CPU Training - AWS Deep Learning Containers

CPU Training

This section is for training on CPU-based containers.

For a complete list of Deep Learning Containers, see Deep Learning Containers Images. For tips about the best configuration settings if you're using the Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL), see AWS Deep Learning Containers Intel Math Kernel Library (MKL) Recommendations.

Apache MXNet (Incubating) CPU training

This tutorial guides you on training with Apache MXNet (Incubating) on your single node CPU cluster.

  1. Create a pod file for your cluster. A pod file will provide the instructions about what the cluster should run. This pod file will download the MXNet repository and run an MNIST example. Open vi or vim and copy and past the following content. Save this file as mxnet.yaml.

    apiVersion: v1 kind: Pod metadata: name: mxnet-training spec: restartPolicy: OnFailure containers: - name: mxnet-training image: 763104351884.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/mxnet-inference:1.6.0-cpu-py36-ubuntu16.04 command: ["/bin/sh","-c"] args: ["git clone -b v1.4.x https://github.com/apache/incubator-mxnet.git && python ./incubator-mxnet/example/image-classification/train_mnist.py"]
  2. Assign the pod file to the cluster using kubectl.

    $ kubectl create -f mxnet.yaml
  3. You should see the following output:

    pod/mxnet-training created
  4. Check the status. The name of the job "mxnet-training” was in the mxnet.yaml file. It will now appear in the status. If you're running any other tests or have previously run something, it appears in this list. Run this several times until you see the status change to “Running”.

    $ kubectl get pods

    You should see the following output:

    NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE mxnet-training 0/1 Running 8 19m
  5. Check the logs to see the training output.

    $ kubectl logs mxnet-training

    You should see something similar to the following output:

    Cloning into 'incubator-mxnet'... INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [0-100] Speed: 18437.78 samples/sec accuracy=0.777228 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [100-200] Speed: 16814.68 samples/sec accuracy=0.907188 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [200-300] Speed: 18855.48 samples/sec accuracy=0.926719 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [300-400] Speed: 20260.84 samples/sec accuracy=0.938438 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [400-500] Speed: 9062.62 samples/sec accuracy=0.938594 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [500-600] Speed: 10467.17 samples/sec accuracy=0.945000 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [600-700] Speed: 11082.03 samples/sec accuracy=0.954219 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [700-800] Speed: 11505.02 samples/sec accuracy=0.956875 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Batch [800-900] Speed: 9072.26 samples/sec accuracy=0.955781 INFO:root:Epoch[0] Train-accuracy=0.923424 ...
  6. Check the logs to watch the training progress. You can also continue to check “get pods” to refresh the status. When the status changes to “Completed”, the training job is done.

Next steps

To learn CPU-based inference on Amazon EKS using MXNet with Deep Learning Containers, see Apache MXNet (Incubating) CPU inference.

TensorFlow CPU training

This tutorial guides you on training TensorFlow models on your single node CPU cluster.

  1. Create a pod file for your cluster. A pod file will provide the instructions about what the cluster should run. This pod file will download Keras and run a Keras example. This example uses the TensorFlow framework. Open vi or vim and copy and paste the following content. Save this file as tf.yaml. You can use this with either TensorFlow or TensorFlow 2. To use it with TensorFlow 2, change the Docker image to a TensorFlow 2 image.

    apiVersion: v1 kind: Pod metadata: name: tensorflow-training spec: restartPolicy: OnFailure containers: - name: tensorflow-training image: 763104351884.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/tensorflow-inference:1.15.2-cpu-py36-ubuntu18.04 command: ["/bin/sh","-c"] args: ["git clone https://github.com/fchollet/keras.git && python /keras/examples/mnist_cnn.py"]
  2. Assign the pod file to the cluster using kubectl.

    $ kubectl create -f tf.yaml
  3. You should see the following output:

    pod/tensorflow-training created
  4. Check the status. The name of the job “tensorflow-training” was in the tf.yaml file. It will now appear in the status. If you're running any other tests or have previously run something, it appears in this list. Run this several times until you see the status change to “Running”.

    $ kubectl get pods

    You should see the following output:

    NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE tensorflow-training 0/1 Running 8 19m
  5. Check the logs to see the training output.

    $ kubectl logs tensorflow-training

    You should see something similar to the following output:

    Cloning into 'keras'... Using TensorFlow backend. Downloading data from https://s3.amazonaws.com/img-datasets/mnist.npz 8192/11490434 [..............................] - ETA: 0s 6479872/11490434 [===============>..............] - ETA: 0s 8740864/11490434 [=====================>........] - ETA: 0s 11493376/11490434 [==============================] - 0s 0us/step x_train shape: (60000, 28, 28, 1) 60000 train samples 10000 test samples Train on 60000 samples, validate on 10000 samples Epoch 1/12 2019-03-19 01:52:33.863598: I tensorflow/core/platform/cpu_feature_guard.cc:141] Your CPU supports instructions that this TensorFlow binary was not compiled to use: AVX512F 2019-03-19 01:52:33.867616: I tensorflow/core/common_runtime/process_util.cc:69] Creating new thread pool with default inter op setting: 2. Tune using inter_op_parallelism_threads for best performance. 128/60000 [..............................] - ETA: 10:43 - loss: 2.3076 - acc: 0.0625 256/60000 [..............................] - ETA: 5:59 - loss: 2.2528 - acc: 0.1445 384/60000 [..............................] - ETA: 4:24 - loss: 2.2183 - acc: 0.1875 512/60000 [..............................] - ETA: 3:35 - loss: 2.1652 - acc: 0.1953 640/60000 [..............................] - ETA: 3:05 - loss: 2.1078 - acc: 0.2422 ...
  6. You can check the logs to watch the training progress. You can also continue to check “get pods” to refresh the status. When the status changes to “Completed” you will know that the training job is done.

Next steps

To learn CPU-based inference on Amazon EKS using TensorFlow with Deep Learning Containers, see TensorFlow CPU inference.

PyTorch CPU training

This tutorial guides you on training with PyTorch on your single node CPU cluster.

  1. Create a pod file for your cluster. A pod file will provide the instructions about what the cluster should run. This pod file will download the PyTorch repository and run an MNIST example. Open vi or vim, then copy and paste the following content. Save this file as pytorch.yaml.

    apiVersion: v1 kind: Pod metadata: name: pytorch-training spec: restartPolicy: OnFailure containers: - name: pytorch-training image: 763104351884.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/pytorch-training:1.5.1-cpu-py36-ubuntu16.04 command: - "/bin/sh" - "-c" args: - "git clone https://github.com/pytorch/examples.git && python examples/mnist/main.py --no-cuda" env: - name: OMP_NUM_THREADS value: "36" - name: KMP_AFFINITY value: "granularity=fine,verbose,compact,1,0" - name: KMP_BLOCKTIME value: "1"
  2. Assign the pod file to the cluster using kubectl.

    $ kubectl create -f pytorch.yaml
  3. You should see the following output:

    pod/pytorch-training created
  4. Check the status. The name of the job "pytorch-training” was in the pytorch.yaml file. It will now appear in the status. If you're running any other tests or have previously run something, it appears in this list. Run this several times until you see the status change to “Running”.

    $ kubectl get pods

    You should see the following output:

    NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE pytorch-training 0/1 Running 8 19m
  5. Check the logs to see the training output.

    $ kubectl logs pytorch-training

    You should see something similar to the following output:

    Cloning into 'examples'... Downloading http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/mnist/train-images-idx3-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw/train-images-idx3-ubyte.gz 9920512it [00:00, 40133996.38it/s] Extracting ../data/MNIST/raw/train-images-idx3-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw Downloading http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/mnist/train-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw/train-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz Extracting ../data/MNIST/raw/train-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw 32768it [00:00, 831315.84it/s] Downloading http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/mnist/t10k-images-idx3-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw/t10k-images-idx3-ubyte.gz 1654784it [00:00, 13019129.43it/s] Extracting ../data/MNIST/raw/t10k-images-idx3-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw Downloading http://yann.lecun.com/exdb/mnist/t10k-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw/t10k-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz 8192it [00:00, 337197.38it/s] Extracting ../data/MNIST/raw/t10k-labels-idx1-ubyte.gz to ../data/MNIST/raw Processing... Done! Train Epoch: 1 [0/60000 (0%)] Loss: 2.300039 Train Epoch: 1 [640/60000 (1%)] Loss: 2.213470 Train Epoch: 1 [1280/60000 (2%)] Loss: 2.170460 Train Epoch: 1 [1920/60000 (3%)] Loss: 2.076699 Train Epoch: 1 [2560/60000 (4%)] Loss: 1.868078 Train Epoch: 1 [3200/60000 (5%)] Loss: 1.414199 Train Epoch: 1 [3840/60000 (6%)] Loss: 1.000870
  6. Check the logs to watch the training progress. You can also continue to check “get pods” to refresh the status. When the status changes to “Completed” you will know that the training job is done.

See EKS Cleanup for information on cleaning up a cluster after you're done using it.

Amazon S3 Plugin for PyTorch

Deep Learning Containers include a plugin that enables you to use data from an Amazon S3 bucket for PyTorch training.

  1. To begin using the Amazon S3 plugin on Amazon EKS, check to make sure that your cluster instances have full access to Amazon S3. Create an IAM role that grants Amazon S3 access to an Amazon EC2 instance and attach the role to your instance. You can use the AmazonS3FullAccess or AmazonS3ReadOnlyAccess policies.

  2. Set up your AWS_REGION environment variable with the region of your choice.

    export AWS_REGION=us-east-1
  3. Create a pod file for your cluster. A pod file will provide the instructions about what the cluster should run. This pod file will use the PyTorch Amazon S3 plugin to access an example Amazon S3 dataset.

    Note

    Your CPU cluster should use c5.12xlarge nodes or greater for this example.

    Open vi or vim, then copy and paste the following content. Save this file as s3plugin.yaml.

    apiVersion: v1 kind: Pod metadata: name: pytorch-s3-plugin spec: restartPolicy: OnFailure containers: - name: pytorch-s3-plugin image: 763104351884.dkr.ecr.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/pytorch-training:1.8.1-cpu-py36-ubuntu18.04-v1.6 command: - "/bin/sh" - "-c" args: - "git clone https://github.com/aws/amazon-s3-plugin-for-pytorch.git && python amazon-s3-plugin-for-pytorch/examples/s3_imagenet_example.py" env: - name: OMP_NUM_THREADS value: "36" - name: KMP_AFFINITY value: "granularity=fine,verbose,compact,1,0" - name: KMP_BLOCKTIME value: "1"
  4. Assign the pod file to the cluster using kubectl.

    $ kubectl create -f s3plugin.yaml
  5. Check the status. The name of the job pytorch-s3-plugin that was specified in the s3plugin.yaml file will now appear alongside the status information. You can run the following command several times until you see the status change to “Running.”

    $ kubectl get pods

    You should see the following output:

    NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE pytorch-s3-plugin 0/1 Running 8 19m
  6. Check the logs to see more details.

    $ kubectl logs pytorch-s3-plugin

For more information, see the Amazon S3 Plugin for PyTorch repository.

Next steps

To learn CPU-based inference on Amazon EKS using PyTorch with Deep Learning Containers, see PyTorch CPU inference.