AWS Lambda Construct Library

--- ![Stability: Stable](https://img.shields.io/badge/stability-Stable-success.svg?style=for-the-badge) ---

This construct library allows you to define AWS Lambda Functions.

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
import aws_cdk.aws_lambda as lambda
import path as path

fn = lambda.Function(self, "MyFunction",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X,
    handler="index.handler",
    code=lambda.Code.from_asset(path.join(__dirname, "lambda-handler"))
)

Handler Code

The lambda.Code class includes static convenience methods for various types of runtime code.

  • lambda.Code.fromBucket(bucket, key[, objectVersion]) - specify an S3 object that contains the archive of your runtime code.

  • lambda.Code.fromInline(code) - inline the handle code as a string. This is limited to supported runtimes and the code cannot exceed 4KiB.

  • lambda.Code.fromAsset(path) - specify a directory or a .zip file in the local filesystem which will be zipped and uploaded to S3 before deployment.

The following example shows how to define a Python function and deploy the code from the local directory my-lambda-handler to it:

# Example automatically generated. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
lambda.Function(self, "MyLambda",
    code=lambda.Code.from_asset(path.join(__dirname, "my-lambda-handler")),
    handler="index.main",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.PYTHON_3_6
)

When deploying a stack that contains this code, the directory will be zip archived and then uploaded to an S3 bucket, then the exact location of the S3 objects will be passed when the stack is deployed.

During synthesis, the CDK expects to find a directory on disk at the asset directory specified. Note that we are referencing the asset directory relatively to our CDK project directory. This is especially important when we want to share this construct through a library. Different programming languages will have different techniques for bundling resources into libraries.

Layers

The lambda.LayerVersion class can be used to define Lambda layers and manage granting permissions to other AWS accounts or organizations.

# Example automatically generated. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
layer = lambda.LayerVersion(stack, "MyLayer",
    code=lambda.Code.from_asset(path.join(__dirname, "layer-code")),
    compatible_runtimes=[lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X],
    license="Apache-2.0",
    description="A layer to test the L2 construct"
)

# To grant usage by other AWS accounts
layer.add_permission("remote-account-grant", account_id=aws_account_id)

# To grant usage to all accounts in some AWS Ogranization
# layer.grantUsage({ accountId: '*', organizationId });

lambda.Function(stack, "MyLayeredLambda",
    code=lambda.InlineCode("foo"),
    handler="index.handler",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X,
    layers=[layer]
)

Event Rule Target

You can use an AWS Lambda function as a target for an Amazon CloudWatch event rule:

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
import aws_cdk.aws_events_targets as targets
rule.add_target(targets.LambdaFunction(my_function))

Event Sources

AWS Lambda supports a variety of event sources.

In most cases, it is possible to trigger a function as a result of an event by using one of the add<Event>Notification methods on the source construct. For example, the s3.Bucket construct has an onEvent method which can be used to trigger a Lambda when an event, such as PutObject occurs on an S3 bucket.

An alternative way to add event sources to a function is to use function.addEventSource(source). This method accepts an IEventSource object. The module @aws-cdk/aws-lambda-event-sources includes classes for the various event sources supported by AWS Lambda.

For example, the following code adds an SQS queue as an event source for a function:

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
from aws_cdk.aws_lambda_event_sources import SqsEventSource
fn.add_event_source(SqsEventSource(queue))

The following code adds an S3 bucket notification as an event source:

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
from aws_cdk.aws_lambda_event_sources import S3EventSource
fn.add_event_source(S3EventSource(bucket,
    events=[s3.EventType.OBJECT_CREATED, s3.EventType.OBJECT_DELETED],
    filters=[NotificationKeyFilter(prefix="subdir/")]
))

See the documentation for the @aws-cdk/aws-lambda-event-sources module for more details.

Lambda with DLQ

A dead-letter queue can be automatically created for a Lambda function by setting the deadLetterQueueEnabled: true configuration.

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
import aws_cdk.aws_lambda as lambda

fn = lambda.Function(self, "MyFunction",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X,
    handler="index.handler",
    code=lambda.Code.from_inline("exports.handler = function(event, ctx, cb) { return cb(null, "hi"); }"),
    dead_letter_queue_enabled=True
)

It is also possible to provide a dead-letter queue instead of getting a new queue created:

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
import aws_cdk.aws_lambda as lambda
import aws_cdk.aws_sqs as sqs

dlq = sqs.Queue(self, "DLQ")
fn = lambda.Function(self, "MyFunction",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X,
    handler="index.handler",
    code=lambda.Code.from_inline("exports.handler = function(event, ctx, cb) { return cb(null, "hi"); }"),
    dead_letter_queue=dlq
)

See the AWS documentation to learn more about AWS Lambdas and DLQs.

Lambda with X-Ray Tracing

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
import aws_cdk.aws_lambda as lambda

fn = lambda.Function(self, "MyFunction",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X,
    handler="index.handler",
    code=lambda.Code.from_inline("exports.handler = function(event, ctx, cb) { return cb(null, "hi"); }"),
    tracing=lambda.Tracing.ACTIVE
)

See the AWS documentation to learn more about AWS Lambda’s X-Ray support.

Lambda with Reserved Concurrent Executions

# Example automatically generated without compilation. See https://github.com/aws/jsii/issues/826
import aws_cdk.aws_lambda as lambda

fn = lambda.Function(self, "MyFunction",
    runtime=lambda.Runtime.NODEJS_10_X,
    handler="index.handler",
    code=lambda.Code.from_inline("exports.handler = function(event, ctx, cb) { return cb(null, "hi"); }"),
    reserved_concurrent_executions=100
)

See the AWS documentation managing concurrency.

Log Group

Lambda functions automatically create a log group with the name /aws/lambda/<function-name> upon first execution with log data set to never expire.

The logRetention property can be used to set a different expiration period.

It is possible to obtain the function’s log group as a logs.ILogGroup by calling the logGroup property of the Function construct.

Note that, if either logRetention is set or logGroup property is called, a CloudFormation custom resource is added to the stack that pre-creates the log group as part of the stack deployment, if it already doesn’t exist, and sets the correct log retention period (never expire, by default).

Further note that, if the log group already exists and the logRetention is not set, the custom resource will reset the log retention to never expire even if it was configured with a different value.

Singleton Function

The SingletonFunction construct is a way to guarantee that a lambda function will be guaranteed to be part of the stack, once and only once, irrespective of how many times the construct is declared to be part of the stack. This is guaranteed as long as the uuid property and the optional lambdaPurpose property stay the same whenever they’re declared into the stack.

A typical use case of this function is when a higher level construct needs to declare a Lambda function as part of it but needs to guarantee that the function is declared once. However, a user of this higher level construct can declare it any number of times and with different properties. Using SingletonFunction here with a fixed uuid will guarantee this.

For example, the LogRetention construct requires only one single lambda function for all different log groups whose retention it seeks to manage.

Language-specific APIs

Language-specific higher level constructs are provided in separate modules: