AWS Snowball
Developer Guide

This guide is for the Snowball Edge. If you are looking for documentation for the Snowball, see the AWS Snowball User Guide.

Commands for the Snowball Client

Following, you can find information on the Snowball client commands, including examples of use and sample outputs.

Configuring a Profile for the Snowball Client

Every time you run a command for the Snowball client, you provide your manifest file, unlock code, and an IP address. You can get the first two of these from the AWS Snowball Management Console or the job management API. For more information on getting your manifest and unlock code, see Get Your Credentials and Tools.

You have the option of using the snowballEdge configure command to store the path to the manifest, the 29-character unlock code, and the endpoint as a profile. After configuration, you can use other Snowball client commands without having to manually type in these values for a particular job. After you configure the Snowball client, the information is saved in a plaintext JSON format to home directory/.aws/snowball/config/snowball-edge.config.

The endpoint is the IP address, with https:// added to it. You can locate the IP address for the AWS Snowball Edge device on the AWS Snowball Edge device's LCD display. When the AWS Snowball Edge device is connected to your network for the first time, it automatically gets a DHCP IP address, if a DHCP server is available. If you want to use a different IP address, you can change it from the LCD display. For more information, see Using an AWS Snowball Edge.

Important

Anyone who can access the configuration file can access the data on your Snowball Edge devices or clusters. Managing local access control for this file is one of your administrative responsibilities.

Usage

You can use this command in two ways: inline, or when prompted. This usage example shows the prompted method.

snowballEdge configure

Example Output

Configuration will stored at home directory\.aws\snowball\config\snowball-edge.config Snowball Edge Manifest Path: Path/to/manifest/file Unlock Code: 29 character unlock code Default Endpoint: https://192.0.2.0

You can have multiple profiles if you have multiple jobs at once, or if you want the option of managing a cluster from different endpoints. For more info on multiple AWS CLI profiles, see Named Profiles in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide.

Unlocking AWS Snowball Edge Devices

To unlock a standalone AWS Snowball Edge device, run the snowballEdge unlock-device command. To unlock a cluster, use the snowballEdge unlock-cluster command. These commands authenticate your access to the AWS Snowball Edge device.

Note

To unlock the devices associated with your job, the devices must be on site, plugged into power and network, and turned on. In addition, the LCD display on the AWS Snowball Edge device's front must indicate that the device is ready for use.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge unlock-device

Example Single Device Unlock Input

snowballEdge unlock-device

Example Single Device Unlock Output

Your Snowball Edge device is unlocking. You may determine the unlock state of your device using the describe-device command. Your Snowball Edge device will be available for use when it is in the UNLOCKED state.

Cluster Usage

When you unlock a cluster, you provide the endpoint for one of your nodes, and all the IP addresses for the other devices in your cluster.

snowballEdge unlock-cluster --endpoint https://192.0.2.0 --manifest-file Path/to/manifest/file --unlock-code 01234-abcde-ABCDE-01234 --device-ip-addresses 192.0.2.0 192.0.2.1 192.0.2.2 192.0.2.3 192.0.2.4

Example Cluster Unlock Output

Your Snowball Edge Cluster is unlocking. You may determine the unlock state of your cluster using the describe-device command. Your Snowball Edge Cluster will be available for use when your Snowball Edge devices are in the UNLOCKED state.

Updating a Snowball Edge

The following commands can be used to download and install updates for your Snowball Edge device. For procedures that use these commands, see Updating an AWS Snowball Edge.

snowballEdge check-for-updates: Returns version information about the Snowball Edge software available in the cloud, and the current version installed on the device.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge check-for-updates

Example Output

Latest version: 102 Installed version: 101

snowballEdge describe-device-software: Returns the current software version for the device. Additionally, if the update is being downloaded, the download state is also displayed. If a software update is in progress, the version manifest of update, and state of installation is also displayed. Following is a list of possible outputs:

  • NA – No software updates are currently in progress.

  • Downloading – New software is being downloaded.

  • Installing – New software is being installed.

  • Requires Reboot – new software has been installed, and the device needs to be restarted.

    Warning

    We highly recommend that you suspend all activity on the device before you restart the device. Restarting a device stops running instances, interrupts any writing to Amazon S3 buckets on the device, and stops any write operations from the file interface without clearing the cache. All of these processes can result in lost data.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge describe-device-software

Example Output

Installed version: 101 Installing version: 102 Install State: Downloading

snowballEdge download-updates: Starts downloading the latest software updates for your Snowball Edge.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge download-updates

Example Output

Download started. Run describe-device-software API for additional information.

snowballEdge install-updates: Starts installing the latest software updates for your Snowball Edge that were already downloaded.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge install-updates

Example Output

Installation started.

snowballEdge reboot-device: Reboots the device.

Warning

We highly recommend that you suspend all activity on the device before you restart the device. Restarting a device stops running instances, interrupts any writing to Amazon S3 buckets on the device, and stops any write operations from the file interface without clearing the cache. All of these processes can result in lost data.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge reboot-device

Example Output

Rebooting device now.

snowballEdge configure-auto-update-strategies: Configures an automatic update strategy.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge configure-auto-update-strategy --auto-check autoCheck [--auto-check-frequency autoCheckFreq] --auto-download autoDownload [--auto-download-frequency autoDownloadFreq] --auto-install autoInstall [--auto-install-frequency autoInstallFreq] --auto-reboot autoReboot [--endpoint endpoint]

Example Output

Successfully configured auto update strategy. Run describe-auto-update-strategies for additional information.

snowballEdge describe-auto-update-strategies: Returns any currently configured automatic update strategy.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge describe-auto-update-strategies

Example Output

auto-update-strategy {[ auto-check:true, auto-check-frequency: "0 0 * * FRI", // CRON Expression String, Every Friday at midnight auto-download:true, auto-download-frequency: "0 0 * * SAT", // CRON Expression String, Every Saturday at midnight auto-install:true, auto-install-frequency: "0 13 * * Sun", // CRON Expression String, Every Saturday at midnight auto-reboot: false; ]}

Getting Credentials

Using the snowballEdge list-access-keys and snowballEdge get-secret-access-key commands, you can get your local credentials. You use these to authenticate your requests when using the AWS CLI or with an AWS SDK. These credentials are only associated with an individual job for Snowball Edge, and you can use them only on the device or cluster of devices. The device or devices don't have any AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) permissions in the AWS Cloud.

Note

If you're using the AWS CLI with the Snowball Edge, you must use these credentials when you configure the CLI. For information on configuring credentials for the CLI, see Quick Configuration in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge list-access-keys

Example Output

{ "AccessKeyIds" : [ "AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE" ] }

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge get-secret-access-key --access-key-id Access Key

Example Output

[snowballEdge] aws_access_key_id = AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE aws_secret_access_key = wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY

Starting a Service on your Snowball Edge

Snowball Edge devices support multiple services, in addition to Amazon S3. These include compute instances, the file interface, and AWS IoT Greengrass. Amazon S3 and Amazon EC2 are always on by default, and can't be stopped or restarted with the Snowball client. However, the file interface and AWS IoT Greengrass can be started with the snowballEdge start-service command. To get the service ID for each service, you can use the snowballEdge list-services command.

Before you run this command, create a single virtual network interface to bind to the service that you're starting. For more information, see Creating a Virtual Network Interface.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge start-service --service-id service_id --virtual-network-interface-arns virtual-network-interface-arn

Example Output

[snowballEdge] aws_access_key_id = AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE aws_secret_access_key = wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY

Stopping a Service on your Snowball Edge

To stop a service running on your Snowball Edge, you can use the snowballEdge stop-service command. The Amazon S3 and Amazon EC2 services cannot be stopped.

Warning

Data loss can occur if the file interface is stopped before remaining buffered data is written to the device. For more information on using the file interface, see Using the File Interface for the AWS Snowball Edge.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge stop-service --service-id service_id

Example Output

Stopping the AWS service on your Snowball Edge. You can determine the status of the AWS service using the describe-service command.

Getting Your Certificate for Transferring Data

To transfer data to a Snowball Edge, use the Amazon S3 Adapter for Snowball. To use the adapter over the HTTPS protocol, you must provide a certificate. The certificates are generated by each Snowball Edge device. If you unlock your Snowball Edge device with a different IP address, a new certificate is generated and the old certificate is no longer valid to use with the endpoint. You can get the new, updated certificate from the Snowball Edge again using the get-certificate command.

You can list these certificates and download them from your Snowball Edge device with the following commands:

  • list-certificates – Lists the Amazon Resource Names (ARNs) for the certificates available for use.

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge list-certificates

    Example Output

    { "Certificates" : [ { "CertificateArn" : "arn:aws:snowball-device:::certificate/78EXAMPLE516EXAMPLEf538EXAMPLEa7", "SubjectAlternativeNames" : [ "192.0.2.0" ] } ] }
  • get-certificate – Gets a specific certificate, based on the ARN provided.

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge get-certificate --certificate-arn arn:aws:snowball-device:::certificate/78EXAMPLE516EXAMPLEf538EXAMPLEa7

    Example Output

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE----- Certificate -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    For information on configuring your certificate, see Specifying the Adapter as the AWS CLI Endpoint.

AWS Snowball Edge Logs

When you transfer data between your on-premises data center and a Snowball Edge, logs are automatically generated. If you encounter unexpected errors during data transfer to the device, you can use the following commands to save a copy of the logs to your local server.

There are three commands related to logs:

  • list-logs – Returns a list of logs in JSON format. This list reports the size of the logs in bytes, the ARN for the logs, the service ID for the logs, and the type of logs.

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge list-logs

    Example Output

    { "Logs" : [ { "LogArn" : "arn:aws:snowball-device:::log/s3-storage-JIEXAMPLE2f-1234-4953-a7c4-dfEXAMPLE709", "LogType" : "SUPPORT", "ServiceId" : "s3", "EstimatedSizeBytes" : 53132614 }, { "LogArn" : "arn:aws:snowball-device:::log/fileinterface-JIDEXAMPLEf-1234-4953-a7c4-dfEXAMPLE709", "LogType" : "CUSTOMER", "ServiceId" : "fileinterface", "EstimatedSizeBytes" : 4446 }] }
  • get-log – Downloads a copy of a specific log from the Snowball Edge to your server at a specified path. CUSTOMER logs are saved in the .zip format, and you can extract this type of log to view its contents. SUPPORT logs are encrypted and can only be read by AWS Support engineers. You have the option of specifying a name and a path for the log.

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge get-log --log-arn arn:aws:snowball-device:::log/fileinterface-JIDEXAMPLEf-1234-4953-a7c4-dfEXAMPLE709

    Example Output

    Logs are being saved to download/path/snowball-edge-logs-1515EXAMPLE88.bin
  • get-support-logs – Downloads a copy of all the SUPPORT type of logs from the Snowball Edge to your service at a specified path.

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge get-support-logs

    Example Output

    Logs are being saved to download/path/snowball-edge-logs-1515716135711.bin

Important

CUSTOMER type might contain sensitive information about your own data. To protect this potentially sensitive information, we strongly suggest that you delete these logs once you're done with them.

Getting Device Status

You can determine the status and general health of your Snowball Edge devices with the following Snowball client commands:

  • describe-device

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge describe-device

    Example Output

    { "DeviceId" : "JID-EXAMPLE12345-123-456-7-890", "UnlockStatus" : { "State" : "UNLOCKED" }, "ActiveNetworkInterface" : { "IpAddress" : "192.0.2.0" }, "PhysicalNetworkInterfaces" : [ { "PhysicalNetworkInterfaceId" : "s.ni-EXAMPLEd9ecbf03e3", "PhysicalConnectorType" : "RJ45", "IpAddressAssignment" : "STATIC", "IpAddress" : "0.0.0.0", "Netmask" : "0.0.0.0", "DefaultGateway" : "192.0.2.1", "MacAddress" : "EX:AM:PL:E0:12:34" }, { "PhysicalNetworkInterfaceId" : "s.ni-EXAMPLE4c3840068f", "PhysicalConnectorType" : "QSFP", "IpAddressAssignment" : "STATIC", "IpAddress" : "0.0.0.0", "Netmask" : "0.0.0.0", "DefaultGateway" : "192.0.2.2", "MacAddress" : "EX:AM:PL:E0:56:78" }, { "PhysicalNetworkInterfaceId" : "s.ni-EXAMPLE0a3a6499fd", "PhysicalConnectorType" : "SFP_PLUS", "IpAddressAssignment" : "DHCP", "IpAddress" : "192.168.1.231", "Netmask" : "255.255.255.0", "DefaultGateway" : "192.0.2.3", "MacAddress" : "EX:AM:PL:E0:90:12" } ] } }
  • describe-cluster

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge describe-cluster

    Example Output

    { "ClusterId" : "CIDEXAMPLE7-5402-4c19-9feb-7c9EXAMPLEd5", "Devices" : [ { "DeviceId" : "JIDEXAMPLE2-bc53-4618-a538-917EXAMPLE94", "UnlockStatus" : { "State" : "UNLOCKED" }, "ActiveNetworkInterface" : { "IpAddress" : "192.0.2.0" }, "ClusterAssociation" : { "State" : "ASSOCIATED", "ClusterId" : "CIDEXAMPLE7-5402-4c19-9feb-7c9EXAMPLEd5" }, "NetworkReachability" : { "State" : "REACHABLE" } }, { "DeviceId" : "JIDEXAMPLE2-bc53-4618-a538-917EXAMPLE94", "UnlockStatus" : { "State" : "UNLOCKED" }, "ActiveNetworkInterface" : { "IpAddress" : "192.0.2.1" }, "ClusterAssociation" : { "State" : "ASSOCIATED", "ClusterId" : "CIDEXAMPLE7-5402-4c19-9feb-7c9EXAMPLEd5" }, "NetworkReachability" : { "State" : "REACHABLE" } }, { "DeviceId" : "JIDEXAMPLE2-bc53-4618-a538-917EXAMPLE94", "UnlockStatus" : { "State" : "UNLOCKED" }, "ActiveNetworkInterface" : { "IpAddress" : "192.0.2.2" }, "ClusterAssociation" : { "State" : "ASSOCIATED", "ClusterId" : "CIDEXAMPLE7-5402-4c19-9feb-7c9EXAMPLEd5" }, "NetworkReachability" : { "State" : "REACHABLE" } }, { "DeviceId" : "JIDEXAMPLE2-bc53-4618-a538-917EXAMPLE94", "UnlockStatus" : { "State" : "UNLOCKED" }, "ActiveNetworkInterface" : { "IpAddress" : "192.0.2.3" }, "ClusterAssociation" : { "State" : "ASSOCIATED", "ClusterId" : "CIDEXAMPLE7-5402-4c19-9feb-7c9EXAMPLEd5" }, "NetworkReachability" : { "State" : "REACHABLE" } }, { "DeviceId" : "JIDEXAMPLE2-bc53-4618-a538-917EXAMPLE94", "UnlockStatus" : { "State" : "UNLOCKED" }, "ActiveNetworkInterface" : { "IpAddress" : "192.0.2.4" }, "ClusterAssociation" : { "State" : "ASSOCIATED", "ClusterId" : "CIDEXAMPLE7-5402-4c19-9feb-7c9EXAMPLEd5" }, "NetworkReachability" : { "State" : "REACHABLE" } } ] }

Getting Service Status

You can determine the status and general health of the services running on Snowball Edge devices with the describe-service command. You can first run the list-services command to see what services are running.

  • list-services

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge list-services

    Example Output

    { "ServiceIds" : [ “greengrass”, "fileinterface", "s3", "ec2" ] }
  • describe-service

    This command returns a status value for a service. It also includes state information that might be helpful in resolving issues you encounter with the service. Those states are as follows.

    • ACTIVE – The service is running and available for use.

    • ACTIVATING – The service is starting up, but it is not yet available for use.

    • DEACTIVATING – The service is in the process of shutting down.

    • INACTIVE – The service is not running and is not available for use.

    Usage (configured Snowball client)

    snowballEdge describe-service --service-id service-id

    Example Output

    { "ServiceId" : "s3", "Status" : { "State" : "ACTIVE" }, "Storage" : { "TotalSpaceBytes" : 99608745492480, "FreeSpaceBytes" : 99608744468480 }, "Endpoints" : [ { "Protocol" : "http", "Port" : 8080, "Host" : "192.0.2.0" }, { "Protocol" : "https", "Port" : 8443, "Host" : "192.0.2.0", "CertificateAssociation" : { "CertificateArn" : "arn:aws:snowball-device:::certificate/6d955EXAMPLEdb71798146EXAMPLE3f0" } } ] }

Removing a Node from a Cluster

The disassociate-device command removes a node from a Snowball Edge cluster. If you want to replace an unhealthy node, use this command. For more information on clusters, see Using an AWS Snowball Edge Cluster.

Important

Use the disassociate-device command only when you are removing an unhealthy node. This command fails and returns an error if you try to remove a healthy node.

Don't use this command to remove a node that was accidentally powered off or disconnected from the network and is therefore temporarily unavailable to the rest of the cluster. Nodes removed with this command can't be added to any cluster, and must be returned to AWS.

If a node was accidentally powered off or disconnected from the network, simply plug the node back into power, and the network, and use the associate-device command. You can't use the disassociate-device command to disassociate a node if it's powered on and healthy.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge disassociate-device --device-id Job ID for the Device

Example Output

Disassociating your Snowball Edge device from the cluster. Your Snowball Edge device will be disassociated from the cluster when it is in the "DISASSOCIATED" state. You can use the describe-cluster command to determine the state of your cluster.

Adding a Node to a Cluster

The associate-device command adds a node to a cluster of Snowball Edge devices. If you power off a node, then it reverts from being unlocked to being locked. To unlock that node, you can use this command. You can use this command to replace an unavailable node with a new node that you ordered as a replacement. For more information on clusters, see Using an AWS Snowball Edge Cluster.

Usage (configured Snowball client)

snowballEdge associate-device --device-ip-address IP Address

Example Output

Associating your Snowball Edge device with the cluster. Your Snowball Edge device will be associated with the cluster when it is in the ASSOCIATED state. You can use the describe-cluster command to determine the state of your cluster.