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AWS for DevOps
Getting Started Guide

Introducing the AWS for DevOps Walkthrough

Welcome to the AWS for DevOps Getting Started Guide. This guide contains information about AWS services for DevOps and a walkthrough you can use to experiment with those services.

What Is DevOps?

DevOps is a combination of cultural philosophies, practices, and tools that increases an organization's ability to deliver applications and services at high velocity, evolving and improving products at a faster pace than organizations using traditional software development and infrastructure management processes. This speed enables organizations to better serve their customers and compete more effectively in the market. Good DevOps practices encourage software development engineers and operations professionals to work better together. This results in closer collaboration and communication, leading to shorter time-to-market, better code quality and maintenance, and more reliable releases. For more information, see What Is DevOps? on DevOps and AWS.

AWS Services for DevOps

This walkthrough shows you how to use the following AWS services:

  • AWS CodeCommit, a fully managed source control service that makes it easy for you to host secure and highly scalable private Git repositories. For more information, see AWS CodeCommit.

  • AWS CodeDeploy, which automates code deployments to any instance, including Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances and on-premises servers. For more information, see AWS CodeDeploy.

  • AWS CodePipeline, a continuous delivery service for fast and reliable application updates. For more information, see AWS CodePipeline.

This walkthrough also features these AWS services:

  • AWS Elastic Beanstalk, an easy-to-use service for deploying and scaling web applications and services developed with Java, .NET, PHP, Node.js, Python, Ruby, Go, and Docker on servers such as Apache, Nginx, Passenger, and IIS. If you want to experiment with web applications and services in this walkthrough, you can use Elastic Beanstalk to more easily and confidently deploy web applications and services to these types of servers. For more information, see AWS Elastic Beanstalk.

  • AWS OpsWorks, a configuration management service that helps you configure and operate applications of all shapes and sizes using Chef. If you want to experiment with Chef in this walkthrough, you can use AWS OpsWorks to more easily and confidently deploy Chef cookbooks and applications. For more information, see AWS OpsWorks.

  • AWS CloudFormation, which is an easy way to create and manage a collection of related AWS resources, provisioning and updating them in an orderly and predictable fashion. This walkthrough uses AWS CloudFormation to help you complete the setup steps more quickly and more easily and reliably clean up the resources when you're done. For more information, see AWS CloudFormation.

  • AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), which enables you to control access to AWS services and resources. This walkthrough uses IAM to control access to AWS resources and the actions that you can perform with them. For more information, see AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM).

Understanding the Walkthrough

In this walkthrough, you will:

  1. Use AWS CloudFormation to give users access to the required AWS services and the corresponding AWS resources and actions.

  2. Create a source code repository in AWS CodeCommit and then use AWS CloudFormation to launch an Amazon EC2 instance that connects to the repository.

  3. Download the source code you will deploy and then push it into the repository.

  4. Use AWS CloudFormation to create the deployment target (an Amazon EC2 instance) and related AWS resources that are compatible with AWS CodeDeploy, Elastic Beanstalk, or AWS OpsWorks.

  5. Use AWS CloudFormation to create and run a pipeline in AWS CodePipeline to automate continuous delivery of the repository's source code to the deployment target.

  6. Verify the deployment's results on the deployment target.

  7. Make a change to the source code and then push it into the repository, triggering an automatic redeployment to the deployment target.

  8. Verify the deployed change on the deployment target.

  9. Use AWS CloudFormation to clean up the resources you created for this walkthrough.

Important

Many of the steps in this walkthrough use AWS CloudFormation templates to create required AWS resources, which may result in charges to your AWS account. To see the estimated costs, in the AWS CloudFormation console's Create stack wizard, on the Review page, choose the Cost link.

After you've completed this walkthrough, you will use AWS CloudFormation to delete these AWS resources to avoid possible ongoing charges to your AWS account.

For more information about pricing related to the services used in this walkthrough, see the following:

Next Steps

To start the walkthrough, go to Step 1: Service Access Setup.