Tutorial: Building a private REST API - Amazon API Gateway

Tutorial: Building a private REST API

In this tutorial, you create a private REST API. Clients can access the API only from within your Amazon VPC. The API is isolated from the public internet, which is a common security requirement.

This tutorial takes approximately 30 minutes to complete. First, you use an AWS CloudFormation template to create an Amazon VPC, a VPC endpoint, an AWS Lambda function, and launch an Amazon EC2 instance that you'll use to test your API. Next, you use the AWS Management Console to create a private API and attach a resource policy that allows access only from your VPC endpoint. Lastly, you test your API.


      Architectural overview of the API that you create in this tutorial. Your private API is accessibly only
        from within your Amazon VPC.

To complete this tutorial, you need an AWS account and an AWS Identity and Access Management user with console access. For more information, see Prerequisites for getting started with API Gateway.

In this tutorial, you use the AWS Management Console. For an AWS CloudFormation template that creates this API and all related resources, see template.yaml.

Step 1: Create dependencies

Download and unzip this AWS CloudFormation template. You use the template to create all of the dependencies for your private API, including an Amazon VPC, a VPC endpoint, and a Lambda function that serves as the backend of your API. You create the private API later.

To create an AWS CloudFormation stack
  1. Open the AWS CloudFormation console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/cloudformation.

  2. Choose Create stack and then choose With new resources (standard).

  3. For Specify template, choose Upload a template file.

  4. Select the template that you downloaded.

  5. Choose Next.

  6. For Stack name, enter private-api-tutorial and then choose Next.

  7. For Configure stack options, choose Next.

  8. For Capabilities, acknowledge that AWS CloudFormation can create IAM resources in your account.

  9. Choose Create stack.

AWS CloudFormation provisions the dependencies for your API, which can take a few minutes. When the status of your AWS CloudFormation stack is CREATE_COMPLETE, choose Outputs. Note your VPC endpoint ID. You need it for later steps in this tutorial.

Step 2: Create a private API

You create a private API to allow only clients within your VPC to access it.

To create a private API
  1. Sign in to the API Gateway console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/apigateway.

  2. Choose Create API, and then for REST API, choose Build.

  3. For API name, enter private-api-tutorial.

  4. For API endpoint type, select Private.

  5. For VPC endpoint IDs, enter the VPC endpoint ID from the Outputs of your AWS CloudFormation stack.

  6. Choose Create API.

Step 3: Create a method and integration

You create a GET method and Lambda integration to handle GET requests to your API. When a client invokes your API, API Gateway sends the request to the Lambda function that you created in Step 1, and then returns a response to the client.

To create a method and integration
  1. Sign in to the API Gateway console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/apigateway.

  2. Choose your API.

  3. Select the / resource, and then choose Create method.

  4. For Method type select GET.

  5. For Integration type, select Lambda function.

  6. Turn on Lambda proxy integration. With a Lambda proxy integration, API Gateway sends an event to Lambda with a defined structure, and transforms the response from your Lambda function to an HTTP response.

  7. For Lambda function, choose the function that you created with the AWS CloudFormation template in Step 1. The function's name begins with private-api-tutorial.

  8. Choose Create method.

Step 4: Attach a resource policy

You attach a resource policy to your API that allows clients to invoke your API only through your VPC endpoint. To further restrict access to your API, you can also configure a VPC endpoint policy for your VPC endpoint, but that's not necessary for this tutorial.

To attach a resource policy
  1. Sign in to the API Gateway console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/apigateway.

  2. Choose your API.

  3. Choose Resource policy, and then choose Create policy.

  4. Enter the following policy. Replace vpceID with your VPC endpoint ID from the Outputs of your AWS CloudFormation stack.

    { "Version": "2012-10-17", "Statement": [ { "Effect": "Deny", "Principal": "*", "Action": "execute-api:Invoke", "Resource": "execute-api:/*", "Condition": { "StringNotEquals": { "aws:sourceVpce": "vpceID" } } }, { "Effect": "Allow", "Principal": "*", "Action": "execute-api:Invoke", "Resource": "execute-api:/*" } ] }
  5. Choose Save changes.

Step 5: Deploy your API

Next, you deploy your API to make it available to clients in your Amazon VPC.

To deploy an API
  1. Sign in to the API Gateway console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/apigateway.

  2. Choose your API.

  3. Choose Deploy API.

  4. For Stage, select New stage.

  5. For Stage name, enter test.

  6. (Optional) For Description, enter a description.

  7. Choose Deploy.

Now you're ready to test your API.

Step 6: Verify that your API isn't publicly accessible

Use curl to verify that you can't invoke your API from outside of your Amazon VPC.

To test your API
  1. Sign in to the API Gateway console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/apigateway.

  2. Choose your API.

  3. In the main navigation pane, choose Stages, and then choose the test stage.

  4. Under Stage details, choose the copy icon to copy your API's invoke URL. The URL looks like https://abcdef123.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/test. The VPC endpoint that you created in Step 1 has private DNS enabled, so you can use the provided URL to invoke your API.

  5. Use curl to attempt to invoke your API from outside of your VPC.

    curl https://abcdef123.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/test

    Curl indicates that your API's endpoint can't be resolved. If you get a different response, go back to Step 2, and make sure that you choose Private for your API's endpoint type.

    curl: (6) Could not resolve host: abcdef123.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/test

Next, you connect to an Amazon EC2 instance in your VPC to invoke your API.

Step 7: Connect to an instance in your VPC and invoke your API

Next, you test your API from within your Amazon VPC. To access your private API, you connect to an Amazon EC2 instance in your VPC and then use curl to invoke your API. You use Systems Manager Session Manager to connect to your instance in the browser.

To test your API
  1. Open the Amazon EC2 console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/ec2/.

  2. Choose Instances.

  3. Choose the instance named private-api-tutorial that you created with the AWS CloudFormation template in Step 1.

  4. Choose Connect and then choose Session Manager.

  5. Choose Connect to launch a browser-based session to your instance.

  6. In your Session Manager session, use curl to invoke your API. You can invoke your API because you're using an instance in your Amazon VPC.

    curl https://abcdef123.execute-api.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/test

    Verify that you get the response Hello from Lambda!.


        You use Session Manager to invoke your API from within your Amazon VPC.

You successfully created an API that's accessible only from within your Amazon VPC and then verified that it works.

Step 8: Clean up

To prevent unnecessary costs, delete the resources that you created as part of this tutorial. The following steps delete your REST API and your AWS CloudFormation stack.

To delete a REST API
  1. Sign in to the API Gateway console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/apigateway.

  2. On the APIs page, select an API. Choose API actions, choose Delete API, and then confirm your choice.

To delete an AWS CloudFormation stack
  1. Open the AWS CloudFormation console at https://console.aws.amazon.com/cloudformation.

  2. Select your AWS CloudFormation stack.

  3. Choose Delete and then confirm your choice.

Next steps: Automate with AWS CloudFormation

You can automate the creation and cleanup of all AWS resources involved in this tutorial. For a full example AWS CloudFormation template, see template.yaml.