Class: AWS.LexRuntime

Inherits:
AWS.Service show all
Identifier:
lexruntime
API Version:
2016-11-28
Defined in:
(unknown)

Overview

Constructs a service interface object. Each API operation is exposed as a function on service.

Sending a Request Using LexRuntime

var lexruntime = new AWS.LexRuntime();
lexruntime.postContent(params, function (err, data) {
  if (err) console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
  else     console.log(data);           // successful response
});

Locking the API Version

In order to ensure that the LexRuntime object uses this specific API, you can construct the object by passing the apiVersion option to the constructor:

var lexruntime = new AWS.LexRuntime({apiVersion: '2016-11-28'});

You can also set the API version globally in AWS.config.apiVersions using the lexruntime service identifier:

AWS.config.apiVersions = {
  lexruntime: '2016-11-28',
  // other service API versions
};

var lexruntime = new AWS.LexRuntime();

Version:

  • 2016-11-28

Constructor Summary collapse

Property Summary collapse

Properties inherited from AWS.Service

apiVersions

Method Summary collapse

Methods inherited from AWS.Service

makeRequest, makeUnauthenticatedRequest, waitFor, setupRequestListeners, defineService

Constructor Details

new AWS.LexRuntime(options = {}) ⇒ Object

Constructs a service object. This object has one method for each API operation.

Examples:

Constructing a LexRuntime object

var lexruntime = new AWS.LexRuntime({apiVersion: '2016-11-28'});

Options Hash (options):

  • params (map)

    An optional map of parameters to bind to every request sent by this service object. For more information on bound parameters, see "Working with Services" in the Getting Started Guide.

  • endpoint (String)

    The endpoint URI to send requests to. The default endpoint is built from the configured region. The endpoint should be a string like 'https://{service}.{region}.amazonaws.com'.

  • accessKeyId (String)

    your AWS access key ID.

  • secretAccessKey (String)

    your AWS secret access key.

  • sessionToken (AWS.Credentials)

    the optional AWS session token to sign requests with.

  • credentials (AWS.Credentials)

    the AWS credentials to sign requests with. You can either specify this object, or specify the accessKeyId and secretAccessKey options directly.

  • credentialProvider (AWS.CredentialProviderChain)

    the provider chain used to resolve credentials if no static credentials property is set.

  • region (String)

    the region to send service requests to. See AWS.LexRuntime.region for more information.

  • maxRetries (Integer)

    the maximum amount of retries to attempt with a request. See AWS.LexRuntime.maxRetries for more information.

  • maxRedirects (Integer)

    the maximum amount of redirects to follow with a request. See AWS.LexRuntime.maxRedirects for more information.

  • sslEnabled (Boolean)

    whether to enable SSL for requests.

  • paramValidation (Boolean|map)

    whether input parameters should be validated against the operation description before sending the request. Defaults to true. Pass a map to enable any of the following specific validation features:

    • min [Boolean] — Validates that a value meets the min constraint. This is enabled by default when paramValidation is set to true.
    • max [Boolean] — Validates that a value meets the max constraint.
    • pattern [Boolean] — Validates that a string value matches a regular expression.
    • enum [Boolean] — Validates that a string value matches one of the allowable enum values.
  • computeChecksums (Boolean)

    whether to compute checksums for payload bodies when the service accepts it (currently supported in S3 only)

  • convertResponseTypes (Boolean)

    whether types are converted when parsing response data. Currently only supported for JSON based services. Turning this off may improve performance on large response payloads. Defaults to true.

  • correctClockSkew (Boolean)

    whether to apply a clock skew correction and retry requests that fail because of an skewed client clock. Defaults to false.

  • s3ForcePathStyle (Boolean)

    whether to force path style URLs for S3 objects.

  • s3BucketEndpoint (Boolean)

    whether the provided endpoint addresses an individual bucket (false if it addresses the root API endpoint). Note that setting this configuration option requires an endpoint to be provided explicitly to the service constructor.

  • s3DisableBodySigning (Boolean)

    whether S3 body signing should be disabled when using signature version v4. Body signing can only be disabled when using https. Defaults to true.

  • retryDelayOptions (map)

    A set of options to configure the retry delay on retryable errors. Currently supported options are:

    • base [Integer] — The base number of milliseconds to use in the exponential backoff for operation retries. Defaults to 100 ms for all services except DynamoDB, where it defaults to 50ms.
    • customBackoff [function] — A custom function that accepts a retry count and returns the amount of time to delay in milliseconds. The base option will be ignored if this option is supplied.
  • httpOptions (map)

    A set of options to pass to the low-level HTTP request. Currently supported options are:

    • proxy [String] — the URL to proxy requests through
    • agent [http.Agent, https.Agent] — the Agent object to perform HTTP requests with. Used for connection pooling. Defaults to the global agent (http.globalAgent) for non-SSL connections. Note that for SSL connections, a special Agent object is used in order to enable peer certificate verification. This feature is only available in the Node.js environment.
    • connectTimeout [Integer] — Sets the socket to timeout after failing to establish a connection with the server after connectTimeout milliseconds. This timeout has no effect once a socket connection has been established.
    • timeout [Integer] — Sets the socket to timeout after timeout milliseconds of inactivity on the socket. Defaults to two minutes (120000).
    • xhrAsync [Boolean] — Whether the SDK will send asynchronous HTTP requests. Used in the browser environment only. Set to false to send requests synchronously. Defaults to true (async on).
    • xhrWithCredentials [Boolean] — Sets the "withCredentials" property of an XMLHttpRequest object. Used in the browser environment only. Defaults to false.
  • apiVersion (String, Date)

    a String in YYYY-MM-DD format (or a date) that represents the latest possible API version that can be used in all services (unless overridden by apiVersions). Specify 'latest' to use the latest possible version.

  • apiVersions (map<String, String|Date>)

    a map of service identifiers (the lowercase service class name) with the API version to use when instantiating a service. Specify 'latest' for each individual that can use the latest available version.

  • logger (#write, #log)

    an object that responds to .write() (like a stream) or .log() (like the console object) in order to log information about requests

  • systemClockOffset (Number)

    an offset value in milliseconds to apply to all signing times. Use this to compensate for clock skew when your system may be out of sync with the service time. Note that this configuration option can only be applied to the global AWS.config object and cannot be overridden in service-specific configuration. Defaults to 0 milliseconds.

  • signatureVersion (String)

    the signature version to sign requests with (overriding the API configuration). Possible values are: 'v2', 'v3', 'v4'.

  • signatureCache (Boolean)

    whether the signature to sign requests with (overriding the API configuration) is cached. Only applies to the signature version 'v4'. Defaults to true.

  • dynamoDbCrc32 (Boolean)

    whether to validate the CRC32 checksum of HTTP response bodies returned by DynamoDB. Default: true.

Property Details

endpointAWS.Endpoint (readwrite)

Returns an Endpoint object representing the endpoint URL for service requests.

Returns:

  • (AWS.Endpoint)

    an Endpoint object representing the endpoint URL for service requests.

Method Details

postContent(params = {}, callback) ⇒ AWS.Request

Sends user input (text or speech) to Amazon Lex. Clients use this API to send text and audio requests to Amazon Lex at runtime. Amazon Lex interprets the user input using the machine learning model that it built for the bot.

The PostContent operation supports audio input at 8kHz and 16kHz. You can use 8kHz audio to achieve higher speech recognition accuracy in telephone audio applications.

In response, Amazon Lex returns the next message to convey to the user. Consider the following example messages:

  • For a user input "I would like a pizza," Amazon Lex might return a response with a message eliciting slot data (for example, PizzaSize): "What size pizza would you like?".

  • After the user provides all of the pizza order information, Amazon Lex might return a response with a message to get user confirmation: "Order the pizza?".

  • After the user replies "Yes" to the confirmation prompt, Amazon Lex might return a conclusion statement: "Thank you, your cheese pizza has been ordered.".

Not all Amazon Lex messages require a response from the user. For example, conclusion statements do not require a response. Some messages require only a yes or no response. In addition to the message, Amazon Lex provides additional context about the message in the response that you can use to enhance client behavior, such as displaying the appropriate client user interface. Consider the following examples:

  • If the message is to elicit slot data, Amazon Lex returns the following context information:

    • x-amz-lex-dialog-state header set to ElicitSlot

    • x-amz-lex-intent-name header set to the intent name in the current context

    • x-amz-lex-slot-to-elicit header set to the slot name for which the message is eliciting information

    • x-amz-lex-slots header set to a map of slots configured for the intent with their current values

  • If the message is a confirmation prompt, the x-amz-lex-dialog-state header is set to Confirmation and the x-amz-lex-slot-to-elicit header is omitted.

  • If the message is a clarification prompt configured for the intent, indicating that the user intent is not understood, the x-amz-dialog-state header is set to ElicitIntent and the x-amz-slot-to-elicit header is omitted.

In addition, Amazon Lex also returns your application-specific sessionAttributes. For more information, see Managing Conversation Context.

Service Reference:

Examples:

Calling the postContent operation

var params = {
  botAlias: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  botName: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  contentType: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  inputStream: new Buffer('...') || 'STRING_VALUE' || streamObject, /* required */
  userId: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  accept: 'STRING_VALUE',
  requestAttributes: any /* This value will be JSON encoded on your behalf with JSON.stringify() */,
  sessionAttributes: any /* This value will be JSON encoded on your behalf with JSON.stringify() */
};
lexruntime.postContent(params, function(err, data) {
  if (err) console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
  else     console.log(data);           // successful response
});

Parameters:

  • params (Object) (defaults to: {})
    • botName — (String)

      Name of the Amazon Lex bot.

    • botAlias — (String)

      Alias of the Amazon Lex bot.

    • userId — (String)

      The ID of the client application user. Amazon Lex uses this to identify a user's conversation with your bot. At runtime, each request must contain the userID field.

      To decide the user ID to use for your application, consider the following factors.

      • The userID field must not contain any personally identifiable information of the user, for example, name, personal identification numbers, or other end user personal information.

      • If you want a user to start a conversation on one device and continue on another device, use a user-specific identifier.

      • If you want the same user to be able to have two independent conversations on two different devices, choose a device-specific identifier.

      • A user can't have two independent conversations with two different versions of the same bot. For example, a user can't have a conversation with the PROD and BETA versions of the same bot. If you anticipate that a user will need to have conversation with two different versions, for example, while testing, include the bot alias in the user ID to separate the two conversations.

    • sessionAttributes — (String)

      You pass this value as the x-amz-lex-session-attributes HTTP header.

      Application-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application. The value must be a JSON serialized and base64 encoded map with string keys and values. The total size of the sessionAttributes and requestAttributes headers is limited to 12 KB.

      For more information, see Setting Session Attributes.

    • requestAttributes — (String)

      You pass this value as the x-amz-lex-request-attributes HTTP header.

      Request-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application. The value must be a JSON serialized and base64 encoded map with string keys and values. The total size of the requestAttributes and sessionAttributes headers is limited to 12 KB.

      The namespace x-amz-lex: is reserved for special attributes. Don't create any request attributes with the prefix x-amz-lex:.

      For more information, see Setting Request Attributes.

    • contentType — (String)

      You pass this value as the Content-Type HTTP header.

      Indicates the audio format or text. The header value must start with one of the following prefixes:

      • PCM format, audio data must be in little-endian byte order.

        • audio/l16; rate=16000; channels=1

        • audio/x-l16; sample-rate=16000; channel-count=1

        • audio/lpcm; sample-rate=8000; sample-size-bits=16; channel-count=1; is-big-endian=false

      • Opus format

        • audio/x-cbr-opus-with-preamble; preamble-size=0; bit-rate=256000; frame-size-milliseconds=4

      • Text format

        • text/plain; charset=utf-8

    • accept — (String)

      You pass this value as the Accept HTTP header.

      The message Amazon Lex returns in the response can be either text or speech based on the Accept HTTP header value in the request.

      • If the value is text/plain; charset=utf-8, Amazon Lex returns text in the response.

      • If the value begins with audio/, Amazon Lex returns speech in the response. Amazon Lex uses Amazon Polly to generate the speech (using the configuration you specified in the Accept header). For example, if you specify audio/mpeg as the value, Amazon Lex returns speech in the MPEG format.

        The following are the accepted values:

        • audio/mpeg

        • audio/ogg

        • audio/pcm

        • text/plain; charset=utf-8

        • audio/* (defaults to mpeg)

    • inputStream — (Buffer, Typed Array, Blob, String, ReadableStream)

      User input in PCM or Opus audio format or text format as described in the Content-Type HTTP header.

      You can stream audio data to Amazon Lex or you can create a local buffer that captures all of the audio data before sending. In general, you get better performance if you stream audio data rather than buffering the data locally.

Callback (callback):

  • function(err, data) { ... }

    Called when a response from the service is returned. If a callback is not supplied, you must call AWS.Request.send() on the returned request object to initiate the request.

    Context (this):

    • (AWS.Response)

      the response object containing error, data properties, and the original request object.

    Parameters:

    • err (Error)

      the error object returned from the request. Set to null if the request is successful.

    • data (Object)

      the de-serialized data returned from the request. Set to null if a request error occurs. The data object has the following properties:

      • contentType — (String)

        Content type as specified in the Accept HTTP header in the request.

      • intentName — (String)

        Current user intent that Amazon Lex is aware of.

      • slots — (String)

        Map of zero or more intent slots (name/value pairs) Amazon Lex detected from the user input during the conversation.

        Amazon Lex creates a resolution list containing likely values for a slot. The value that it returns is determined by the valueSelectionStrategy selected when the slot type was created or updated. If valueSelectionStrategy is set to ORIGINAL_VALUE, the value provided by the user is returned, if the user value is similar to the slot values. If valueSelectionStrategy is set to TOP_RESOLUTION Amazon Lex returns the first value in the resolution list or, if there is no resolution list, null. If you don't specify a valueSelectionStrategy, the default is ORIGINAL_VALUE.

      • sessionAttributes — (String)

        Map of key/value pairs representing the session-specific context information.

      • message — (String)

        Message to convey to the user. It can come from the bot's configuration or a code hook (Lambda function). If the current intent is not configured with a code hook or if the code hook returned Delegate as the dialogAction.type in its response, then Amazon Lex decides the next course of action and selects an appropriate message from the bot configuration based on the current user interaction context. For example, if Amazon Lex is not able to understand the user input, it uses a clarification prompt message (For more information, see the Error Handling section in the Amazon Lex console). Another example: if the intent requires confirmation before fulfillment, then Amazon Lex uses the confirmation prompt message in the intent configuration. If the code hook returns a message, Amazon Lex passes it as-is in its response to the client.

      • dialogState — (String)

        Identifies the current state of the user interaction. Amazon Lex returns one of the following values as dialogState. The client can optionally use this information to customize the user interface.

        • ElicitIntent - Amazon Lex wants to elicit the user's intent. Consider the following examples:

          For example, a user might utter an intent ("I want to order a pizza"). If Amazon Lex cannot infer the user intent from this utterance, it will return this dialog state.

        • ConfirmIntent - Amazon Lex is expecting a "yes" or "no" response.

          For example, Amazon Lex wants user confirmation before fulfilling an intent. Instead of a simple "yes" or "no" response, a user might respond with additional information. For example, "yes, but make it a thick crust pizza" or "no, I want to order a drink." Amazon Lex can process such additional information (in these examples, update the crust type slot or change the intent from OrderPizza to OrderDrink).

        • ElicitSlot - Amazon Lex is expecting the value of a slot for the current intent.

          For example, suppose that in the response Amazon Lex sends this message: "What size pizza would you like?". A user might reply with the slot value (e.g., "medium"). The user might also provide additional information in the response (e.g., "medium thick crust pizza"). Amazon Lex can process such additional information appropriately.

        • Fulfilled - Conveys that the Lambda function has successfully fulfilled the intent.

        • ReadyForFulfillment - Conveys that the client has to fulfill the request.

        • Failed - Conveys that the conversation with the user failed.

          This can happen for various reasons, including that the user does not provide an appropriate response to prompts from the service (you can configure how many times Amazon Lex can prompt a user for specific information), or if the Lambda function fails to fulfill the intent.

        Possible values include:
        • "ElicitIntent"
        • "ConfirmIntent"
        • "ElicitSlot"
        • "Fulfilled"
        • "ReadyForFulfillment"
        • "Failed"
      • slotToElicit — (String)

        If the dialogState value is ElicitSlot, returns the name of the slot for which Amazon Lex is eliciting a value.

      • inputTranscript — (String)

        The text used to process the request.

        If the input was an audio stream, the inputTranscript field contains the text extracted from the audio stream. This is the text that is actually processed to recognize intents and slot values. You can use this information to determine if Amazon Lex is correctly processing the audio that you send.

      • audioStream — (Buffer, Typed Array, Blob, String, ReadableStream)

        The prompt (or statement) to convey to the user. This is based on the bot configuration and context. For example, if Amazon Lex did not understand the user intent, it sends the clarificationPrompt configured for the bot. If the intent requires confirmation before taking the fulfillment action, it sends the confirmationPrompt. Another example: Suppose that the Lambda function successfully fulfilled the intent, and sent a message to convey to the user. Then Amazon Lex sends that message in the response.

Returns:

  • (AWS.Request)

    a handle to the operation request for subsequent event callback registration.

postText(params = {}, callback) ⇒ AWS.Request

Sends user input (text-only) to Amazon Lex. Client applications can use this API to send requests to Amazon Lex at runtime. Amazon Lex then interprets the user input using the machine learning model it built for the bot.

In response, Amazon Lex returns the next message to convey to the user an optional responseCard to display. Consider the following example messages:

  • For a user input "I would like a pizza", Amazon Lex might return a response with a message eliciting slot data (for example, PizzaSize): "What size pizza would you like?"

  • After the user provides all of the pizza order information, Amazon Lex might return a response with a message to obtain user confirmation "Proceed with the pizza order?".

  • After the user replies to a confirmation prompt with a "yes", Amazon Lex might return a conclusion statement: "Thank you, your cheese pizza has been ordered.".

Not all Amazon Lex messages require a user response. For example, a conclusion statement does not require a response. Some messages require only a "yes" or "no" user response. In addition to the message, Amazon Lex provides additional context about the message in the response that you might use to enhance client behavior, for example, to display the appropriate client user interface. These are the slotToElicit, dialogState, intentName, and slots fields in the response. Consider the following examples:

  • If the message is to elicit slot data, Amazon Lex returns the following context information:

    • dialogState set to ElicitSlot

    • intentName set to the intent name in the current context

    • slotToElicit set to the slot name for which the message is eliciting information

    • slots set to a map of slots, configured for the intent, with currently known values

  • If the message is a confirmation prompt, the dialogState is set to ConfirmIntent and SlotToElicit is set to null.

  • If the message is a clarification prompt (configured for the intent) that indicates that user intent is not understood, the dialogState is set to ElicitIntent and slotToElicit is set to null.

In addition, Amazon Lex also returns your application-specific sessionAttributes. For more information, see Managing Conversation Context.

Service Reference:

Examples:

Calling the postText operation

var params = {
  botAlias: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  botName: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  inputText: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  userId: 'STRING_VALUE', /* required */
  requestAttributes: {
    '<String>': 'STRING_VALUE',
    /* '<String>': ... */
  },
  sessionAttributes: {
    '<String>': 'STRING_VALUE',
    /* '<String>': ... */
  }
};
lexruntime.postText(params, function(err, data) {
  if (err) console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
  else     console.log(data);           // successful response
});

Parameters:

  • params (Object) (defaults to: {})
    • botName — (String)

      The name of the Amazon Lex bot.

    • botAlias — (String)

      The alias of the Amazon Lex bot.

    • userId — (String)

      The ID of the client application user. Amazon Lex uses this to identify a user's conversation with your bot. At runtime, each request must contain the userID field.

      To decide the user ID to use for your application, consider the following factors.

      • The userID field must not contain any personally identifiable information of the user, for example, name, personal identification numbers, or other end user personal information.

      • If you want a user to start a conversation on one device and continue on another device, use a user-specific identifier.

      • If you want the same user to be able to have two independent conversations on two different devices, choose a device-specific identifier.

      • A user can't have two independent conversations with two different versions of the same bot. For example, a user can't have a conversation with the PROD and BETA versions of the same bot. If you anticipate that a user will need to have conversation with two different versions, for example, while testing, include the bot alias in the user ID to separate the two conversations.

    • sessionAttributes — (map<String>)

      Application-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application.

      For more information, see Setting Session Attributes.

    • requestAttributes — (map<String>)

      Request-specific information passed between Amazon Lex and a client application.

      The namespace x-amz-lex: is reserved for special attributes. Don't create any request attributes with the prefix x-amz-lex:.

      For more information, see Setting Request Attributes.

    • inputText — (String)

      The text that the user entered (Amazon Lex interprets this text).

Callback (callback):

  • function(err, data) { ... }

    Called when a response from the service is returned. If a callback is not supplied, you must call AWS.Request.send() on the returned request object to initiate the request.

    Context (this):

    • (AWS.Response)

      the response object containing error, data properties, and the original request object.

    Parameters:

    • err (Error)

      the error object returned from the request. Set to null if the request is successful.

    • data (Object)

      the de-serialized data returned from the request. Set to null if a request error occurs. The data object has the following properties:

      • intentName — (String)

        The current user intent that Amazon Lex is aware of.

      • slots — (map<String>)

        The intent slots that Amazon Lex detected from the user input in the conversation.

        Amazon Lex creates a resolution list containing likely values for a slot. The value that it returns is determined by the valueSelectionStrategy selected when the slot type was created or updated. If valueSelectionStrategy is set to ORIGINAL_VALUE, the value provided by the user is returned, if the user value is similar to the slot values. If valueSelectionStrategy is set to TOP_RESOLUTION Amazon Lex returns the first value in the resolution list or, if there is no resolution list, null. If you don't specify a valueSelectionStrategy, the default is ORIGINAL_VALUE.

      • sessionAttributes — (map<String>)

        A map of key-value pairs representing the session-specific context information.

      • message — (String)

        A message to convey to the user. It can come from the bot's configuration or a code hook (Lambda function). If the current intent is not configured with a code hook or the code hook returned Delegate as the dialogAction.type in its response, then Amazon Lex decides the next course of action and selects an appropriate message from the bot configuration based on the current user interaction context. For example, if Amazon Lex is not able to understand the user input, it uses a clarification prompt message (for more information, see the Error Handling section in the Amazon Lex console). Another example: if the intent requires confirmation before fulfillment, then Amazon Lex uses the confirmation prompt message in the intent configuration. If the code hook returns a message, Amazon Lex passes it as-is in its response to the client.

      • dialogState — (String)

        Identifies the current state of the user interaction. Amazon Lex returns one of the following values as dialogState. The client can optionally use this information to customize the user interface.

        • ElicitIntent - Amazon Lex wants to elicit user intent.

          For example, a user might utter an intent ("I want to order a pizza"). If Amazon Lex cannot infer the user intent from this utterance, it will return this dialogState.

        • ConfirmIntent - Amazon Lex is expecting a "yes" or "no" response.

          For example, Amazon Lex wants user confirmation before fulfilling an intent.

          Instead of a simple "yes" or "no," a user might respond with additional information. For example, "yes, but make it thick crust pizza" or "no, I want to order a drink". Amazon Lex can process such additional information (in these examples, update the crust type slot value, or change intent from OrderPizza to OrderDrink).

        • ElicitSlot - Amazon Lex is expecting a slot value for the current intent.

          For example, suppose that in the response Amazon Lex sends this message: "What size pizza would you like?". A user might reply with the slot value (e.g., "medium"). The user might also provide additional information in the response (e.g., "medium thick crust pizza"). Amazon Lex can process such additional information appropriately.

        • Fulfilled - Conveys that the Lambda function configured for the intent has successfully fulfilled the intent.

        • ReadyForFulfillment - Conveys that the client has to fulfill the intent.

        • Failed - Conveys that the conversation with the user failed.

          This can happen for various reasons including that the user did not provide an appropriate response to prompts from the service (you can configure how many times Amazon Lex can prompt a user for specific information), or the Lambda function failed to fulfill the intent.

        Possible values include:
        • "ElicitIntent"
        • "ConfirmIntent"
        • "ElicitSlot"
        • "Fulfilled"
        • "ReadyForFulfillment"
        • "Failed"
      • slotToElicit — (String)

        If the dialogState value is ElicitSlot, returns the name of the slot for which Amazon Lex is eliciting a value.

      • responseCard — (map)

        Represents the options that the user has to respond to the current prompt. Response Card can come from the bot configuration (in the Amazon Lex console, choose the settings button next to a slot) or from a code hook (Lambda function).

        • version — (String)

          The version of the response card format.

        • contentType — (String)

          The content type of the response.

          Possible values include:
          • "application/vnd.amazonaws.card.generic"
        • genericAttachments — (Array<map>)

          An array of attachment objects representing options.

          • title — (String)

            The title of the option.

          • subTitle — (String)

            The subtitle shown below the title.

          • attachmentLinkUrl — (String)

            The URL of an attachment to the response card.

          • imageUrl — (String)

            The URL of an image that is displayed to the user.

          • buttons — (Array<map>)

            The list of options to show to the user.

            • textrequired — (String)

              Text that is visible to the user on the button.

            • valuerequired — (String)

              The value sent to Amazon Lex when a user chooses the button. For example, consider button text "NYC." When the user chooses the button, the value sent can be "New York City."

Returns:

  • (AWS.Request)

    a handle to the operation request for subsequent event callback registration.