Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud
User Guide for Linux (API Version 2014-06-15)
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Monitoring Events for Your Instances

Instance status describes specific events that AWS may schedule for your instances, such as a reboot or retirement. These scheduled events are not frequent. If one of your instances will be affected by a scheduled event, you'll receive an email prior to the scheduled event with details about the event, as well as a start and end date. You can also view scheduled events for your instance by using the Amazon EC2 console, API, or CLI. For more information, see Viewing Scheduled Events.

There are different types of scheduled events:

  • Reboot: A reboot can be either an instance reboot or a system reboot.

  • System maintenance: An instance may be temporarily affected by network maintenance or power maintenance.

  • Instance retirement: An instance that's scheduled for retirement will be stopped or terminated.

  • Instance stop: An instance may need to be stopped in order to migrate it to new hardware.

If one of your instances is scheduled for any of the above events, you may be able to take actions to control the timing of the event, or to minimize downtime. For more information, see Working with an Instance That Has a Scheduled Event.

Viewing Scheduled Events

You can view scheduled events for your instances using the Amazon EC2 console, the command line interface (CLI), or the API.

Amazon EC2 Console

To view scheduled events for your instances using the console

  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. In the navigation pane, click Events. You can see a list of all resources with events associated with them. You can filter by instance or volume, or by specific status types.

  3. Alternatively, you can do the following to view upcoming scheduled events:

    1. In the navigation pane, click the EC2 Dashboard.

    2. Under Scheduled Events, you can see the events associated with your Amazon EC2 instances and volumes.

Command Line Interface and API

To view the status of your instances, use the ec2-describe-instance-status command, or the DescribeInstanceStatus API action.

Working with an Instance That Has a Scheduled Event

This section discusses tasks you can perform if your instance has a scheduled event. For all scheduled events, your course of action will differ depending on whether your instance’s root device volume is an Amazon EBS volume or an instance store volume. You can determine the root device type for an instance by checking the value of the Root device type field in the details pane on the Instances page.

Instances Scheduled for Reboot

AWS may schedule instances for a reboot in order to perform tasks such as applying patches, upgrades, or maintenance to the underlying host. There are two types of reboot events: system reboot and instance reboot. During a system reboot, your instance and the hardware supporting your instance is rebooted. During an instance reboot, your instance is rebooted, but the hardware supporting your instance is not rebooted. You can find out which type of reboot event is scheduled for your instance by using the Amazon EC2 console.

To view the type of scheduled reboot events

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console and open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. In the navigation pane, click Events.

  3. Select Instance resources from the filter list, and locate your instance.

  4. Look under the Event Type column. The column should indicate system-reboot or instance-reboot.

Scheduled reboot events start within their scheduled maintenance window and typically complete in a matter of minutes. After a reboot completes, your instance is available to use; it is not necessary to wait until the scheduled end time.

To verify that the reboot has occurred, check your scheduled events and verify that the instance no longer shows a scheduled event. We recommend that you check your instance after it is rebooted to ensure that your application is functioning as you expected.

Actions Required for Instances Scheduled for Reboot

No action is required on your part if one of your instances is scheduled for reboot. We recommend that you wait for the reboot to occur automatically within its scheduled maintenance window.

If you choose, you may perform the reboot yourself to control the timing of the event.

Instance Reboot

For instance reboot events, you can perform the reboot yourself (be careful to not shut down or terminate your instance) at any time before the scheduled reboot event begins. For more information, see Reboot Your Instance. After you reboot, any pending maintenance to the underlying host is performed automatically, and you can begin using your instance again after the instance has fully booted.

Note

After you perform the reboot, the scheduled event for the instance reboot is canceled immediately. The event's description is updated in the Amazon EC2 console to reflect this.

System Reboot

If your instance's root device is an Amazon EBS volume, you can stop and start it. For more information, see Stop and Start Your Instance. If your instance's root device is an instance store volume, you can terminate it and launch a replacement.

Important

Any data stored on an instance store volume is lost when the instance is stopped or terminated, and cannot be recovered. This includes instance store volumes that are attached to an instance that has an Amazon EBS volume as the root device

Instances Scheduled to Be Stopped or Retired

An instance is scheduled to be stopped or retired when AWS detects irreparable failure of the underlying hardware hosting your instance. When an instance reaches its scheduled retirement date, it is stopped or terminated by AWS. If your instance's root device is an Amazon EBS volume, the instance is stopped, and you can start it again at any time. If your instance's root device is an instance store volume, the instance is terminated, and cannot be used again.

Actions Required for Instances Scheduled to Be Stopped or Retired

If your instance's root device is an Amazon EBS volume, you can wait for the instance to be stopped or retired at the scheduled event start time. Alternatively, you can stop and start the instance yourself. Doing so migrates your instance to new hardware and help reduce unforeseen downtime. For more information about stopping your instance, as well as information about changes to your instance configuration when it's stopped, see Stop and Start Your Instance.

If your instance's root device is an instance store volume, we recommend that you launch a replacement instance from your most recent AMI, and migrate all necessary data to the replacement instance before the scheduled retirement. You can then terminate the instance, or wait for it to be automatically terminated when it's retired.

For more information about instances scheduled for retirement and how to manage them, see Instance Retirement.

Important

Any data stored on instance store volumes is lost when the instance is stopped or terminated, and cannot be recovered. This includes instance store volumes that are attached to an instance that has an Amazon EBS volume as the root device. Before the instance is stopped or terminated, ensure you retrieve any data from the instance store volume that you will need later.

Instances Scheduled for Maintenance

Instances are scheduled for maintenance when underlying Amazon EC2 hardware requires maintenance. There are two types of maintenance events: network maintenance and power maintenance. During network maintenance, scheduled instances lose network connectivity for a brief period of time. Normal network connectivity to your instance will be restored after maintenance is complete. During power maintenance, scheduled instances are offline for a brief period, and then rebooted.

Actions Required for Instances Scheduled for Maintenance

No action is required on your part if one of your instances is scheduled for maintenance. However, if you want to maintain normal operation during this time, you can launch a replacement instance from your most recent AMI, and migrate all necessary data to the replacement instance before the scheduled maintenance. Replacement instances are not affected by the same scheduled network or power maintenance.

For power maintenance, when a reboot is performed, all of your instance's configuration settings are retained.