Step 2: Mounting your file system from an Amazon EC2 Linux instance - FSx for OpenZFS

Step 2: Mounting your file system from an Amazon EC2 Linux instance

You can mount your file system from an Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instance. This procedure uses an instance running Amazon Linux 2.

To mount your file system from Amazon EC2

  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. Create or select an Amazon EC2 instance running Amazon Linux 2 that is in the same virtual private cloud (VPC) as your file system. For more information about launching an instance, see Step 1: Launch an instance in the Amazon EC2 User Guide for Linux Instances.

  3. Connect to your Amazon EC2 Linux instance. For more information, see Connect to your Linux instance in the Amazon EC2 User Guide for Linux Instances.

  4. Open a terminal on your Amazon EC2 instance using secure shell (SSH), and log in with the appropriate credentials.

  5. Make a directory on your Amazon EC2 instance for the volume's local mount path with the following command. In the following example, replace fsx with your desired location.

    $ sudo mkdir /fsx
  6. Use the following mount command to mount your Amazon FSx for OpenZFS file system to the directory that you created. Replace the following:

    • Replace nfs-version with an NFS protocol version, such as 4.2.

    • Replace fs-dns-name with the DNS name or the IP address of the file system.

    • Replace volume-path with the path of the volume to mount. For example, use /fsx to mount the root volume or a path such as /fsx/sales to mount the top-level fsx/sales directory.

    • Replace local-mount-path with the directory path of your local mount path, such as /fsx for the directory you created in step 5.

    sudo mount -t nfs -o nfsvers=nfs-version fs-dns-name:volume-path local-mount-path

    The following example uses sample values.

    sudo mount -t nfs -o nfsvers=4.2 fs01234567.fsx.us-east-1.amazonaws.com:/fsx /fsx

    You can also use the IP address of the file system instead of its DNS name.

    sudo mount -t nfs -o nfsvers=4.2 198.51.100.5:/fsx /fsx

If you have issues with your Amazon EC2 instance (such as connections timing out), see Troubleshoot EC2 instances in the Amazon EC2 User Guide for Linux Instances.

For more information on mounting FSx for OpenZFS file systems from Linux, macOS, or Windows instances, see Mounting FSx for OpenZFS volumes.