Lumberyard
Legacy Reference

Setting Up an Animation File

For a character aiming in several directions, the system requires a certain number of poses that can be blended together to achieve poses in any intermediate direction. For best visual results, we recommend creating 15 poses, although 9 poses might be enough in many cases. If you provide 9 poses, the system extrapolates from these poses to create 15 poses.

When you export the poses, they become a single animation file, with one pose per frame. Part of the file name should match the AnimToken provided in the .chrparams aim IK definition. For example, if the AnimToken parameter is set to AimPoses, the name for the animation file that contains the aim poses could be Troop_AimPoses. Naming this file is important because Lumberyard uses the name that is assigned in the AnimToken as a filter. That way Lumberyard can properly read and compile the animation data as an aim pose and not a regular animation.

When creating aim poses, you can use an underlying animation pose, such as standing idle, as a starting point. Aim poses that are created from a starting animation are applied on top of similar animations. If the underlying animation that is currently playing for a character is different enough—for example, crouching—you might need to create aim poses for that specific case to achieve better quality animations.

The order of the poses in the animation is also important. Reference the grid visual in the following images for the top, middle, and bottom rows.

As you create poses, keep in mind the following. This information assumes that you start on frame 1 for your aim poses animation.

Note

Although the aim pose might appear unnatural, try to make the poses as extreme as possible. You can then set limits using the game code.

  • The top row in the grid should have the character aiming upward. If you're using 15 aim poses, the top row comprises frames 1–5. If you're using 9 aim poses, the top row comprises frames 1–3.

    • The first aim pose frame in the top row (frame 1) should have the character aiming up and to the right of the character.

    • The middle aim pose frame in the top row (frame 3 of 15 or frame 2 of 9) should have the character aiming up and forward.

    • The last aim pose frame in the top row (frame 5 of 15 or frame 3 of 9) should have the character aiming up and to the left of the character.

  • The middle row in the grid should have the character aiming at eye level, with the weapon parallel to the ground. If you're using 15 aim poses, this row comprises frames 6–10. If you're using 9 aim poses, this row comprises frames 4–6.

    • The first aim pose frame in the middle row (frame 6 of 15 or frame 4 of 9) should have the character aiming at eye level and to the right of the character.

    • The middle aim pose frame in the middle row (frame 8 of 15 or frame 5 of 9) should have the character aiming at eye level and forward.

    • The last aim pose frame in the middle row (frame 10 of 15 or frame 6 of 9) should have the character aiming at eye level and to the left of the character.

  • The bottom row in the grid should have the character aiming downward. If you're using 15 aim poses, the bottom row comprises frames 11–15. If you're using 9 aim poses, the bottom row comprises frames 7–9.

    • The first aim pose frame in the bottom row (frame 11 of 15 or frame 7 of 9) should have the character aiming down and to the right of the character.

    • The middle aim pose frame in the bottom row (frame 13 of 15 or frame 8 of 9) should have the character aiming down and forward.

    • The last aim pose frame in the bottom row (frame 15 of 15 or frame 9 of 9) should have the character aiming down and to the left of the character.

When you export your aim pose animations, ensure that you include the exact frame count for your poses. For example, if you are using frames 1–15 for your aim poses, export frames 1–15 only. If you are using frames 1–9 for a 9-aim pose setup, export frames 1–9 only. Lumberyard specifically looks for exact frame count for aim poses, which is why the order of the poses is also important.