Integrating Active Directory - AWS ParallelCluster

Integrating Active Directory

In this tutorial, you create a multiple user environment. This environment includes an AWS ParallelCluster that's integrated with an AWS Managed Microsoft AD (Active Directory) at corp.example.com. You configure an Admin user to manage the directory, a ReadOnly user to read the directory, and a user000 user to log into the cluster. You can use either the automated path or the manual path to create the networking resources, an Active Directory (AD), and the Amazon EC2 instance that you use to configure the AD. Regardless of the path, the infrastructure that you create is pre-configured to integrate AWS ParallelCluster using one of the following methods:

  • LDAPS with certificate verification (recommended as the most secure option)

  • LDAPS without certificate verification

  • LDAP

LDAP by itself doesn't provide encryption. To ensure secure transmission of potentially sensitive information, we strongly recommend that you use LDAPS (LDAP over TLS/SSL) for clusters integrated with ADs. For more information, see Enable server-side LDAPS using AWS Managed Microsoft AD in the AWS Directory Service Administration Guide.

After you create these resources, proceed to configure and create your cluster integrated with your Active Directory (AD). After the cluster is created, log in as the user you created. For more information about the configuration that you create in this tutorial, see Multiple user access to clusters and the DirectoryService configuration section.

This tutorial covers how to create an environment that supports multiple user access to clusters. This tutorial doesn't cover how you create and use an AWS Directory Service AD. The steps that you take to set up an AWS Managed Microsoft AD in this tutorial are provided for testing purposes only. They aren't provided to replace the official documentation and best practices you can find at AWS Managed Microsoft AD and Simple AD in the AWS Directory Service Administration Guide.

Note

Directory user passwords expire according to the directory password policy property definitions. For more information see Supported policy settings. To reset directory passwords with AWS ParallelCluster, see How to reset a user password and expired passwords.

Note

The directory domain controller IP addresses can change due to domain controller changes and directory maintenance. If you chose the automated quick create method to create the directory infrastructure, you must manually align the load balancer in front of the directory controllers when the directory IP addresses change. If you use the quick create method, the directory IP addresses aren't automatically aligned with the load balancers.

When using the AWS ParallelCluster command line interface (CLI) or API, you only pay for the AWS resources that are created when you create or update AWS ParallelCluster images and clusters. For more information, see AWS services used by AWS ParallelCluster.

The AWS ParallelCluster UI is built on a serverless architecture and you can use it within the AWS Free Tier category for most cases. For more information, see AWS ParallelCluster UI costs.

Prerequisites

As you go through the tutorial, replace inputs highlighted in red, such as region-id and d-abcdef01234567890, with your own names and IDs. Replace 0123456789012 with your AWS account number.

Choose the Automated tab to create the Active Directory (AD) infrastructure with an AWS CloudFormation quick create template.

Choose the Manual tab to manually create the AD infrastructure.

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console.

  2. Open CloudFormation Quick Create (region us-east-1) to create the following resources in the CloudFormation console:

    • A VPC with two subnets and routing for public access, if no VPC is specified.

    • An AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

    • An Amazon EC2 instance that's joined to the AD that you can use to manage the directory.

  3. In the Quick create stack page Parameters section, enter passwords for the following parameters:

    • AdminPassword

    • ReadOnlyPassword

    • UserPassword

    Make note of the passwords. You use them later on in this tutorial.

  4. For DomainName, enter corp.example.com

  5. For Keypair, enter the name of an Amazon EC2 key pair.

  6. Check the boxes to acknowledge each of the access capabilities at the bottom of the page.

  7. Choose Create stack.

  8. After the CloudFormation stack has reached the CREATE_COMPLETE state, choose the Outputs tab of the stack. Make a note of the output resource names and IDs because you need to use them in later steps. The outputs provide the information that's needed to create the cluster.

    A diagram that shows the created stack outputs in the AWS Management Console.
  9. To complete the exercises (Optional) Step 2: Manage AD users and groups, you need the directory ID. Choose Resources and scroll down to make note of the directory ID.

  10. Continue at (Optional) Step 2: Manage AD users and groups or Step 3: Create the cluster.

Create a VPC for the directory service with two subnets in different Availability Zones and an AWS Managed Microsoft AD.

Note
  • The directory and domain name is corp.example.com. The short name is CORP.

  • Change the Admin password in the script.

  • The Active Directory (AD) takes at least 15 minutes to create.

Use the following Python script to create the VPC, subnets, and AD resources in your local AWS Region. Save this file as ad.py and run it.

import boto3 import time from pprint import pprint vpc_name = "PclusterVPC" ad_domain = "corp.example.com" admin_password = "asdfASDF1234" Amazon EC2 = boto3.client("ec2") ds = boto3.client("ds") region = boto3.Session().region_name # Create the VPC, Subnets, IGW, Routes vpc = ec2.create_vpc(CidrBlock="10.0.0.0/16")["Vpc"] vpc_id = vpc["VpcId"] time.sleep(30) ec2.create_tags(Resources=[vpc_id], Tags=[{"Key": "Name", "Value": vpc_name}]) subnet1 = ec2.create_subnet(VpcId=vpc_id, CidrBlock="10.0.0.0/17", AvailabilityZone=f"{region}a")["Subnet"] subnet1_id = subnet1["SubnetId"] time.sleep(30) ec2.create_tags(Resources=[subnet1_id], Tags=[{"Key": "Name", "Value": f"{vpc_name}/subnet1"}]) ec2.modify_subnet_attribute(SubnetId=subnet1_id, MapPublicIpOnLaunch={"Value": True}) subnet2 = ec2.create_subnet(VpcId=vpc_id, CidrBlock="10.0.128.0/17", AvailabilityZone=f"{region}b")["Subnet"] subnet2_id = subnet2["SubnetId"] time.sleep(30) ec2.create_tags(Resources=[subnet2_id], Tags=[{"Key": "Name", "Value": f"{vpc_name}/subnet2"}]) ec2.modify_subnet_attribute(SubnetId=subnet2_id, MapPublicIpOnLaunch={"Value": True}) igw = ec2.create_internet_gateway()["InternetGateway"] ec2.attach_internet_gateway(InternetGatewayId=igw["InternetGatewayId"], VpcId=vpc_id) route_table = ec2.describe_route_tables(Filters=[{"Name": "vpc-id", "Values": [vpc_id]}])["RouteTables"][0] ec2.create_route(RouteTableId=route_table["RouteTableId"], DestinationCidrBlock="0.0.0.0/0", GatewayId=igw["InternetGatewayId"]) ec2.modify_vpc_attribute(VpcId=vpc_id, EnableDnsSupport={"Value": True}) ec2.modify_vpc_attribute(VpcId=vpc_id, EnableDnsHostnames={"Value": True}) # Create the Active Directory ad = ds.create_microsoft_ad( Name=ad_domain, Password=admin_password, Description="ParallelCluster AD", VpcSettings={"VpcId": vpc_id, "SubnetIds": [subnet1_id, subnet2_id]}, Edition="Standard", ) directory_id = ad["DirectoryId"] # Wait for completion print("Waiting for the directory to be created...") directories = ds.describe_directories(DirectoryIds=[directory_id])["DirectoryDescriptions"] directory = directories[0] while directory["Stage"] in {"Requested", "Creating"}: time.sleep(3) directories = ds.describe_directories(DirectoryIds=[directory_id])["DirectoryDescriptions"] directory = directories[0] dns_ip_addrs = directory["DnsIpAddrs"] pprint({"directory_id": directory_id, "vpc_id": vpc_id, "subnet1_id": subnet1_id, "subnet2_id": subnet2_id, "dns_ip_addrs": dns_ip_addrs})

The following is example output from the Python script.

{ "directory_id": "d-abcdef01234567890", "dns_ip_addrs": ["192.0.2.254", "203.0.113.237"], "subnet1_id": "subnet-021345abcdef6789", "subnet2_id": "subnet-1234567890abcdef0", "vpc_id": "vpc-021345abcdef6789" }

Make a note of the output resource names and IDs. You use them in later steps.

After the script completes, continue to the next step.

New Amazon EC2 console
  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console.

  2. If you don't have a role with the policies listed in step 4 attached, open the IAM console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/iam/. Otherwise, skip to step 5.

  3. Create the ResetUserPassword policy, replacing the red highlighted content with your AWS Region ID, Account ID, and the directory ID from the output of the script you ran to create the AD.

    ResetUserPassword

    { "Statement": [ { "Action": [ "ds:ResetUserPassword" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:ds:region-id:123456789012:directory/d-abcdef01234567890", "Effect": "Allow" } ] }
  4. Create an IAM role with the following policies attached.

  5. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  6. In the Amazon EC2 Dashboard, choose Launch Instance.

  7. In Application and OS Images, select a recent Amazon Linux 2 AMI.

  8. For Instance type, choose t2.micro.

  9. For Key pair, choose a key pair.

  10. For Network settings, choose Edit.

  11. For VPC, select the directory VPC.

  12. Scroll down and select Advanced details.

  13. In Advanced details, Domain join directory, choose corp.example.com.

  14. For IAM Instance profile, choose the role you created in step 1 or a role with policies listed in step 4 attached.

  15. In Summary choose Launch instance.

  16. Make note of the Instance ID (for example, i-1234567890abcdef0) and wait for the instance to finish launching.

  17. After the instance has launched, continue to the next step.

Old Amazon EC2 console
  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console.

  2. If you don't have a role with the policies listed in step 4 attached, open the IAM console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/iam/. Otherwise, skip to step 5.

  3. Create the ResetUserPassword policy. Replace the red highlighted content with your AWS Region ID, AWS account ID, and the directory ID from the output of the script you ran to create the Active Directory (AD).

    ResetUserPassword

    { "Statement": [ { "Action": [ "ds:ResetUserPassword" ], "Resource": "arn:aws:ds:region-id:123456789012:directory/d-abcdef01234567890", "Effect": "Allow" } ] }
  4. Create an IAM role with the following policies attached.

  5. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  6. In the Amazon EC2 Dashboard, choose Launch Instance.

  7. In Application and OS Images, select a recent Amazon Linux 2 AMI.

  8. For Instance type, choose t2.micro.

  9. For Key pair, choose a key pair.

  10. In Network settings, choose Edit.

  11. In Network settings, VPC, select the directory VPC.

  12. Scroll down and select Advanced details.

  13. In Advanced details, Domain join directory, choose corp.example.com.

  14. In Advanced details, Instance profile, choose the role that you created in step 1 or a role with the policies that are listed in step 4 attached.

  15. In Summary choose Launch instance.

  16. Make note of the Instance ID (for example, i-1234567890abcdef0) and wait for the instance to finish launching.

  17. After the instance has launched, continue to the next step.

  1. Connect to your instance and join the AD realm as admin.

    Run the following commands to connect to the instance.

    $ INSTANCE_ID="i-1234567890abcdef0"
    $ PUBLIC_IP=$(aws ec2 describe-instances \ --instance-ids $INSTANCE_ID \ --query "Reservations[0].Instances[0].PublicIpAddress" \ --output text)
    $ ssh -i ~/.ssh/keys/keypair.pem ec2-user@$PUBLIC_IP
  2. Install necessary software and join the realm.
    $ sudo yum -y install sssd realmd oddjob oddjob-mkhomedir adcli samba-common samba-common-tools krb5-workstation openldap-clients policycoreutils-python
  3. Replace the admin password with your admin password.
    $ ADMIN_PW="asdfASDF1234"
    $ echo $ADMIN_PW | sudo realm join -U Admin corp.example.com Password for Admin:

    If the preceding has succeeded, you're joined to the realm and can proceed to the next step.

  1. Create the ReadOnlyUser and an additional user.

    In this step, you use adcli and openldap-clients tools that you installed in a preceding step.

    $ echo $ADMIN_PW | adcli create-user -x -U Admin --domain=corp.example.com --display-name=ReadOnlyUser ReadOnlyUser
    $ echo $ADMIN_PW | adcli create-user -x -U Admin --domain=corp.example.com --display-name=user000 user000
  2. Verify the users are created:

    The directory DNS IP addresses are outputs of the Python script.

    $ DIRECTORY_IP="192.0.2.254"
    $ ldapsearch -x -h $DIRECTORY_IP -D Admin -w $ADMIN_PW -b "cn=ReadOnlyUser,ou=Users,ou=CORP,dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com"
    $ ldapsearch -x -h $DIRECTORY_IP -D Admin -w $ADMIN_PW -b "cn=user000,ou=Users,ou=CORP,dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com"

    By default, when you create a user with the ad-cli, the user is disabled.

  3. Reset and activate the user passwords from your local machine:

    Log out of your Amazon EC2 instance.

    Note
    • ro-p@ssw0rd is the password of ReadOnlyUser, retrieved from AWS Secrets Manager.

    • user-p@ssw0rd is the password of a cluster user that's provided when you connect (ssh) to the cluster.

    The directory-id is an output of the Python script.

    $ DIRECTORY_ID="d-abcdef01234567890"
    $ aws ds reset-user-password \ --directory-id $DIRECTORY_ID \ --user-name "ReadOnlyUser" \ --new-password "ro-p@ssw0rd" \ --region "region-id"
    $ aws ds reset-user-password \ --directory-id $DIRECTORY_ID \ --user-name "user000" \ --new-password "user-p@ssw0rd" \ --region "region-id"
  4. Add the password to a Secrets Manager secret.

    Now that you created a ReadOnlyUser and set the password, store it in a secret that AWS ParallelCluster uses for validating logins.

    Use Secrets Manager to create a new secret to hold the password for the ReadOnlyUser as the value. The secret value format must be plain text only (not JSON format). Make note of the secret ARN for future steps.

    $ aws secretsmanager create-secret --name "ADSecretPassword" \ --region region_id \ --secret-string "ro-p@ssw0rd" \ --query ARN \ --output text arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:ADSecretPassword-1234

Make a note of resource IDs. You use them in steps later on.

  1. Generate domain certificate, locally.
    $ PRIVATE_KEY="corp-example-com.key" CERTIFICATE="corp-example-com.crt" printf ".\n.\n.\n.\n.\ncorp.example.com\n.\n" | openssl req -x509 -sha256 -nodes -newkey rsa:2048 -keyout $PRIVATE_KEY -days 365 -out $CERTIFICATE
  2. Store the certificate to Secrets Manager to make it retrievable from within the cluster later on.
    $ aws secretsmanager create-secret --name example-cert \ --secret-string file://$CERTIFICATE \ --region region-id { "ARN": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:example-cert-123abc", "Name": "example-cert", "VersionId": "14866070-092a-4d5a-bcdd-9219d0566b9c" }
  3. Add the following policy to the IAM role that you created to join the Amazon EC2 instance to the AD domain.

    PutDomainCertificateSecrets

    { "Statement": [ { "Action": [ "secretsmanager:PutSecretValue" ], "Resource": [ "arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:example-cert-123abc", ], "Effect": "Allow" } ] }
  4. Import the certificate to AWS Certificate Manager (ACM).
    $ aws acm import-certificate --certificate fileb://$CERTIFICATE \ --private-key fileb://$PRIVATE_KEY \ --region region-id { "CertificateArn": "arn:aws:acm:region-id:123456789012:certificate/343db133-490f-4077-b8d4-3da5bfd89e72" }
  5. Create and the load balancer that is put in front of the Active Directory endpoints.
    $ aws elbv2 create-load-balancer --name CorpExampleCom-NLB \ --type network \ --scheme internal \ --subnets subnet-1234567890abcdef0 subnet-021345abcdef6789 \ --region region-id { "LoadBalancers": [ { "LoadBalancerArn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:loadbalancer/net/CorpExampleCom-NLB/3afe296bf4ba80d4", "DNSName": "CorpExampleCom-NLB-3afe296bf4ba80d4.elb.region-id.amazonaws.com", "CanonicalHostedZoneId": "Z2IFOLAFXWLO4F", "CreatedTime": "2022-05-05T12:56:55.988000+00:00", "LoadBalancerName": "CorpExampleCom-NLB", "Scheme": "internal", "VpcId": "vpc-021345abcdef6789", "State": { "Code": "provisioning" }, "Type": "network", "AvailabilityZones": [ { "ZoneName": "region-idb", "SubnetId": "subnet-021345abcdef6789", "LoadBalancerAddresses": [] }, { "ZoneName": "region-ida", "SubnetId": "subnet-1234567890abcdef0", "LoadBalancerAddresses": [] } ], "IpAddressType": "ipv4" } ] }
  6. Create the target group that's targeting the Active Directory endpoints.
    $ aws elbv2 create-target-group --name CorpExampleCom-Targets --protocol TCP \ --port 389 \ --target-type ip \ --vpc-id vpc-021345abcdef6789 \ --region region-id { "TargetGroups": [ { "TargetGroupArn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:targetgroup/CorpExampleCom-Targets/44577c583b695e81", "TargetGroupName": "CorpExampleCom-Targets", "Protocol": "TCP", "Port": 389, "VpcId": "vpc-021345abcdef6789", "HealthCheckProtocol": "TCP", "HealthCheckPort": "traffic-port", "HealthCheckEnabled": true, "HealthCheckIntervalSeconds": 30, "HealthCheckTimeoutSeconds": 10, "HealthyThresholdCount": 3, "UnhealthyThresholdCount": 3, "TargetType": "ip", "IpAddressType": "ipv4" } ] }
  7. Register the Active Directory (AD) endpoints into the target group.
    $ aws elbv2 register-targets --target-group-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:targetgroup/CorpExampleCom-Targets/44577c583b695e81 \ --targets Id=192.0.2.254,Port=389 Id=203.0.113.237,Port=389 \ --region region-id
  8. Create the LB listener with the certificate.
    $ aws elbv2 create-listener --load-balancer-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:loadbalancer/net/CorpExampleCom-NLB/3afe296bf4ba80d4 \ --protocol TLS \ --port 636 \ --default-actions Type=forward,TargetGroupArn=arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:targetgroup/CorpExampleCom-Targets/44577c583b695e81 \ --ssl-policy ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01 \ --certificates CertificateArn=arn:aws:acm:region-id:123456789012:certificate/343db133-490f-4077-b8d4-3da5bfd89e72 \ --region region-id "Listeners": [ { "ListenerArn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:listener/net/CorpExampleCom-NLB/3afe296bf4ba80d4/a8f9d97318743d4b", "LoadBalancerArn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:loadbalancer/net/CorpExampleCom-NLB/3afe296bf4ba80d4", "Port": 636, "Protocol": "TLS", "Certificates": [ { "CertificateArn": "arn:aws:acm:region-id:123456789012:certificate/343db133-490f-4077-b8d4-3da5bfd89e72" } ], "SslPolicy": "ELBSecurityPolicy-TLS-1-2-2017-01", "DefaultActions": [ { "Type": "forward", "TargetGroupArn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:targetgroup/CorpExampleCom-Targets/44577c583b695e81", "ForwardConfig": { "TargetGroups": [ { "TargetGroupArn": "arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:targetgroup/CorpExampleCom-Targets/44577c583b695e81" } ] } } ] } ] }
  9. Create the hosted zone to make the domain discoverable within the cluster VPC.
    $ aws route53 create-hosted-zone --name corp.example.com \ --vpc VPCRegion=region-id,VPCId=vpc-021345abcdef6789 \ --caller-reference "ParallelCluster AD Tutorial" { "Location": "https://route53.amazonaws.com/2013-04-01/hostedzone/Z09020002B5MZQNXMSJUB", "HostedZone": { "Id": "/hostedzone/Z09020002B5MZQNXMSJUB", "Name": "corp.example.com.", "CallerReference": "ParallelCluster AD Tutorial", "Config": { "PrivateZone": true }, "ResourceRecordSetCount": 2 }, "ChangeInfo": { "Id": "/change/C05533343BF3IKSORW1TQ", "Status": "PENDING", "SubmittedAt": "2022-05-05T13:21:53.863000+00:00" }, "VPC": { "VPCRegion": "region-id", "VPCId": "vpc-021345abcdef6789" } }
  10. Create a file that's named recordset-change.json with the following content. HostedZoneId is the canonical hosted zone ID of the load balancer.
    { "Changes": [ { "Action": "CREATE", "ResourceRecordSet": { "Name": "corp.example.com", "Type": "A", "Region": "region-id", "SetIdentifier": "example-active-directory", "AliasTarget": { "HostedZoneId": "Z2IFOLAFXWLO4F", "DNSName": "CorpExampleCom-NLB-3afe296bf4ba80d4.elb.region-id.amazonaws.com", "EvaluateTargetHealth": true } } } ] }
  11. Submit the recordset change to the hosted zone, this time using the hosted zone ID.
    $ aws route53 change-resource-record-sets --hosted-zone-id Z09020002B5MZQNXMSJUB \ --change-batch file://recordset-change.json { "ChangeInfo": { "Id": "/change/C0137926I56R3GC7XW2Y", "Status": "PENDING", "SubmittedAt": "2022-05-05T13:40:36.553000+00:00" } }
  12. Create a policy document policy.json with the following content.
    { "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Action": [ "secretsmanager:GetSecretValue" ], "Resource": [ "arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:example-cert-abc123" ], "Effect": "Allow" } ] }
  13. Create a policy document that is named policy.json with the following content.
    $ aws iam create-policy --policy-name ReadCertExample \ --policy-document file://policy.json { "Policy": { "PolicyName": "ReadCertExample", "PolicyId": "ANPAUUXUVBC42VZSI4LDY", "Arn": "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:policy/ReadCertExample-efg456", "Path": "/", "DefaultVersionId": "v1", "AttachmentCount": 0, "PermissionsBoundaryUsageCount": 0, "IsAttachable": true, "CreateDate": "2022-05-05T13:42:18+00:00", "UpdateDate": "2022-05-05T13:42:18+00:00" } }
  14. Continue to follow the steps at (Optional) Step 2: Manage AD users and groups or Step 3: Create the cluster.

In this step, you manage users and groups from an Amazon EC2 Amazon Linux 2 instance that's joined to the Active Delivery (AD) domain.

If you followed the automated path, restart and log in to the AD joined instance that was created as part of the automation.

If you followed the manual path, restart and log in to the instance that you created and joined to the AD in preceding steps.

In these steps, you use the adcli and openldap-clients tools that were installed in the instance as part of a preceding step.

Log in to an Amazon EC2 instance that is joined to the AD domain
  1. From the Amazon EC2 console, select the untitled Amazon EC2 instance that was created in previous steps. The instance state might be Stopped.

  2. If the instance state is Stopped, choose Instance state and then Start instance.

  3. After the status checks pass, select the instance and choose Connect and SSH in to the instance.

Manage users and groups when logged into an Amazon EC2 Amazon Linux 2 instance that's joined the AD

When you run the adcli commands with the -U "Admin" option, you're prompted to enter the AD Admin password. You include the AD Admin password as part of the ldapsearch commands.

  1. Create a user.
    $ adcli create-user "clusteruser" --domain "corp.example.com" -U "Admin"
  2. Set a user password.
    $ aws --region "region-id" ds reset-user-password --directory-id "d-abcdef01234567890" --user-name "clusteruser" --new-password "new-p@ssw0rd"
  3. Create a group.
    $ adcli create-group "clusterteam" --domain "corp.example.com" -U "Admin"
  4. Add a user to a group.
    $ adcli add-member "clusterteam" "clusteruser" --domain "corp.example.com" -U "Admin"
  5. Describe users and groups.

    Describe all users.

    $ ldapsearch "(&(objectClass=user))" -x -h "192.0.2.254" -b "DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -D "CN=Admin,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -w "p@ssw0rd"

    Describe a specific user.

    $ ldapsearch "(&(objectClass=user)(cn=clusteruser))" -x -h "192.0.2.254" -b "DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -D "CN=Admin,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -w "p@ssw0rd"

    Describe all users with a name pattern.

    $ ldapsearch "(&(objectClass=user)(cn=user*))" -x -h "192.0.2.254" -b "DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -D "CN=Admin,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -w "p@ssw0rd"

    Describe all users that are part of a specific group.

    $ ldapsearch "(&(objectClass=user)(memberOf=CN=clusterteam,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com))" -x -h "192.0.2.254" -b "DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -D "CN=Admin,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -w "p@ssw0rd"

    Describe all groups

    $ ldapsearch "objectClass=group" -x -h "192.0.2.254" -b "DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -D "CN=Admin,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -w "p@ssw0rd"

    Describe a specific group

    $ ldapsearch "(&(objectClass=group)(cn=clusterteam))" -x -h "192.0.2.254" -b "DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -D "CN=Admin,OU=Users,OU=CORP,DC=corp,DC=example,DC=com" -w "p@ssw0rd"
  6. Remove a user from a group.
    $ adcli remove-member "clusterteam" "clusteruser" --domain "corp.example.com" -U "Admin"
  7. Delete a user.
    $ adcli delete-user "clusteruser" --domain "corp.example.com" -U "Admin"
  8. Delete a group.
    $ adcli delete-group "clusterteam" --domain "corp.example.com" -U "Admin"

If you haven't exited the Amazon EC2 instance, do so now.

The environment is set up to create a cluster that can authenticate users against the Active Directory (AD).

Create a simple cluster configuration and provide the settings relevant to connecting to the AD. For more information, see the DirectoryService section.

Choose one of the following cluster configurations and copy it to a file that's named ldaps_config.yaml, ldaps_nocert_config.yaml, or ldap_config.yaml.

We recommend that you choose the LDAPS configuration with certificate verification. If you choose this configuration, you must also copy the bootstrap script to a file that's named active-directory.head.post.sh. And, you must store it in an Amazon S3 bucket as indicated in the configuration file.

Note
The following components must be changed.
  • KeyName: One of your Amazon EC2 keypairs.

  • SubnetId / SubnetIds: One of the subnet IDs provided in the output of the CloudFormation quick create stack (automated tutorial) or python script (manual tutorial).

  • Region: The Region where you created the AD infrastructure.

  • DomainAddr: This IP address is one of the DNS addresses of your AD service.

  • PasswordSecretArn: The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the secret that contains the password for the DomainReadOnlyUser.

  • BucketName: The name of the bucket that holds the bootstrap script.

  • AdditionalPolicies / Policy: The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the read domain certification policy ReadCertExample.

  • CustomActions / OnNodeConfigured / Args: The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of secret that holds the domain certification policy.

For better security posture, we suggest to use the HeadNode / Ssh / AllowedIps configuration to limit the SSH access to the head node.

Region: region-id Image: Os: alinux2 HeadNode: InstanceType: t2.micro Networking: SubnetId: subnet-abcdef01234567890 Ssh: KeyName: keypair Iam: AdditionalIamPolicies: - Policy: arn:aws:iam::123456789012:policy/ReadCertExample S3Access: - BucketName: my-bucket EnableWriteAccess: false KeyName: bootstrap/active-directory/active-directory.head.post.sh CustomActions: OnNodeConfigured: Script: s3://my-bucket/bootstrap/active-directory/active-directory.head.post.sh Args: - arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:example-cert-123abc - /opt/parallelcluster/shared/directory_service/domain-certificate.crt Scheduling: Scheduler: slurm SlurmQueues: - Name: queue0 ComputeResources: - Name: queue0-t2-micro InstanceType: t2.micro MinCount: 1 MaxCount: 10 Networking: SubnetIds: - subnet-abcdef01234567890 DirectoryService: DomainName: corp.example.com DomainAddr: ldaps://corp.example.com PasswordSecretArn: arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:ADSecretPassword-1234 DomainReadOnlyUser: cn=ReadOnlyUser,ou=Users,ou=CORP,dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com LdapTlsCaCert: /opt/parallelcluster/shared/directory_service/domain-certificate.crt LdapTlsReqCert: hard

Bootstrap script

After you create the bootstrap file and before you upload it to your S3 bucket, run chmod +x active-directory.head.post.sh to give AWS ParallelCluster run permission.

#!/bin/bash set -e CERTIFICATE_SECRET_ARN="$1" CERTIFICATE_PATH="$2" [[ -z $CERTIFICATE_SECRET_ARN ]] && echo "[ERROR] Missing CERTIFICATE_SECRET_ARN" && exit 1 [[ -z $CERTIFICATE_PATH ]] && echo "[ERROR] Missing CERTIFICATE_PATH" && exit 1 source /etc/parallelcluster/cfnconfig REGION="${cfn_region:?}" mkdir -p $(dirname $CERTIFICATE_PATH) aws secretsmanager get-secret-value --region $REGION --secret-id $CERTIFICATE_SECRET_ARN --query SecretString --output text > $CERTIFICATE_PATH
Note
The following components must be changed.
  • KeyName: One of your Amazon EC2 keypairs.

  • SubnetId / SubnetIds: One of the subnet IDs that's in the output of the CloudFormation quick create stack (automated tutorial) or python script (manual tutorial).

  • Region: The Region where you created the AD infrastructure.

  • DomainAddr: This IP address is one of the DNS addresses of your AD service.

  • PasswordSecretArn: The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the secret that contains the password for the DomainReadOnlyUser.

For better security posture, we suggest to use the HeadNode/Ssh/AllowedIps configuration to limit the SSH access to the head node.

Region: region-id Image: Os: alinux2 HeadNode: InstanceType: t2.micro Networking: SubnetId: subnet-abcdef01234567890 Ssh: KeyName: keypair Scheduling: Scheduler: slurm SlurmQueues: - Name: queue0 ComputeResources: - Name: queue0-t2-micro InstanceType: t2.micro MinCount: 1 MaxCount: 10 Networking: SubnetIds: - subnet-abcdef01234567890 DirectoryService: DomainName: corp.example.com DomainAddr: ldaps://corp.example.com PasswordSecretArn: arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:ADSecretPassword-1234 DomainReadOnlyUser: cn=ReadOnlyUser,ou=Users,ou=CORP,dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com LdapTlsReqCert: never
Note
The following components must be changed.
  • KeyName: One of your Amazon EC2 keypairs.

  • SubnetId / SubnetIds: One of the subnet IDs provided in the output of the CloudFormation quick create stack (automated tutorial) or python script (manual tutorial).

  • Region: The Region where you created the AD infrastructure.

  • DomainAddr: This IP address is one of the DNS addresses of your AD service.

  • PasswordSecretArn: The Amazon Resource Name (ARN) of the secret that contains the password for the DomainReadOnlyUser.

For better security posture, we suggest to use the HeadNode/Ssh/AllowedIps configuration to limit the SSH access to the head node.

Region: region-id Image: Os: alinux2 HeadNode: InstanceType: t2.micro Networking: SubnetId: subnet-abcdef01234567890 Ssh: KeyName: keypair Scheduling: Scheduler: slurm SlurmQueues: - Name: queue0 ComputeResources: - Name: queue0-t2-micro InstanceType: t2.micro MinCount: 1 MaxCount: 10 Networking: SubnetIds: - subnet-abcdef01234567890 DirectoryService: DomainName: dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com DomainAddr: ldap://192.0.2.254,ldap://203.0.113.237 PasswordSecretArn: arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:ADSecretPassword-1234 DomainReadOnlyUser: cn=ReadOnlyUser,ou=Users,ou=CORP,dc=corp,dc=example,dc=com AdditionalSssdConfigs: ldap_auth_disable_tls_never_use_in_production: True

Create your cluster with the following command.

$ pcluster create-cluster --cluster-name "ad-cluster" --cluster-configuration "./ldaps_config.yaml" { "cluster": { "clusterName": "pcluster", "cloudformationStackStatus": "CREATE_IN_PROGRESS", "cloudformationStackArn": "arn:aws:cloudformation:region-id:123456789012:stack/ad-cluster/1234567-abcd-0123-def0-abcdef0123456", "region": "region-id", "version": 3.7.0, "clusterStatus": "CREATE_IN_PROGRESS" } }

You can determine the status of the cluster with the following commands.

$ pcluster describe-cluster -n ad-cluster --region "region-id" --query "clusterStatus"

The output is as follows.

"CREATE_IN_PROGRESS" / "CREATE_COMPLETE"

When the status reaches "CREATE_COMPLETE", log in with the created user name and password.

$ HEAD_NODE_IP=$(pcluster describe-cluster -n "ad-cluster" --region "region-id" --query headNode.publicIpAddress | xargs echo)
$ ssh user000@$HEAD_NODE_IP

You can log in without the password by providing the SSH key that was created for the new user at /home/user000@HEAD_NODE_IP/.ssh/id_rsa.

If the ssh command succeeded, you have successfully connected to the cluster as a user that's authenticated to use the Active Directory (AD).

  1. From your local machine, delete the cluster.
    $ pcluster delete-cluster --cluster-name "ad-cluster" --region "region-id" { "cluster": { "clusterName": "ad-cluster", "cloudformationStackStatus": "DELETE_IN_PROGRESS", "cloudformationStackArn": "arn:aws:cloudformation:region-id:123456789012:stack/ad-cluster/1234567-abcd-0123-def0-abcdef0123456", "region": "region-id", "version": "3.7.0", "clusterStatus": "DELETE_IN_PROGRESS" } }
  2. Check the progress of the cluster being deleted.
    $ pcluster describe-cluster --cluster-name "ad-cluster" --region "region-id" --query "clusterStatus" "DELETE_IN_PROGRESS"

    After the cluster is successfully deleted, proceed to the next step.

Delete the Active Directory resources
  1. From https://console.aws.amazon.com/cloudformation/.

  2. In the navigation pane, choose Stacks.

  3. From the list of stacks, choose the AD stack (for example, pcluster-ad).

  4. Choose Delete.

  1. Delete the Amazon EC2 instance.
    1. From https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/, choose Instances in the navigation pane.

    2. From the list of instances, choose the instance that you created to add users to the directory.

    3. Choose Instance state, then Terminate instance.

  2. Delete the hosted zone.
    1. Create a recordset-delete.json with the following content. In this example, HostedZoneId is the canonical hosted zone ID of the load balancer.

      { "Changes": [ { "Action": "DELETE", "ResourceRecordSet": { "Name": "corp.example.com", "Type": "A", "Region": "region-id", "SetIdentifier": "pcluster-active-directory", "AliasTarget": { "HostedZoneId": "Z2IFOLAFXWLO4F", "DNSName": "CorpExampleCom-NLB-3afe296bf4ba80d4.elb.region-id.amazonaws.com", "EvaluateTargetHealth": true } } } ] }
    2. Submit the recordset change to the hosted zone using the hosted zone ID.

      $ aws route53 change-resource-record-sets --hosted-zone-id Z09020002B5MZQNXMSJUB \ --change-batch file://recordset-delete.json { "ChangeInfo": { "Id": "/change/C04853642A0TH2TJ5NLNI", "Status": "PENDING", "SubmittedAt": "2022-05-05T14:25:51.046000+00:00" } }
    3. Delete the hosted zone.

      $ aws route53 delete-hosted-zone --id Z09020002B5MZQNXMSJUB { "ChangeInfo": { "Id": "/change/C0468051QFABTVHMDEG9", "Status": "PENDING", "SubmittedAt": "2022-05-05T14:26:13.814000+00:00" } }
  3. Delete the LB listener.
    $ aws elbv2 delete-listener \ --listener-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:listener/net/CorpExampleCom-NLB/3afe296bf4ba80d4/a8f9d97318743d4b --region region-id
  4. Delete the target group.
    $ aws elbv2 delete-target-group \ --target-group-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:targetgroup/CorpExampleCom-Targets/44577c583b695e81 --region region-id
  5. Delete the load balancer.
    $ aws elbv2 delete-load-balancer \ --load-balancer-arn arn:aws:elasticloadbalancing:region-id:123456789012:loadbalancer/net/CorpExampleCom-NLB/3afe296bf4ba80d4 --region region-id
  6. Delete the policy that the cluster uses to read the certificate from Secrets Manager.
    $ aws iam delete-policy --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::123456789012:policy/ReadCertExample
  7. Delete the secret that contains the domain certificate.
    $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret \ --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:example-cert-123abc \ --region region-id { "ARN": "arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:example-cert-123abc", "Name": "example-cert", "DeletionDate": "2022-06-04T16:27:36.183000+02:00" }
  8. Delete the certificate from ACM.
    $ aws acm delete-certificate \ --certificate-arn arn:aws:acm:region-id:123456789012:certificate/343db133-490f-4077-b8d4-3da5bfd89e72 --region region-id
  9. Delete the Active Directory (AD) resources.
    1. Get the following resource IDs from the output of the python script ad.py:

      • AD ID

      • AD subnet IDs

      • AD VPC ID

    2. Delete the directory by running the following command.

      $ aws ds delete-directory --directory-id d-abcdef0123456789 --region region-id { "DirectoryId": "d-abcdef0123456789" }
    3. List the security groups in the VPC.

      $ aws ec2 describe-security-groups --filters '[{"Name":"vpc-id","Values":["vpc-07614ade95ebad1bc"]}]' --region region-id
    4. Delete the custom security group.

      $ aws ec2 delete-security-group --group-id sg-021345abcdef6789 --region region-id
    5. Delete the subnets.

      $ aws ec2 delete-subnet --subnet-id subnet-1234567890abcdef --region region-id
      $ aws ec2 delete-subnet --subnet-id subnet-021345abcdef6789 --region region-id
    6. Describe internet gateway.

      $ aws ec2 describe-internet-gateways \ --filters Name=attachment.vpc-id,Values=vpc-021345abcdef6789 \ --region region-id { "InternetGateways": [ { "Attachments": [ { "State": "available", "VpcId": "vpc-021345abcdef6789" } ], "InternetGatewayId": "igw-1234567890abcdef", "OwnerId": "123456789012", "Tags": [] } ] }
    7. Detach the internet gateway.

      $ aws ec2 detach-internet-gateway \ --internet-gateway-id igw-1234567890abcdef \ --vpc-id vpc-021345abcdef6789 \ --region region-id
    8. Delete the internet gateway.

      $ aws ec2 delete-internet-gateway \ --internet-gateway-id igw-1234567890abcdef \ --region region-id
    9. Delete the VPC.

      $ aws ec2 delete-vpc \ --vpc-id vpc-021345abcdef6789 \ --region region-id
    10. Delete the secret that contains the ReadOnlyUser password.

      $ aws secretsmanager delete-secret \ --secret-id arn:aws:secretsmanager:region-id:123456789012:secret:ADSecretPassword-1234" \ --region region-id