AWS CodeDeploy
User Guide (API Version 2014-10-06)

A new console design is available for this service. Although the procedures in this guide were written for the older version of the console, you will find many of the concepts and basic procedures in this guide still apply.

AppSpec 'permissions' Section (EC2/On-Premises Deployments Only)

The 'permissions' section specifies how special permissions, if any, should be applied to the files and directories/folders in the 'files' section after they are copied to the instance. You can specify multiple object instructions. This section is optional. It applies to Amazon Linux, Ubuntu Server, and RHEL instances only.

Note

The 'permissions' section is used for EC2/On-Premises deployments only. It is not used for AWS Lambda deployments.

This section has the following structure:

permissions: - object: object-specification pattern: pattern-specification except: exception-specification owner: owner-account-name group: group-name mode: mode-specification acls: - acls-specification context: user: user-specification type: type-specification range: range-specification type: - object-type

The instructions are as follows:

  • object – Required. This is a set of file system objects (files or directories/folders) that the specified permissions are applied to after the file system objects are copied to the instance.

    Specify object with a string.

  • pattern – Optional. Specifies a pattern to apply permissions. If not specified or specified with the special characters "**", the permissions are applied to all matching files or directories, depending on the type.

    Specify pattern with a string with quotation marks ("").

  • except – Optional. Specifies any files or directories that are exceptions to pattern.

    Specify except with a comma-separated list of strings inside square brackets.

  • owner – Optional. The name of the owner of object. If not specified, all existing owners applied to the original file or directory/folder structure remain unchanged after the copy operation.

    Specify owner with a string.

  • group – Optional. The name of the group for object. If not specified, all existing groups applied to the original file or directory/folder structure remain unchanged after the copy operation.

    Specify group with a string.

  • mode – Optional. An integer specifying the octal mode for the permissions to be applied to object. For example, 644 represents read and write permissions for the owner, read-only permissions for the group, and read-only permissions for all other users. 4755 represents the setuid attribute is set, full control permissions for the owner, read and execute permissions for the group, and read and execute permissions for all other users. (For more examples, see the Linux chmod command documentation.) If mode is not specified, all existing modes applied to the original file or directory/folder structure remain unchanged after the copy operation.

    Specify mode with a string.

  • acls – Optional. A list of character strings representing one or more access control list (ACL) entries applied to object. For example, u:bob:rw represents read and write permissions for user bob. (For more examples, see ACL entry format examples in the Linux setfacl command documentation.) You can specify multiple ACL entries. If acls is not specified, any existing ACLs applied to the original file or directory/folder structure remain unchanged after the copy operation. These replace any existing ACLs.

    Specify an acls with a dash (-), followed by a space, and then a string (for example, - u:jane:rw). If you have more than one ACL, each is specified on a separate line.

    Note

    Setting unnamed users, unnamed groups, or other similar ACL entries causes the AppSpec file to fail. Use mode to specify these types of permissions instead.

  • context – Optional. For Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux)-enabled instances, a list of security-relevant context labels to apply to the copied objects. Labels are specified as keys containing user, type, and range. (For more information, see the SELinux documentation.) Each key is entered with a string. If not specified, any existing labels applied to the original file or directory/folder structure remain unchanged after the copy operation.

    • user – Optional. The SELinux user.

    • type – Optional. The SELinux type name.

    • range – Optional. The SELinux range specifier. This has no effect unless Multi-Level Security (MLS) and Multi-Category Security (MCS) are enabled on the machine. If not enabled, range defaults to s0.

    Specify context with a string. For example, user: unconfined_u. Each context is specified on a seperate line.

  • type – Optional. The types of objects to which to apply the specified permissions. type is a string that can be set to file or directory. If file is specified, the permissions are applied only to files that are immediately contained in object after the copy operation (and not to object itself). If directory is specified, the permissions are recursively applied to all directories/folders that are anywhere in object after the copy operation (but not to object itself).

    Specify type with a dash (-), followed by a space, and then a string (for example, - file).

'permissions' Section Example

The following example shows how to specify the 'permissions' section with the object, pattern, except, owner, mode, and type instructions. This example applies to Amazon Linux, Ubuntu Server, and RHEL instances only. In this example, assume the following files and folders are copied to the instance in this hierarchy:

/tmp `-- my-app |-- my-file-1.txt |-- my-file-2.txt |-- my-file-3.txt |-- my-folder-1 | |-- my-file-4.txt | |-- my-file-5.txt | `-- my-file-6.txt `-- my-folder-2 |-- my-file-7.txt |-- my-file-8.txt |-- my-file-9.txt `-- my-folder-3

The following AppSpec file shows how to set permissions on these files and folders after they are copied:

version: 0.0 os: linux # Copy over all of the folders and files with the permissions they # were originally assigned. files: - source: ./my-file-1.txt destination: /tmp/my-app - source: ./my-file-2.txt destination: /tmp/my-app - source: ./my-file-3.txt destination: /tmp/my-app - source: ./my-folder-1 destination: /tmp/my-app/my-folder-1 - source: ./my-folder-2 destination: /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2 # 1) For all of the files in the /tmp/my-app folder ending in -3.txt # (for example, just my-file-3.txt), owner = adm, group = wheel, and # mode = 464 (-r--rw-r--). permissions: - object: /tmp/my-app pattern: "*-3.txt" owner: adm group: wheel mode: 464 type: - file # 2) For all of the files ending in .txt in the /tmp/my-app # folder, but not for the file my-file-3.txt (for example, # just my-file-1.txt and my-file-2.txt), # owner = ec2-user and mode = 444 (-r--r--r--). - object: /tmp/my-app pattern: "*.txt" except: [my-file-3.txt] owner: ec2-user mode: 444 type: - file # 3) For all the files in the /tmp/my-app/my-folder-1 folder except # for my-file-4.txt and my-file-5.txt, (for example, # just my-file-6.txt), owner = operator and mode = 646 (-rw-r--rw-). - object: /tmp/my-app/my-folder-1 pattern: "**" except: [my-file-4.txt, my-file-5.txt] owner: operator mode: 646 type: - file # 4) For all of the files that are immediately under # the /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2 folder except for my-file-8.txt, # (for example, just my-file-7.txt and # my-file-9.txt), owner = ec2-user and mode = 777 (-rwxrwxrwx). - object: /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2 pattern: "**" except: [my-file-8.txt] owner: ec2-user mode: 777 type: - file # 5) For all folders at any level under /tmp/my-app that contain # the name my-folder but not # /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2/my-folder-3 (for example, just # /tmp/my-app/my-folder-1 and /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2), # owner = ec2-user and mode = 555 (dr-xr-xr-x). - object: /tmp/my-app pattern: "*my-folder*" except: [tmp/my-app/my-folder-2/my-folder-3] owner: ec2-user mode: 555 type: - directory # 6) For the folder /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2/my-folder-3, # group = wheel and mode = 564 (dr-xrw-r--). - object: /tmp/my-app/my-folder-2/my-folder-3 group: wheel mode: 564 type: - directory

The resulting permissions are as follows:

-r--r--r-- ec2-user root my-file-1.txt -r--r--r-- ec2-user root my-file-2.txt -r--rw-r-- adm wheel my-file-3.txt dr-xr-xr-x ec2-user root my-folder-1 -rw-r--r-- root root my-file-4.txt -rw-r--r-- root root my-file-5.txt -rw-r--rw- operator root my-file-6.txt dr-xr-xr-x ec2-user root my-folder-2 -rwxrwxrwx ec2-user root my-file-7.txt -rw-r--r-- root root my-file-8.txt -rwxrwxrwx ec2-user root my-file-9.txt dr-xrw-r-- root wheel my-folder-3

The following example shows how to specify the 'permissions' section with the addition of the acls and context instructions. This example applies to Amazon Linux, Ubuntu Server, and RHEL instances only.

permissions: - object: /var/www/html/WordPress pattern: "**" except: [/var/www/html/WordPress/ReadMe.txt] owner: bob group: writers mode: 644 acls: - u:mary:rw - u:sam:rw - m::rw context: user: unconfined_u type: httpd_sys_content_t range: s0 type: - file