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Elastic Load Balancing
Classic Load Balancers

Access Logs for Your Classic Load Balancer

Elastic Load Balancing provides access logs that capture detailed information about requests sent to your load balancer. Each log contains information such as the time the request was received, the client's IP address, latencies, request paths, and server responses. You can use these access logs to analyze traffic patterns and to troubleshoot issues.

Access logging is an optional feature of Elastic Load Balancing that is disabled by default. After you enable access logging for your load balancer, Elastic Load Balancing captures the logs and stores them in the Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. You can disable access logging at any time.

There is no additional charge for access logs. You will be charged storage costs for Amazon S3, but will not be charged for the bandwidth used by Elastic Load Balancing to send log files to Amazon S3. For more information about storage costs, see Amazon S3 Pricing.

Access Log Files

Elastic Load Balancing publishes a log file for each load balancer node at the interval you specify. You can specify a publishing interval of either 5 minutes or 60 minutes when you enable the access log for your load balancer. By default, Elastic Load Balancing publishes logs at a 60-minute interval. If the interval is set for 5 minutes, the logs are published at 1:05, 1:10, 1:15, and so on. The start of log delivery is delayed up to 5 minutes if the interval is set to 5 minutes, and up to 15 minutes if the interval is set to 60 minutes. You can modify the publishing interval at any time.

The load balancer can deliver multiple logs for the same period. This usually happens if the site has high traffic, multiple load balancer nodes, and a short log publishing interval.

The file names of the access logs use the following format:

bucket[/prefix]/AWSLogs/aws-account-id/elasticloadbalancing/region/yyyy/mm/dd/aws-account-id_elasticloadbalancing_region_load-balancer-name_end-time_ip-address_random-string.log
bucket

The name of the S3 bucket.

prefix

The prefix (logical hierarchy) in the bucket. If you don't specify a prefix, the logs are placed at the root level of the bucket.

aws-account-id

The AWS account ID of the owner.

region

The region for your load balancer and S3 bucket.

yyyy/mm/dd

The date that the log was delivered.

load-balancer-name

The name of the load balancer.

end-time

The date and time that the logging interval ended. For example, an end time of 20140215T2340Z contains entries for requests made between 23:35 and 23:40 if the publishing interval is 5 minutes.

ip-address

The IP address of the load balancer node that handled the request. For an internal load balancer, this is a private IP address.

random-string

A system-generated random string.

The following is an example log file name:

s3://my-loadbalancer-logs/my-app/AWSLogs/123456789012/elasticloadbalancing/us-west-2/2014/02/15/123456789012_elasticloadbalancing_us-west-2_my-loadbalancer_20140215T2340Z_172.160.001.192_20sg8hgm.log

You can store your log files in your bucket for as long as you want, but you can also define Amazon S3 lifecycle rules to archive or delete log files automatically. For more information, see Object Lifecycle Management in the Amazon Simple Storage Service Developer Guide.

Access Log Entries

Elastic Load Balancing logs requests sent to the load balancer, including requests that never made it to the back-end instances. For example, if a client sends a malformed request, or there are no healthy instances to respond, the requests are still logged.

Important

Elastic Load Balancing logs requests on a best-effort basis. We recommend that you use access logs to understand the nature of the requests, not as a complete accounting of all requests.

Syntax

Each log entry contains the details of a single request made to the load balancer. All fields in the log entry are delimited by spaces. Each entry in the log file has the following format:

timestamp elb client:port backend:port request_processing_time backend_processing_time response_processing_time elb_status_code backend_status_code received_bytes sent_bytes "request" "user_agent" ssl_cipher ssl_protocol

The following table describes the fields of an access log entry.

FieldDescription

timestamp

The time when the load balancer received the request from the client, in ISO 8601 format.

elb

The name of the load balancer

client:port

The IP address and port of the requesting client.

backend:port

The IP address and port of the registered instance that processed this request.

If the client didn't send a full request, the load balancer can't dispatch the request to a registered instance, and this value is set to -.

request_processing_time

[HTTP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, from the time the load balancer received the request until the time it sent it to a registered instance.

[TCP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, from the time the load balancer accepted a TCP/SSL connection from a client to the time the load balancer sends the first byte of data to a registered instance.

This value is set to -1 if the load balancer can't dispatch the request to a registered instance. This can happen if the registered instance closes the connection before the idle timeout or if the client sends a malformed request. Additionally, for TCP listeners, this can happen if the client establishes a connection with the load balancer but does not send any data.

backend_processing_time

[HTTP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, from the time the load balancer sent the request to a registered instance until the instance started to send the response headers.

[TCP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, for the load balancer to successfully establish a connection to a registered instance.

This value is set to -1 if the load balancer can't dispatch the request to a registered instance. This can happen if the registered instance closes the connection before the idle timeout or if the client sends a malformed request.

response_processing_time

[HTTP listener] The total time elapsed (in seconds) from the time the load balancer received the response header from the registered instance until it started to send the response to the client. This includes both the queuing time at the load balancer and the connection acquisition time from the load balancer to the back end.

[TCP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, from the time the load balancer received the first byte from the registered instance until it started to send the response to the client.

This value is set to -1 if the load balancer can't dispatch the request to a registered instance. This can happen if the registered instance closes the connection before the idle timeout or if the client sends a malformed request.

elb_status_code

[HTTP listener] The status code of the response from the load balancer.

backend_status_code

[HTTP listener] The status code of the response from the registered instance.

received_bytes

The size of the request, in bytes, received from the client (requester).

[HTTP listener] The value includes the request body but not the headers.

[TCP listener] The value includes the request body and the headers.

sent_bytes

The size of the response, in bytes, sent to the client (requester).

[HTTP listener] The value includes the response body but not the headers.

[TCP listener] The value includes the request body and the headers.

request

The request line from the client enclosed in double quotes and logged in the following format: HTTP Method + Protocol://Host header:port + Path + HTTP version.

[TCP listener] The URL is three dashes, each separated by a space, and ending with a space ("- - - ").

user_agent

[HTTP/HTTPS listener] A User-Agent string that identifies the client that originated the request. The string consists of one or more product identifiers, product[/version]. If the string is longer than 8 KB, it is truncated.

ssl_cipher

[HTTPS/SSL listener] The SSL cipher. This value is recorded only if the incoming SSL/TLS connection was established after a successful negotiation. Otherwise, the value is set to -.

ssl_protocol

[HTTPS/SSL listener] The SSL protocol. This value is recorded only if the incoming SSL/TLS connection was established after a successful negotiation. Otherwise, the value is set to -.

Examples

Example HTTP Entry

The following is an example log entry for an HTTP listener (port 80 to port 80):

2015-05-13T23:39:43.945958Z my-loadbalancer 192.168.131.39:2817 10.0.0.1:80 0.000073 0.001048 0.000057 200 200 0 29 "GET http://www.example.com:80/ HTTP/1.1" "curl/7.38.0" - -

Example HTTPS Entry

The following is an example log entry for an HTTPS listener (port 443 to port 80):

2015-05-13T23:39:43.945958Z my-loadbalancer 192.168.131.39:2817 10.0.0.1:80 0.000086 0.001048 0.001337 200 200 0 57 "GET https://www.example.com:443/ HTTP/1.1" "curl/7.38.0" DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA TLSv1.2

Example TCP Entry

The following is an example log entry for an TCP listener (port 8080 to port 80):

2015-05-13T23:39:43.945958Z my-loadbalancer 192.168.131.39:2817 10.0.0.1:80 0.001069 0.000028 0.000041 - - 82 305 "- - - " "-" - -

Example SSL Entry

The following is an example log entry for an SSL listener (port 8443 to port 80):

2015-05-13T23:39:43.945958Z my-loadbalancer 192.168.131.39:2817 10.0.0.1:80 0.001065 0.000015 0.000023 - - 57 502 "- - - " "-" ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 TLSv1.2

Processing Access Logs

If there is a lot of demand on your website, your load balancer can generate log files with gigabytes of data. You might not be able to process such a large amount of data using line-by-line processing. Therefore, you might have to use analytical tools that provide parallel processing solutions. For example, you can use the following analytical tools to analyze and process access logs: