AWS Tools for Windows PowerShell
Command Reference

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Synopsis

Calls the AWS Security Token Service GetFederationToken API operation.

Syntax

Get-STSFederationToken
-Name <String>
-Policy <String>
-DurationInSeconds <Int32>
-PolicyArn <PolicyDescriptorType[]>

Description

Returns a set of temporary security credentials (consisting of an access key ID, a secret access key, and a security token) for a federated user. A typical use is in a proxy application that gets temporary security credentials on behalf of distributed applications inside a corporate network. You must call the GetFederationToken operation using the long-term security credentials of an IAM user. As a result, this call is appropriate in contexts where those credentials can be safely stored, usually in a server-based application. For a comparison of GetFederationToken with the other API operations that produce temporary credentials, see Requesting Temporary Security Credentials and Comparing the AWS STS API operations in the IAM User Guide. You can create a mobile-based or browser-based app that can authenticate users using a web identity provider like Login with Amazon, Facebook, Google, or an OpenID Connect-compatible identity provider. In this case, we recommend that you use Amazon Cognito or AssumeRoleWithWebIdentity. For more information, see Federation Through a Web-based Identity Provider. You can also call GetFederationToken using the security credentials of an AWS account root user, but we do not recommend it. Instead, we recommend that you create an IAM user for the purpose of the proxy application. Then attach a policy to the IAM user that limits federated users to only the actions and resources that they need to access. For more information, see IAM Best Practices in the IAM User Guide. The temporary credentials are valid for the specified duration, from 900 seconds (15 minutes) up to a maximum of 129,600 seconds (36 hours). The default is 43,200 seconds (12 hours). Temporary credentials that are obtained by using AWS account root user credentials have a maximum duration of 3,600 seconds (1 hour). The temporary security credentials created by GetFederationToken can be used to make API calls to any AWS service with the following exceptions:
  • You cannot use these credentials to call any IAM API operations.
  • You cannot call any STS API operations except GetCallerIdentity.
Permissions You must pass an inline or managed session policy to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policies to use as managed session policies. The plain text that you use for both inline and managed session policies shouldn't exceed 2048 characters. Though the session policy parameters are optional, if you do not pass a policy, then the resulting federated user session has no permissions. The only exception is when the credentials are used to access a resource that has a resource-based policy that specifically references the federated user session in the Principal element of the policy. When you pass session policies, the session permissions are the intersection of the IAM user policies and the session policies that you pass. This gives you a way to further restrict the permissions for a federated user. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those that are defined in the permissions policy of the IAM user. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide. For information about using GetFederationToken to create temporary security credentials, see GetFederationToken—Federation Through a Custom Identity Broker.

Parameters

-DurationInSeconds <Int32>
The duration, in seconds, that the session should last. Acceptable durations for federation sessions range from 900 seconds (15 minutes) to 129,600 seconds (36 hours), with 43,200 seconds (12 hours) as the default. Sessions obtained using AWS account root user credentials are restricted to a maximum of 3,600 seconds (one hour). If the specified duration is longer than one hour, the session obtained by using root user credentials defaults to one hour.
Required?False
Position?3
Accept pipeline input?False
AliasesDurationSeconds
-Name <String>
The name of the federated user. The name is used as an identifier for the temporary security credentials (such as Bob). For example, you can reference the federated user name in a resource-based policy, such as in an Amazon S3 bucket policy.The regex used to validate this parameter is a string of characters consisting of upper- and lower-case alphanumeric characters with no spaces. You can also include underscores or any of the following characters: =,.@-
Required?False
Position?1
Accept pipeline input?True (ByValue, )
-Policy <String>
An IAM policy in JSON format that you want to use as an inline session policy.You must pass an inline or managed session policy to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policies to use as managed session policies.This parameter is optional. However, if you do not pass any session policies, then the resulting federated user session has no permissions. The only exception is when the credentials are used to access a resource that has a resource-based policy that specifically references the federated user session in the Principal element of the policy.When you pass session policies, the session permissions are the intersection of the IAM user policies and the session policies that you pass. This gives you a way to further restrict the permissions for a federated user. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those that are defined in the permissions policy of the IAM user. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.The plain text that you use for both inline and managed session policies shouldn't exceed 2048 characters. The JSON policy characters can be any ASCII character from the space character to the end of the valid character list (\u0020 through \u00FF). It can also include the tab (\u0009), linefeed (\u000A), and carriage return (\u000D) characters.The characters in this parameter count towards the 2048 character session policy guideline. However, an AWS conversion compresses the session policies into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. This is the enforced limit. The PackedPolicySize response element indicates by percentage how close the policy is to the upper size limit.
Required?False
Position?2
Accept pipeline input?False
The Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) of the IAM managed policies that you want to use as a managed session policy. The policies must exist in the same account as the IAM user that is requesting federated access.You must pass an inline or managed session policy to this operation. You can pass a single JSON policy document to use as an inline session policy. You can also specify up to 10 managed policies to use as managed session policies. The plain text that you use for both inline and managed session policies shouldn't exceed 2048 characters. You can provide up to 10 managed policy ARNs. For more information about ARNs, see Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) and AWS Service Namespaces in the AWS General Reference.This parameter is optional. However, if you do not pass any session policies, then the resulting federated user session has no permissions. The only exception is when the credentials are used to access a resource that has a resource-based policy that specifically references the federated user session in the Principal element of the policy.When you pass session policies, the session permissions are the intersection of the IAM user policies and the session policies that you pass. This gives you a way to further restrict the permissions for a federated user. You cannot use session policies to grant more permissions than those that are defined in the permissions policy of the IAM user. For more information, see Session Policies in the IAM User Guide.The characters in this parameter count towards the 2048 character session policy guideline. However, an AWS conversion compresses the session policies into a packed binary format that has a separate limit. This is the enforced limit. The PackedPolicySize response element indicates by percentage how close the policy is to the upper size limit.
Required?False
Position?Named
Accept pipeline input?False
AliasesPolicyArns

Common Credential and Region Parameters

-AccessKey <String>
The AWS access key for the user account. This can be a temporary access key if the corresponding session token is supplied to the -SessionToken parameter.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-Credential <AWSCredentials>
An AWSCredentials object instance containing access and secret key information, and optionally a token for session-based credentials.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-ProfileLocation <String>

Used to specify the name and location of the ini-format credential file (shared with the AWS CLI and other AWS SDKs)

If this optional parameter is omitted this cmdlet will search the encrypted credential file used by the AWS SDK for .NET and AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio first. If the profile is not found then the cmdlet will search in the ini-format credential file at the default location: (user's home directory)\.aws\credentials. Note that the encrypted credential file is not supported on all platforms. It will be skipped when searching for profiles on Windows Nano Server, Mac, and Linux platforms.

If this parameter is specified then this cmdlet will only search the ini-format credential file at the location given.

As the current folder can vary in a shell or during script execution it is advised that you use specify a fully qualified path instead of a relative path.

Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-ProfileName <String>
The user-defined name of an AWS credentials or SAML-based role profile containing credential information. The profile is expected to be found in the secure credential file shared with the AWS SDK for .NET and AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio. You can also specify the name of a profile stored in the .ini-format credential file used with the AWS CLI and other AWS SDKs.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-NetworkCredential <PSCredential>
Used with SAML-based authentication when ProfileName references a SAML role profile. Contains the network credentials to be supplied during authentication with the configured identity provider's endpoint. This parameter is not required if the user's default network identity can or should be used during authentication.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-SecretKey <String>
The AWS secret key for the user account. This can be a temporary secret key if the corresponding session token is supplied to the -SessionToken parameter.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-SessionToken <String>
The session token if the access and secret keys are temporary session-based credentials.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-Region <String>
The system name of the AWS region in which the operation should be invoked. For example, us-east-1, eu-west-1 etc.
Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False
-EndpointUrl <String>

The endpoint to make the call against.

Note: This parameter is primarily for internal AWS use and is not required/should not be specified for normal usage. The cmdlets normally determine which endpoint to call based on the region specified to the -Region parameter or set as default in the shell (via Set-DefaultAWSRegion). Only specify this parameter if you must direct the call to a specific custom endpoint.

Required? False
Position? Named
Accept pipeline input? False

Inputs

You can pipe a String object to this cmdlet for the Name parameter.

Outputs

This cmdlet returns a Amazon.SecurityToken.Model.GetFederationTokenResponse object containing multiple properties. The object can also be referenced from properties attached to the cmdlet entry in the $AWSHistory stack.

Examples

Example 1

PS C:\>Get-STSFederationToken -Name "Bob" -Policy "...JSON policy..." -DurationInSeconds 3600
Requests a federated token valid for one hour using "Bob" as the name of the federated user. This name can be used to reference the federated user name in a resource-based policy (such as an Amazon S3 bucket policy). The supplied IAM policy, in JSON format, is used to scope down the permissions that are available to the IAM user. The supplied policy cannot grant more permissions than those granted to the requesting user, with the final permissions for the federated user being the most restrictive set based on the intersection of the passed policy and the IAM user policy.

Supported Version

AWS Tools for PowerShell: 2.x.y.z