makes the call directly.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context.

  • Data typeBoolean

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this condition key to allow or deny access based on whether a request was made by a service.

aws:CurrentTime

Use this key to compare the date and time of the request with the date and time that you specify in the policy. To view an example policy that uses this condition key, see AWS: Allows access based on date and time.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context.

  • Data typeDate

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:EpochTime

Use this key to compare the date and time of the request in epoch or Unix time with the value that you specify in the policy. This key also accepts the number of seconds since January 1, 1970.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context.

  • Data typeDate, Numeric

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:referer

Use this key to compare who referred the request in the client browser with the referer that you specify in the policy. The aws:referer request context value is provided by the caller in an HTTP header. The Referer header is included in a web browser request when you select a link on a web page. The Referer header contains the URL of the web page where the link was selected.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only if the request to the AWS resource was invoked by linking from a web page URL in the browser. This key is not included for programmatic requests because it doesn't use a browser link to access the AWS resource.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

For example, you can access an Amazon S3 object directly using a URL or using direct API invocation. For more information, see Amazon S3 API operations directly using a web browser. When you access an Amazon S3 object from a URL that exists in a webpage, the URL of the source web page is in used in aws:referer. When you access an Amazon S3 object by typing the URL into your browser, aws:referer is not present. When you invoke the API directly, aws:referer is also not present. You can use the aws:referer condition key in a policy to allow requests made from a specific referer, such as a link on a web page in your company's domain.

Warning

This key should be used carefully. It is dangerous to include a publicly known referer header value. Unauthorized parties can use modified or custom browsers to provide any aws:referer value that they choose. As a result, aws:referer should not be used to prevent unauthorized parties from making direct AWS requests. It is offered only to allow customers to protect their digital content, such as content stored in Amazon S3, from being referenced on unauthorized third-party sites.

aws:RequestedRegion

Use this key to compare the AWS Region that was called in the request with the Region that you specify in the policy. You can use this global condition key to control which Regions can be requested. To view the AWS Regions for each service, see Service endpoints and quotas in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

Some global services, such as IAM, have a single endpoint. Because this endpoint is physically located in the US East (N. Virginia) Region, IAM calls are always made to the us-east-1 Region. For example, if you create a policy that denies access to all services if the requested Region is not us-west-2, then IAM calls always fail. To view an example of how to work around this, see NotAction with Deny.

Note

The aws:RequestedRegion condition key allows you to control which endpoint of a service is invoked but does not control the impact of the operation. Some services have cross-Region impacts.

For example, Amazon S3 has API operations that extend across regions.

  • You can invoke s3:PutBucketReplication in one Region (which is affected by the aws:RequestedRegion condition key), but other Regions are affected based on the replications configuration settings.

  • You can invoke s3:CreateBucket to create a bucket in another region, and use the s3:LocationConstraint condition key to control the applicable regions.

You can use this context key to limit access to AWS services within a given set of Regions. For example, the following policy allows a user to view all of the Amazon EC2 instances in the AWS Management Console. However it only allows them to make changes to instances in Ireland (eu-west-1), London (eu-west-2), or Paris (eu-west-3).

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Sid": "InstanceConsoleReadOnly", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "ec2:Describe*", "ec2:Export*", "ec2:Get*", "ec2:Search*" ], "Resource": "*" }, { "Sid": "InstanceWriteRegionRestricted", "Effect": "Allow", "Action": [ "ec2:Associate*", "ec2:Import*", "ec2:Modify*", "ec2:Monitor*", "ec2:Reset*", "ec2:Run*", "ec2:Start*", "ec2:Stop*", "ec2:Terminate*" ], "Resource": "*", "Condition": { "StringEquals": { "aws:RequestedRegion": [ "eu-west-1", "eu-west-2", "eu-west-3" ] } } } ] }

aws:RequestTag/tag-key

Use this key to compare the tag key-value pair that was passed in the request with the tag pair that you specify in the policy. For example, you could check whether the request includes the tag key "Dept" and that it has the value "Accounting". For more information, see Controlling access during AWS requests.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context when tag key-value pairs are passed in the request. When multiple tags are passed in the request, there is one context key for each tag key-value pair.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

This context key is formatted "aws:RequestTag/tag-key":"tag-value" where tag-key and tag-value are a tag key and value pair. Tag keys and values are not case-sensitive. This means that if you specify "aws:RequestTag/TagKey1": "Value1" in the condition element of your policy, then the condition matches a request tag key named either TagKey1 or tagkey1, but not both.

This example shows that while the key is single-valued, you can still use multiple key-value pairs in a request if the keys are different.

{ "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": { "Effect": "Allow", "Action": "ec2:CreateTags", "Resource": "arn:aws:ec2:::instance/*", "Condition": { "StringEquals": { "aws:RequestTag/environment": [ "preprod", "production" ], "aws:RequestTag/team": [ "engineering" ] } } } }

aws:TagKeys

Use this key to compare the tag keys in a request with the keys that you specify in the policy. We recommend that when you use policies to control access using tags, use the aws:TagKeys condition key to define what tag keys are allowed. For example policies and more information, see Controlling access based on tag keys.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context if the operation supports passing tags in the request.

  • Data typeString (list)

  • Value type – Multivalued

This context key is formatted "aws:TagKeys":"tag-key" where tag-key is a list of tag keys without values (for example, ["Dept","Cost-Center"]).

Because you can include multiple tag key-value pairs in a request, the request content could be a multivalued request. In this case, you must use the ForAllValues or ForAnyValue set operators. For more information, see Multivalued context keys.

Some services support tagging with resource operations, such as creating, modifying, or deleting a resource. To allow tagging and operations as a single call, you must create a policy that includes both the tagging action and the resource-modifying action. You can then use the aws:TagKeys condition key to enforce using specific tag keys in the request. For example, to limit tags when someone creates an Amazon EC2 snapshot, you must include the ec2:CreateSnapshot creation action and the ec2:CreateTags tagging action in the policy. To view a policy for this scenario that uses aws:TagKeys, see Creating a Snapshot with Tags in the Amazon EC2 User Guide for Linux Instances.

aws:SecureTransport

Use this key to check whether the request was sent using SSL. The request context returns true or false. In a policy, you can allow specific actions only if the request is sent using SSL.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context.

  • Data typeBoolean

  • Value type – Single-valued

aws:SourceArn

Use this key to compare the Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the resource making a service-to-service request with the ARN that you specify in the policy, but only when the request is made by an AWS service principal. When the source's ARN includes the account ID, it is not necessary to use aws:SourceAccount with aws:SourceArn.

This key does not work with the ARN of the principal making the request. Instead, use aws:PrincipalArn.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the call to your resource is being made directly by an AWS service principal on behalf of a resource for which the configuration triggered the service-to-service request. The calling service passes the ARN of the original resource to the called service.

    aws:SourceArn

    The following service integrations don't support this global condition key:

    Calling service (service principal) Called service (resource-based policy) Description
    logdelivery.elb.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    logdelivery.elasticloadbalancing.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    Note

    Not all service integrations with AWS Security Token Service (AWS STS) and AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) are supported. See the documentation of the calling service for more information. Usage of aws:SourceArn in KMS key policies for keys used by AWS services via KMS key grants may result in unexpected behavior.

  • Data type – ARN, String

    AWS recommends that you use ARN operators instead of string operators when comparing ARNs.

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this condition key to prevent an AWS service from being used as a confused deputy during transactions between services. Use this key only in resource-based policies where the Principal is an AWS service principal. Set the value of this condition key to the ARN of the resource in the request. For example, when an Amazon S3 bucket update triggers an Amazon SNS topic publish, the Amazon S3 service invokes the sns:Publish API operation. In the topic policy that allows the sns:Publish operation, set the value of the condition key to the ARN of the Amazon S3 bucket. For information about how and when this condition key is recommended, see the documentation for the AWS services you are using.

aws:SourceAccount

Use this key to compare the account ID of the resource making a service-to-service request with the account ID that you specify in the policy, but only when the request is made by an AWS service principal.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the call to your resource is being made directly by an AWS service principal on behalf of a resource for which the configuration triggered the service-to-service request. The calling service passes the account ID of the original resource to the called service.

    aws:SourceAccount

    The following service integrations don't support this global condition key:

    Calling service (service principal) Called service (resource-based policy) Description
    logdelivery.elb.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    logdelivery.elasticloadbalancing.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    Note

    Not all service integrations with AWS Security Token Service (AWS STS) and AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) are supported. See the documentation of the calling service for more information. Usage of aws:SourceAccount in KMS key policies for keys used by AWS services via KMS key grants may result in unexpected behavior.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this condition key to prevent an AWS service from being used as a confused deputy during transactions between services. Use this key only in resource-based policies where the Principal is an AWS service principal. Set the value of this condition key to the account ID of the resource in the request. For example, when an Amazon S3 bucket update triggers an Amazon SNS topic publish, the Amazon S3 service invokes the sns:Publish API operation. In the topic policy that allows the sns:Publish operation, set the value of the condition key to the account ID of the Amazon S3 bucket. For information about how and when this condition keys is recommended, see the documentation for the AWS services you are using.

aws:SourceOrgPaths

Use this key to compare the AWS Organizations path of the resource making a service-to-service request with the organizations path that you specify in the policy, but only when the request is made by an AWS service principal. An Organizations path is a text representation of the structure of an Organizations entity. For more information about using and understanding paths, see Understand the AWS Organizations entity path.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the call to your resource is being made directly by an AWS service principal on behalf of a resource owned by an account which is a member of an organization. The calling service passes the organization path of the original resource to the called service.

    aws:SourceOrgPaths

    The following service integrations don't support this global condition key:

    Calling service (service principal) Called service (resource-based policy) Description
    logdelivery.elb.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    logdelivery.elasticloadbalancing.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    All service principals Amazon Lex bot Allow AWS services to use Amazon Lex bot
    Note

    Not all service integrations with AWS Security Token Service (AWS STS) and AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) are supported. See the documentation of the calling service for more information. Usage of aws:SourceOrgPaths in KMS key policies for keys used by AWS services via KMS key grants may result in unexpected behavior.

  • Data typeString (list)

  • Value type – Multivalued

You can use this condition key to prevent an AWS service from being used as a confused deputy during transactions between services. Use this key only in resource-based policies where the Principal is an AWS service principal. Set the value of this condition key to the organization path of the resource in the request. For example, when an Amazon S3 bucket update triggers an Amazon SNS topic publish, the Amazon S3 service invokes the sns:Publish API operation. In the topic policy that allows the sns:Publish operation, set the value of the condition key to the organization path of the Amazon S3 bucket. For information about how and when this condition key is recommended, see the documentation for the AWS services you are using.

aws:SourceOrgPaths is a multivalued condition key. Multivalued keys can have multiple values in the request context. You must use the ForAnyValue or ForAllValues set operators with string condition operators for this key. For more information about multivalued condition keys, see Multivalued context keys.

aws:SourceOrgID

Use this key to compare the organization ID of the resource making a service-to-service request with the organization ID that you specify in the policy, but only when the request is made by an AWS service principal. When you add and remove accounts to an organization in AWS Organizations, policies that include the aws:SourceOrgID key automatically include the correct accounts and you don't have to manually update the policies.

  • Availability – This key is included in the request context only when the call to your resource is being made directly by an AWS service principal on behalf of a resource owned by an account which is a member of an organization. The calling service passes the organization ID of the original resource to the called service.

    aws:SourceOrgID

    The following service integrations don't support this global condition key:

    Calling service (service principal) Called service (resource-based policy) Description
    logdelivery.elb.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    logdelivery.elasticloadbalancing.amazonaws.com Amazon S3 bucket Enable Elastic Load Balancing access logging in Amazon S3 bucket
    All service principals Amazon Lex bot Allow AWS services to use Amazon Lex bot
    Note

    Not all service integrations with AWS Security Token Service (AWS STS) and AWS Key Management Service (AWS KMS) are supported. See the documentation of the calling service for more information. Usage of aws:SourceOrgID in KMS key policies for keys used by AWS services via KMS key grants may result in unexpected behavior.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

You can use this condition key to prevent an AWS service from being used as a confused deputy during transactions between services. Use this key only in resource-based policies where the Principal is an AWS service principal. Set the value of this condition key to the organization ID of the resource in the request. For example, when an Amazon S3 bucket update triggers an Amazon SNS topic publish, the Amazon S3 service invokes the sns:Publish API operation. In the topic policy that allows the sns:Publish operation, set the value of the condition key to the organization ID of the Amazon S3 bucket. For information about how and when this condition key is recommended, see the documentation for the AWS services that you are using.

aws:UserAgent

Use this key to compare the requester's client application with the application that you specify in the policy.

  • Availability – This key is always included in the request context.

  • Data typeString

  • Value type – Single-valued

Warning

This key should be used carefully. Since the aws:UserAgent value is provided by the caller in an HTTP header, unauthorized parties can use modified or custom browsers to provide any aws:UserAgent value that they choose. As a result, aws:UserAgent should not be used to prevent unauthorized parties from making direct AWS requests. You can use it to allow only specific client applications, and only after testing your policy.

Other cross-service condition keys

AWS STS supports SAML-based federation condition keys and cross-service condition keys for OIDC federation. These keys are available when a user who was federated using SAML performs AWS operations in other services.