Amazon Neptune
User Guide (API Version 2017-11-29)

The AWS Documentation website is getting a new look!
Try it now and let us know what you think. Switch to the new look >>

You can return to the original look by selecting English in the language selector above.

Connecting and Signing with AWS Signature Version 4

Amazon Neptune resources that have IAM DB authentication enabled require all HTTP requests to be signed using AWS Signature Version 4. For general information about signing requests with AWS Signature Version 4, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process.

AWS Signature Version 4 is the process to add authentication information to AWS requests. For security, most requests to AWS must be signed with an access key, which consists of an access key ID and secret access key.

Note

If you are using temporary credentials, they expire after a specified interval, including the session token.

You must update your session token when you request new credentials. For more information, see Using Temporary Security Credentials to Request Access to AWS Resources.

Important

Accessing Neptune with IAM-based authentication requires that you create HTTP requests and sign the requests yourself.

How Signature Version 4 Works

  1. You create a canonical request.

  2. You use the canonical request and some other information to create a string-to-sign.

  3. You use your AWS secret access key to derive a signing key, and then use that signing key and the string-to-sign to create a signature.

  4. You add the resulting signature to the HTTP request in a header or as a query string parameter.

When Neptune receives the request, it performs the same steps that you did to calculate the signature. Neptune then compares the calculated signature to the one you sent with the request. If the signatures match, the request is processed. If the signatures don't match, the request is denied.

For general information about signing requests with AWS Signature Version 4, see Signature Version 4 Signing Process in the AWS General Reference.

The following sections contain examples that show how to send signed requests to the Gremlin and SPARQL endpoints of a Neptune DB instance with IAM authentication enabled.