Create an HTTPS listener for your Application Load Balancer - Elastic Load Balancing

Create an HTTPS listener for your Application Load Balancer

A listener checks for connection requests. You define a listener when you create your load balancer, and you can add listeners to your load balancer at any time.

To create an HTTPS listener, you must deploy at least one SSL server certificate on your load balancer. The load balancer uses a server certificate to terminate the front-end connection and then decrypt requests from clients before sending them to the targets. You must also specify a security policy, which is used to negotiate secure connections between clients and the load balancer.

If you need to pass encrypted traffic to targets without the load balancer decrypting it, you can create a Network Load Balancer or Classic Load Balancer with a TCP listener on port 443. With a TCP listener, the load balancer passes encrypted traffic through to the targets without decrypting it.

Application Load Balancers do not support ED25519 keys.

The information on this page helps you create an HTTPS listener for your load balancer. To add an HTTP listener to your load balancer, see Create an HTTP listener for your Application Load Balancer.

SSL certificates

The load balancer requires X.509 certificates (SSL/TLS server certificates). Certificates are a digital form of identification issued by a certificate authority (CA). A certificate contains identification information, a validity period, a public key, a serial number, and the digital signature of the issuer.

When you create a certificate for use with your load balancer, you must specify a domain name. The domain name on the certificate must match the custom domain name record so that we can verify the TLS connection. If they do not match, the traffic is not encrypted.

You must specify a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) for your certificate, such as www.example.com or an apex domain name such as example.com. You can also use an asterisk (*) as a wild card to protect several site names in the same domain. When you request a wild-card certificate, the asterisk (*) must be in the leftmost position of the domain name and can protect only one subdomain level. For instance, *.example.com protects corp.example.com, and images.example.com, but it cannot protect test.login.example.com. Also note that *.example.com protects only the subdomains of example.com, it does not protect the bare or apex domain (example.com). The wild-card name appears in the Subject field and in the Subject Alternative Name extension of the certificate. For more information about public certificates, see Requesting a public certificate in the AWS Certificate Manager User Guide.

We recommend that you create certificates for your load balancer using AWS Certificate Manager (ACM). ACM supports RSA certificates with 2048, 3072, and 4096-bit key lengths, and all ECDSA certificates. ACM integrates with Elastic Load Balancing so that you can deploy the certificate on your load balancer. For more information, see the AWS Certificate Manager User Guide.

Alternatively, you can use SSL/TLS tools to create a certificate signing request (CSR), then get the CSR signed by a CA to produce a certificate, then import the certificate into ACM or upload the certificate to AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM). For more information about importing certificates into ACM, see Importing certificates in the AWS Certificate Manager User Guide. For more information about uploading certificates to IAM, see Working with server certificates in the IAM User Guide.

Default certificate

When you create an HTTPS listener, you must specify exactly one certificate. This certificate is known as the default certificate. You can replace the default certificate after you create the HTTPS listener. For more information, see Replace the default certificate.

If you specify additional certificates in a certificate list, the default certificate is used only if a client connects without using the Server Name Indication (SNI) protocol to specify a hostname or if there are no matching certificates in the certificate list.

If you do not specify additional certificates but need to host multiple secure applications through a single load balancer, you can use a wildcard certificate or add a Subject Alternative Name (SAN) for each additional domain to your certificate.

Certificate list

After you create an HTTPS listener, it has a default certificate and an empty certificate list. You can optionally add certificates to the certificate list for the listener. Using a certificate list enables the load balancer to support multiple domains on the same port and provide a different certificate for each domain. For more information, see Add certificates to the certificate list.

The load balancer uses a smart certificate selection algorithm with support for SNI. If the hostname provided by a client matches a single certificate in the certificate list, the load balancer selects this certificate. If a hostname provided by a client matches multiple certificates in the certificate list, the load balancer selects the best certificate that the client can support. Certificate selection is based on the following criteria in the following order:

  • Public key algorithm (prefer ECDSA over RSA)

  • Hashing algorithm (prefer SHA over MD5)

  • Key length (prefer the largest)

  • Validity period

The load balancer access log entries indicate the hostname specified by the client and the certificate presented to the client. For more information, see Access log entries.

Certificate renewal

Each certificate comes with a validity period. You must ensure that you renew or replace each certificate for your load balancer before its validity period ends. This includes the default certificate and certificates in a certificate list. Renewing or replacing a certificate does not affect in-flight requests that were received by the load balancer node and are pending routing to a healthy target. After a certificate is renewed, new requests use the renewed certificate. After a certificate is replaced, new requests use the new certificate.

You can manage certificate renewal and replacement as follows:

  • Certificates provided by AWS Certificate Manager and deployed on your load balancer can be renewed automatically. ACM attempts to renew certificates before they expire. For more information, see Managed renewal in the AWS Certificate Manager User Guide.

  • If you imported a certificate into ACM, you must monitor the expiration date of the certificate and renew it before it expires. For more information, see Importing certificates in the AWS Certificate Manager User Guide.

  • If you imported a certificate into IAM, you must create a new certificate, import the new certificate to ACM or IAM, add the new certificate to your load balancer, and remove the expired certificate from your load balancer.

Security policies

Elastic Load Balancing uses a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) negotiation configuration, known as a security policy, to negotiate SSL connections between a client and the load balancer. A security policy is a combination of protocols and ciphers. The protocol establishes a secure connection between a client and a server and ensures that all data passed between the client and your load balancer is private. A cipher is an encryption algorithm that uses encryption keys to create a coded message. Protocols use several ciphers to encrypt data over the internet. During the connection negotiation process, the client and the load balancer present a list of ciphers and protocols that they each support, in order of preference. By default, the first cipher on the server's list that matches any one of the client's ciphers is selected for the secure connection.

Considerations:
  • Application Load Balancers support SSL renegotiation for target connections only.

  • Application Load Balancers do not support custom security policies.

  • The ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 policy is the default security policy for HTTPS listeners created using the AWS Management Console.

  • The ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 policy is the default security policy for HTTPS listeners created using the AWS CLI.

  • When you create an HTTPS listener, selecting a security policy is required.

    • We recommend the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 security policy, which includes TLS 1.3, and is backwards compatible with TLS 1.2.

  • You can choose the security policy that is used for front-end connections, but not backend connections.

    • For backend connections, if your HTTPS listener is using a TLS 1.3 security policy, the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-0-2021-06 security policy is used. Otherwise, the ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 security policy is used for backend connections.

  • To meet compliance and security standards that require disabling certain TLS protocol versions, or to support legacy clients requiring deprecated ciphers, you can use one of the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS- security policies. To view the TLS protocol version for requests to your Application Load Balancer, enable access logging for your load balancer and examine the corresponding access log entries. For more information, see Access logs for your Application Load Balancer.

  • You can restrict which security policies are available to users across your AWS accounts and AWS Organizations by using the Elastic Load Balancing condition keys in your IAM and service control policies (SCPs), respectively. For more information, see Service control policies (SCPs) in the AWS Organizations User Guide

TLS 1.3 security policies

Elastic Load Balancing provides the following TLS 1.3 security policies for Application Load Balancers:

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 (Recommended)

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Res-2021-06

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Ext1-2021-06

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Ext2-2021-06

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-1-2021-06

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-0-2021-06

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-3-2021-06

FIPS security policies

Important

All secure listeners attached to an Application Load Balancer must use either FIPS security policies or non-FIPS security policies; they cannot be mixed. If an existing Application Load Balancer has two or more listeners using non-FIPS policies and you want the listeners to use FIPS security policies instead, remove all listeners until there is only one. Change the security policy of the listener to FIPS and then create additional listeners using FIPS security policies. Alternatively, you can create a new Application Load Balancer with new listeners using only FIPS security policies.

The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) is a US and Canadian government standard that specifies the security requirements for cryptographic modules that protect sensitive information. To learn more, see Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140 on the AWS Cloud Security Compliance page.

All FIPS policies leverage the AWS-LC FIPS validated cryptographic module. To learn more, see the AWS-LC Cryptographic Module page on the NIST Cryptographic Module Validation Program site.

Elastic Load Balancing provides the following FIPS security policies for Application Load Balancers:

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-3-FIPS-2023-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Res-FIPS-2023-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04 (Recommended)

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Ext0-FIPS-2023-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Ext1-FIPS-2023-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-Ext2-FIPS-2023-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-1-FIPS-2023-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-0-FIPS-2023-04

FS supported policies

Elastic Load Balancing provides the following FS (Forward Secrecy) supported security policies for Application Load Balancers:

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-2-Res-2020-10

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-2-Res-2019-08

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-2-2019-08

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-1-2019-08

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06

TLS 1.0 - 1.2 security policies

Elastic Load Balancing provides the following TLS 1.0 - 1.2 security policies for Application Load Balancers:

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-Ext-2018-06

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-1-2017-01

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-0-2015-04

  • ELBSecurityPolicy-2015-05 (identical to ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08)

TLS protocols and ciphers

TLS 1.3

The following table describes the supported TLS protocols and ciphers for the available TLS 1.3 security policies.

Note: The ELBSecurityPolicy- prefix has been removed from the policy names in the security policies row.

Example: Security policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 is displayed as TLS13-1-2-2021-06.

Security policies TLS13-1-2-2021-06* TLS13-1-3-2021-06 TLS13-1-2-Res-2021-06 TLS13-1-2-Ext2-2021-06 TLS13-1-2-Ext1-2021-06 TLS13-1-1-2021-06 TLS13-1-0-2021-06
TLS Protocols
Protocol-TLSv1
Protocol-TLSv1.1
Protocol-TLSv1.2
Protocol-TLSv1.3
TLS Ciphers
TLS_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
TLS_AES_256_GCM_SHA384
TLS_CHACHA20_POLY1305_SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA
AES128-GCM-SHA256
AES128-SHA256
AES128-SHA
AES256-GCM-SHA384
AES256-SHA256
AES256-SHA
To create an HTTPS listener that uses a TLS 1.3 policy using the CLI

Use the create-listener command with any TLS 1.3 security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 security policy.

aws elbv2 create-listener --name my-listener \ --protocol HTTPS --port 443 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06
To modify an HTTPS listener to use a TLS 1.3 policy using the CLI

Use the modify-listener command with any TLS 1.3 security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 security policy.

aws elbv2 modify-listener \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06
To view the security policies used by a listener using the CLI

Use the describe-listeners command with the arn of your listener.

aws elbv2 describe-listeners \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0
To view the configuration of a TLS 1.3 security policy using the CLI

Use the describe-ssl-policies command with any TLS 1.3 security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06 security policy.

aws elbv2 describe-ssl-policies \ --names ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-2021-06
FIPS
Important

Policies ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-1-FIPS-2023-04 and ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-0-FIPS-2023-04 are provided for legacy compatibility only. While they utilize FIPS cryptography using the FIPS140 module, they may not conform to the latest NIST guidance for TLS configuration.

The following table describes the supported TLS protocols and ciphers for the available FIPS security policies.

Note: The ELBSecurityPolicy- prefix has been removed from the policy names in the security policies row.

Example: Security policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04 is displayed as TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04.

Security policies TLS13-1-3-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-2-Res-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-2-Ext0-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-2-Ext1-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-2-Ext2-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-1-FIPS-2023-04 TLS13-1-0-FIPS-2023-04
TLS Protocols
Protocol-TLSv1
Protocol-TLSv1.1
Protocol-TLSv1.2
Protocol-TLSv1.3
TLS Ciphers
TLS_AES_128_GCM_SHA256
TLS_AES_256_GCM_SHA384
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA
AES128-GCM-SHA256
AES128-SHA256
AES128-SHA
AES256-GCM-SHA384
AES256-SHA256
AES256-SHA
To create an HTTPS listener that uses a FIPS policy using the CLI

Use the create-listener command with any FIPS security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04 security policy.

aws elbv2 create-listener --name my-listener \ --protocol HTTPS --port 443 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04
To modify an HTTPS listener to use a FIPS policy using the CLI

Use the modify-listener command with any FIPS security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04 security policy.

aws elbv2 modify-listener \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04
To view the security policies used by a listener using the CLI

Use the describe-listeners command with the arn of your listener.

aws elbv2 describe-listeners \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0
To view the configuration of a FIPS security policy using the CLI

Use the describe-ssl-policies command with any FIPS security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04 security policy.

aws elbv2 describe-ssl-policies \ --names ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS13-1-2-FIPS-2023-04
FS

The following table describes the supported TLS protocols and ciphers for the available FS supported security policies.

Note: The ELBSecurityPolicy- prefix has been removed from the policy names in the security policies row.

Example: Security policy ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06 is displayed as FS-2018-06.

Security policies ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-2-Res-2020-10 ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-2-Res-2019-08 ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-2-2019-08 ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-1-1-2019-08 ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06
TLS Protocols
Protocol-TLSv1
Protocol-TLSv1.1
Protocol-TLSv1.2
TLS Ciphers
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA
AES128-GCM-SHA256
AES128-SHA256
AES128-SHA
AES256-GCM-SHA384
AES256-SHA256
AES256-SHA
To create an HTTPS listener that uses a FS supported policy using the CLI

Use the create-listener command with any FS supported security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06 security policy.

aws elbv2 create-listener --name my-listener \ --protocol HTTPS --port 443 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06
To modify an HTTPS listener to use a FS supported policy using the CLI

Use the modify-listener command with any FS supported security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06 security policy.

aws elbv2 modify-listener \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06
To view the security policies used by a listener using the CLI

Use the describe-listeners command with the arn of your listener.

aws elbv2 describe-listeners \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0
To view the configuration of a FS supported security policy using the CLI

Use the describe-ssl-policies command with any FS supported security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06 security policy.

aws elbv2 describe-ssl-policies \ --names ELBSecurityPolicy-FS-2018-06
TLS 1.0 - 1.2

The following table describes the supported TLS protocols and ciphers for the available TLS 1.0-1.2 security policies.

Note: The ELBSecurityPolicy- prefix has been removed from the policy names in the security policies row.

Example: Security policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-Ext-2018-06 is displayed as TLS-1-2-Ext-2018-06.

Security policies ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-Ext-2018-06 ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 ELBSecurityPolicy-TSL-1-1-2017-01 ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-0-2015-04
TLS Protocols
Protocol-TLSv1
Protocol-TLSv1.1
Protocol-TLSv1.2
TLS Ciphers
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384
ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA
ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA
AES128-GCM-SHA256
AES128-SHA256
AES128-SHA
AES256-GCM-SHA384
AES256-SHA256
AES256-SHA
DES-CBC3-SHA

* Do not use this policy unless you must support a legacy client that requires the DES-CBC3-SHA cipher, which is a weak cipher.

To create an HTTPS listener that uses a TLS 1.0-1.2 policy using the CLI

Use the create-listener command with any TLS 1.0-1.2 supported security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 security policy.

aws elbv2 create-listener --name my-listener \ --protocol HTTPS --port 443 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08
To modify an HTTPS listener to use a TLS 1.0-1.2 policy using the CLI

Use the modify-listener command with any TLS 1.0-1.2 supported security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 security policy.

aws elbv2 modify-listener \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08
To view the security policies used by a listener using the CLI

Use the describe-listeners command with the arn of your listener.

aws elbv2 describe-listeners \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:us-east-1:123456789012:listener/app/my-load-balancer/abcdef01234567890/1234567890abcdef0
To view the configuration of a TLS 1.0-1.2 security policy using the CLI

Use the describe-ssl-policies command with any TLS 1.0-1.2 supported security policy.

The example uses the ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08 security policy.

aws elbv2 describe-ssl-policies \ --names ELBSecurityPolicy-2016-08

Add an HTTPS listener

You configure a listener with a protocol and a port for connections from clients to the load balancer, and a target group for the default listener rule. For more information, see Listener configuration.

Prerequisites
  • To create an HTTPS listener, you must specify a certificate and a security policy. The load balancer uses the certificate to terminate the connection and decrypt requests from clients before routing them to targets. The load balancer uses the security policy when negotiating SSL connections with the clients.

  • To add a forward action to the default listener rule, you must specify an available target group. For more information, see Create a target group.

  • You can specify the same target group in multiple listeners, but these listeners must belong to the same load balancer. To use a target group with a load balancer, you must verify that it is not used by a listener for any other load balancer.

To add an HTTPS listener using the console
  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. On the navigation pane, choose Load Balancers.

  3. Select the load balancer.

  4. On the Listeners and rules tab, choose Add listener.

  5. For Protocol : Port, choose HTTPS and keep the default port or enter a different port.

  6. (Optional) To enable authentication, under Authentication select Use OpenID or Amazon Cognito, and provide the requested information. For more information, see Authenticate users using an Application Load Balancer.

  7. For Default actions, do one of the following:

    • Forward to target groups – Choose one or more target groups to forward traffic to. To add target groups choose Add target group. If using more than one target group, select a weight for each target group and review the associated percentage. You must enable group-level stickiness on a rule, if you’ve enabled stickiness on one or more of the target groups.

    • Redirect to URL – Specify the URL that client requests will be redirected to. This can be done by entering each part separately on the URI parts tab, or by entering the full address on the Full URL tab. For Status code you can configure redirects as either temporary (HTTP 302) or permanent (HTTP 301) based on your needs.

    • Return fixed response – Specify the Response code that will be returned to dropped client requests. Additionally, you can specify the Content type and Response body, but they're not required.

  8. For Security policy, we recommend that you always use the latest predefined security policy.

  9. For Default SSL/TLS certificate, the following options are available:

    • If you created or imported a certificate using AWS Certificate Manager, select From ACM, then select the certificate from Select a certificate.

    • If you imported a certificate using IAM, select From IAM, and then select your certificate from Select a certificate.

    • If you have a certificate to import but ACM is not available in your Region, select Import, then select To IAM. Type the name of the certificate in the Certificate name field. In Certificate private key, copy and paste the contents of the private key file (PEM-encoded). In Certificate body, copy and paste the contents of the public key certificate file (PEM-encoded). In Certificate Chain, copy and paste the contents of the certificate chain file (PEM-encoded), unless you are using a self-signed certificate and it's not important that browsers implicitly accept the certificate.

  10. (Optional) To enable mutual authentication, under Client certificate handling enable Mutual authentication (mTLS).

    When enabled, the default mutual TLS mode is passthrough.

    If you select Verify with Trust Store:

    • By default, connections with expired client certificates are rejected. To change this behavior expand Advanced mTLS settings, then under Client certificate expiration select Allow expired client certificates.

    • Under Trust Store choose an existing trust store, or choose New trust store.

      • If you chose New trust store, provide a Trust store name, the S3 URI Certificate Authority location, and optionally an S3 URI Certificate revocation list location.

  11. Choose Save.

To add an HTTPS listener using the AWS CLI

Use the create-listener command to create the listener and default rule, and the create-rule command to define additional listener rules.