Amazon MQ release notes - Amazon MQ

Amazon MQ release notes

The following table lists Amazon MQ feature releases and improvements. For changes to the Amazon MQ Developer Guide, see Amazon MQ Document History.

Date Documentation Update
May 10, 2024

The Amazon MQ version support calendar indicates when a broker engine version reaches end of support. When an engine version reaches end of support, Amazon MQ updates all brokers on the version to the next supported minor version automatically. Amazon MQ provides at least a 90 day notice before an engine version reaches end of support.

To view the version support calendar and end of support, see the following:

You can also enable automatic minor version upgrades for your broker to update to the next patch version during a maintenance window. For more information, see Upgrading an Amazon MQ broker engine version

May 9, 2024

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ 3.12, a minor version release. All brokers on 3.12.13 and above use Classic Queues version 2 (CQv2), and all queues on 3.12.13 and above behave as lazy queues.

We recommend brokers on versions prior to 3.12.13 enable CQv2 and lazy queues, or upgrade to the newest version of Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

March 4, 2024

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ 3.11.28.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

January 19, 2024

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ does not support the username "guest", and will delete the default guest account when you create a new broker. Amazon MQ will also periodically delete any customer created account called "guest".

December 15, 2023

Amazon MQ is now available in the Israel (Tel Aviv) Region. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints in the AWS General Reference guide.

December 11, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ 3.10.25.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

October 26, 2023

Amazon MQ has released the latest ActiveMQ minor versions 5.15.16, 5.16.7, 5.17.6 with a critical update. We have deprecated the older minor versions of ActiveMQ and will be updating all brokers on any version of 5.15 to 5.15.16, or 5.16 to 5.16.7 and 5.17 to 5.17.6.

For more information on updating your ActiveMQ broker, see Managing Amazon MQ for ActiveMQ engine versions.

September 27, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ 3.11.20.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

July 27, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ 3.11.16

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

July 27, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports creating and applying configurations to your RabbitMQ broker.

For more information on adding confgurations to your broker, see RabbitMQ Broker Configurations.

For more information about this feature, see:

June 23, 2023

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.17.3, a new minor engine version release. This release supports the new cross-Region data replication (CRDR) feature from Amazon MQ.

For more information, see the following:

June 21, 2023

Amazon MQ for ActiveMQ now offers a cross-Region data replication (CRDR) feature that allows for asynchronous message replication from the primary broker in a primary AWS Region to the replica broker in a replica Region. If the primary broker in the primary Region fails, you can promote the replica broker in the secondary Region to primary by initiating a switchover or failover.

To get started with CRDR, see Cross-Region data replication for Amazon MQ for ActiveMQ in the Developer Guide.

May 18, 2023

Amazon MQ is now available in the following regions:

  • Asia Pacific (Melbourne)

  • Asia Pacific (Hyderabad)

  • Europe (Spain)

  • Europe (Zurich)

For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints in the AWS General Reference guide.

April 14, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.9.27.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

April 14, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.10.20.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

March 31, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ has disabled RabbitMQ engine version 3.10.17

The Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ team, and the open source maintainers of RabbitMQ, have identified an issue with the RabbitMQ management console on version 3.10.17. Amazon MQ has retracted this version. To mitigate the impacts of this issue, create new brokers with version 3.10.20 while we work to support a new patch version of RabbitMQ. We recommend activating the auto minor version upgrade option to automatically get the latest bug fixes, security updates and performance enhancements.

For more information on available Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions, see Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

March 1, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.10.17.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

February 21, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now integrates with AWS Key Management Service (KMS) to offer server-side encryption. You can now select your own customer managed CMK, or use an AWS managed KMS key in your AWS KMS account. For more information, see Encryption at rest.

Amazon MQ supports using AWS KMS keys in the following ways.

  • Amazon MQ owned KMS key (default) — The key is owned and managed by Amazon MQ and is not in your account.

  • AWS managed KMS key — The AWS managed KMS key (aws/mq) is a KMS key in your account that is created, managed, and used on your behalf by Amazon MQ.

  • Select existing customer managed KMS key — Customer managed KMS keys are created and managed by you in AWS Key Management Service (KMS).

January 13, 2023

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.8.34.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

December 15, 2022

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.9.24.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

December 13, 2022

Amazon MQ is now available in the Middle East (UAE) Region. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints in the AWS General Reference guide.

November 14, 2022

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports 3.10, a major engine version release. You can now enable classic Queues version 2 (CQv2) on your RabbitMQ queues. Direct updates from 3.8 to 3.10 are not supported. For more information, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

November 9, 2022

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.17.2, a new minor engine version release. For more information, see the following:

August 17, 2022

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.17.1, a new major engine version release. For more information, see the following:

July 14, 2022

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.16.5, a minor engine version release. For more information, see the following:

May 4, 2022

Amazon MQ adds inclusive language for networkConnector element in broker configuration.

April 25, 2022

Amazon MQ This release adds the CRITICAL_ACTION_REQUIRED broker state and the ActionRequired API property. CRITICAL_ACTION_REQUIRED informs you when your broker is degraded. ActionRequired provides you with a code which you can use to find instructions in the Developer Guide on how to resolve the issue.

April 20, 2022

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.16.4, a minor engine version release. For more information, see the following:

March 1, 2022

Amazon MQ is now available in the Asia Pacific (Jakarta) Region. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints in the AWS General Reference guide.

February 25, 2022

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.8.27.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

February 16, 2022

Amazon MQ is now available in the Africa (Cape Town) Region. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints in the AWS General Reference guide.

February 14, 2022

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.9.13. Automatic minor version upgrades cannot be used to upgrade from Rabbit 3.8 to 3.9. To do so, manually upgrade your broker.

For more information on new features introduced in RabbitMQ 3.9, see the release notes page for version 3.9.0 on the GitHub website.

Note

Currently, Amazon MQ does not support streams, or using structured logging in JSON, introduced in RabbitMQ 3.9.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

February 07, 2022

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ introduces new broker metrics, allowing you to monitor average resource utilization across all three nodes in a cluster deployment.

For more information, see the following:

January 18, 2022

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.8.26.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

January 13, 2022

Amazon MQ introduces the RABBITMQ_MEMORY_ALARM status code to inform you when your broker has raised a high memory alarm and is in an unhealthy state. Amazon MQ provides detailed information and recommendations to help you diagnose, resolve and prevent high memory alarms. For more information, see the following.

January 6, 2022

When you configure CloudWatch Logs for Amazon MQ for ActiveMQ brokers, Amazon MQ supports using the aws:SourceArn and aws:SourceAccount global condition context keys in IAM resource-based policies to prevent the confused deputy problem. For more information, see the following.

December 20, 2021

Amazon MQ for ActiveMQ introduces a set of new metrics, allowing you to monitor the maximum number of connections you can make to your broker using different supported transport protocols, as well as an additional new metric that allows you to monitor the number of nodes connected to your broker in a network of brokers. For more information, see the following.

November 16, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.8.23.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions.

October 12, 2021

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.16.3, a minor engine version release. For more information, see the following:

September 8, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.8.22.

This release includes a fix for an issue with queues using per-message TTL (time to live), identified in the previously supported version, RabbitMQ 3.8.17. We recommend upgrading your existing brokers to version 3.8.22.

For more information about the fixes and features in this release, see the following:

For more information about supported Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ versions and broker upgrades, see Managing Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ engine versions

August 25, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ has temporarily disabled RabbitMQ engine version 3.8.17 due to an issue identified with queues using per-message time-to-live (TTL). We recommend using version 3.8.11.

July 29, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ now supports RabbitMQ version 3.8.17. For more information about the fixes and features contained in this update, see the following:

July 16, 2021

You can now adjust the maintenance window of an Amazon MQ broker using the AWS Management Console, AWS CLI, or the Amazon MQ API. To learn more about broker maintenance windows, see the following.

July 6, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ introduces support for the Consistent Hash exchange type. Consistent Hash exchanges route messages to queues based on a hash value calculated from the routing key of a message. For more information, see the following:

June 7, 2021

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.16.2, a new major engine version release. For more information, see the following:

May 26, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ is now available in the China (Beijing) and China (Ningxia) Regions. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints.

May 18, 2021

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ implements broker defaults.

When you first create a broker, Amazon MQ creates a set of broker policies and vhost limits based on the instance type and deployment mode you choose, in order to optimize the broker's performance. For more information, see the following:

May 5, 2021

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.15.15. For more information, see the following:

May 5, 2021

Amazon MQ started tracking changes to AWS managed policies. For more information, see the following:

April 14, 2021

Amazon MQ is now available in the China (Beijing) and China (Ningxia) Regions. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints.

April 7, 2021

Amazon MQ now supports RabbitMQ 3.8.11. For more information about the fixes and features contained in this update, see the following:

April 1, 2021

Amazon MQ is now available in the Asia Pacific (Osaka) Region. For information about available regions, see Amazon MQ regions and endpoints.

December 21, 2020

Amazon MQ now supports ActiveMQ 5.15.14. For more information, see the following:

November 4, 2020

Amazon MQ now supports RabbitMQ, a popular open source message broker. This enables you to migrate your existing RabbitMQ message brokers to AWS without having to rewrite code.

Amazon MQ for RabbitMQ manages both individual and clustered message brokers and handles tasks like provisioning the infrastructure, setting up the broker, and updating the software.

To get started with using Amazon MQ, create a broker, and connect a JVM-based application to your RabbitMQ broker, see Creating and connecting to a RabbitMQ broker.

October 22, 2020

Amazon MQ supports ActiveMQ 5.15.13. For more information, see the following:

September 30, 2020

Amazon MQ is now available in the Europe (Milan) Region. For information about available regions, see Amazon MQ regions and endpoints.

July 27, 2020

You can authenticate Amazon MQ users using the credentials stored in your Active Directory or other LDAP server. You can also add, delete, and modify Amazon MQ users and assign permissions to topics and queues. For more information, see Integrate LDAP with ActiveMQ.

July 17, 2020

Amazon MQ now supports the mq.t3.micro instance type. For more information, see Broker instance types.

June 30, 2020

Amazon MQ supports ActiveMQ 5.15.12. For more information, see the following:

April 30, 2020

Amazon MQ supports a new child collection element, systemUsage, on the broker element. For more information, see systemUsage.

Amazon MQ also supports three new attributes on the kahaDB child element.

  • journalDiskSyncInterval - Interval (ms) for when to perform a disk sync if journalDiskSyncStrategy=periodic.

  • journalDiskSyncStrategy - configures the disk sync policy.

  • preallocationStrategy - configures how the broker will try to preallocate the journal files when a new journal file is needed.

For more information, see Attributes.

March 3, 2020

Amazon MQ supports two new CloudWatch metrics

  • TempPercentUsage - The percentage of available temporary storage used by non-persistent messages.

  • JobSchedulerStorePercentUsage - The percentage of disk space used by the job scheduler store.

For more information, see Monitoring Amazon MQ using CloudWatch.

February 4, 2020 Amazon MQ is available in the Asia Pacific (Hong Kong) and Middle East (Bahrain) regions. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints.
January 22, 2020

Amazon MQ supports ActiveMQ 5.15.10. For more information, see the following:

December 19, 2019 Amazon MQ is available in the Europe (Stockholm) and South America (São Paulo) regions. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints.
December 16, 2019 Amazon MQ supports creating throughput-optimized brokers by using Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS)—instead of the default Amazon Elastic File System (Amazon EFS)—for broker storage. To take advantage of high durability and replication across multiple Availability Zones, use Amazon EFS. To take advantage of low latency and high throughput, use Amazon EBS.
Important
  • You can use Amazon EBS only with the mq.m5 broker instance type family.

  • Although you can change the broker instance type, you can't change the broker storage type after you create the broker.

  • Amazon EBS replicates data within a single Availability Zone and doesn't support the ActiveMQ active/standby deployment mode.

For more information, see the following:
October 18, 2019

Two Amazon CloudWatch metrics are available: TotalEnqueueCount and TotalDequeueCount. For more information, see ActiveMQ destination (queue and topic) metrics.

October 11, 2019

Amazon MQ now supports Federal Information Processing Standard 140-2 (FIPS) compliant endpoints in U.S. commercial regions.

For more information see the following:

September 30, 2019

Amazon MQ now includes the ability to scale your brokers by changing the host instance type. For more information, see the hostInstanceType property of UpdateBrokerInput, and the pendingHostInstanceType property of DescribeBrokerOutput.

August 30, 2019

You can now update the security groups associated with a broker, both in the console and with UpdateBrokerInput.

July 22, 2019

Amazon MQ integrates with AWS Key Management Service (KMS) to offer server-side encryption. You can now select your own customer managed CMK, or use an AWS managed KMS key in your AWS KMS account. For more information, see Encryption at rest.

Amazon MQ supports using AWS KMS keys in the following ways.

  • AWS owned KMS key — The key is owned Amazon MQ and is not in your account.

  • AWS managed KMS key — The AWS managed KMS key (aws/mq) is a KMS key in your account that is created, managed, and used on your behalf by Amazon MQ.

  • Select existing customer managed CMK — Customer managed CMKs are created and managed by you in AWS Key Management Service (KMS).

June 19, 2019 Amazon MQ is available in the Europe (Paris) and Asia Pacific (Mumbai) regions. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints.
June 12, 2019 Amazon MQ is available in the Canada (Central) region. For information on available regions, see AWS Regions and Endpoints.
June 3, 2019

Two new Amazon CloudWatch metrics are available: EstablishedConnectionsCount and InactiveDurableSubscribers. For more information, see the following:

May 10, 2019

Data storage for new mq.t2.micro instance types is limited to 20 GB. For more information, see the following:

April 29, 2019

You can now use tag-based policies and resource-level permissions. For more information, see the following:

April 16, 2019

You can now retrieve information about broker engine and broker instance options using the REST API. For more information, see the following:

April 8, 2019

Amazon MQ supports ActiveMQ 5.15.9. For more information, see the following:

March 4, 2019 Improved the documentation for configuring dynamic failover and the rebalancing of clients for a network of brokers. Enable dynamic failover by configuring transportConnectors along with networkConnectors configuration options. For more information, see the following:
February 27, 2019 Amazon MQ is available in the Europe (London) Region in addition to the following regions:
  • Asia Pacific (Singapore)

  • US East (Ohio)

  • US East (N. Virginia)

  • US West (N. California)

  • US West (Oregon)

  • Asia Pacific (Tokyo)

  • Asia Pacific (Seoul)

  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)

  • Europe (Frankfurt)

  • Europe (Ireland)

January 24, 2019

The default configuration now includes a policy to purge inactive destinations.

January 17, 2019

Amazon MQ mq.t2.micro instance types now support only 100 connections per wire-level protocol. For more information, see, Quotas in Amazon MQ.

December 19, 2018 You can configure a series of Amazon MQ brokers in a network of brokers. For more information, see the following sections:
December 11, 2018 Amazon MQ supports ActiveMQ 5.15.8, 5.15.6, and 5.15.0.
December 5, 2018 AWS supports resource tagging to help track your cost allocation. You can tag resources when creating them, or by viewing the details of that resource. For more information, see Tagging resources.
November 19, 2018 AWS has expanded its SOC compliance program to include Amazon MQ as an SOC compliant service.
October 15, 2018
  • The maximum number of groups per user is 20. For more information, see Users.

  • The maximum number of connections per broker, per wire-level protocol is 1,000. For more information, see Brokers.

October 2, 2018 AWS has expanded its HIPAA compliance program to include Amazon MQ as a HIPAA Eligible Service.
September 27, 2018 Amazon MQ supports ActiveMQ 5.15.6, in addition to 5.15.0. For more information, see the following:
August 31, 2018
  • The following metrics are available:

    • CurrentConnectionsCount

    • TotalConsumerCount

    • TotalProducerCount

    For more information, see the Amazon MQ for ActiveMQ metrics section.

  • The IP address of the broker is displayed on the Details page.

    Note

    For brokers with public accessibility disabled, the internal IP address is displayed.

August 30, 2018 Amazon MQ is available in the Asia Pacific (Singapore) Region in addition to the following regions:
  • US East (Ohio)

  • US East (N. Virginia)

  • US West (N. California)

  • US West (Oregon)

  • Asia Pacific (Tokyo)

  • Asia Pacific (Seoul)

  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)

  • Europe (Frankfurt)

  • Europe (Ireland)

July 30, 2018 You can configure Amazon MQ to publish general and audit logs to Amazon CloudWatch Logs. For more information, see Configuring Amazon MQ to publish logs to Amazon CloudWatch Logs.
July 25, 2018 Amazon MQ is available in the Asia Pacific (Tokyo) and Asia Pacific (Seoul) Regions in addition to the following regions:
  • US East (Ohio)

  • US East (N. Virginia)

  • US West (N. California)

  • US West (Oregon)

  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)

  • Europe (Frankfurt)

  • Europe (Ireland)

July 19, 2018 You can use AWS CloudTrail to log Amazon MQ API calls. For more information, see Logging Amazon MQ API calls using CloudTrail.
June 29, 2018 In addition to mq.t2.micro and mq.m4.large, the following broker instance types are available for regular development, testing, and production workloads that require high throughput:
  • mq.m5.large

  • mq.m5.xlarge

  • mq.m5.2xlarge

  • mq.m5.4xlarge

For more information, see Broker instance types.

June 27, 2018 Amazon MQ is available in the US West (N. California) Region in addition to the following regions:
  • US East (Ohio)

  • US East (N. Virginia)

  • US West (Oregon)

  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)

  • Europe (Frankfurt)

  • Europe (Ireland)

June 14, 2018
  • You can use the AWS::Amazon MQ::Broker AWS CloudFormation resource to perform the following actions:

    • Create a broker.

    • Add configuration changes or modify users for the specified broker.

    • Return information about the specified broker.

    • Delete the specified broker.

    Note

    When you change any property of the Amazon MQ Broker ConfigurationId or Amazon MQ Broker User property type, the broker is rebooted immediately.

  • You can use the AWS::Amazon MQ::Configuration AWS CloudFormation resource to perform the following actions:

    • Create a configuration.

    • Update the specified configuration.

    • Return information about the specified configuration.

    Note

    You can use AWS CloudFormation to modify—but not delete—an Amazon MQ configuration.

June 7, 2018 The Amazon MQ console supports German, Brazilian Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and Traditional Chinese.
May 17, 2018 The limit of number of users per broker is 250. For more information, see Users.
March 13, 2018 Creating a broker takes about 15 minutes. For more information, see Finish creating the broker.
March 1, 2018
January 10, 2018

The following changes affect the Amazon MQ console:

  • In the broker list, the Creation column is hidden by default. To customize the page size and columns, choose .

  • On the MyBroker page, in the Connections section, choosing the name of your security group or opens the EC2 console (instead of the VPC console). The EC2 console allows more intuitive configuration of inbound and outbound rules. For more information, see the updated Enable inbound connections section.

January 9, 2018
  • The permission for REST operation ID UpdateBroker is listed correctly as mq:UpdateBroker on the IAM console.

  • The erroneous mq:DescribeEngine permission is removed from the IAM console.

November 28, 2017 This is the initial release of Amazon MQ and the Amazon MQ Developer Guide.
  • Amazon MQ is avaialble in the following regions:

    • US East (Ohio)

    • US East (N. Virginia)

    • US West (Oregon)

    • Asia Pacific (Sydney)

    • Europe (Frankfurt)

    • Europe (Ireland)

    Using the mq.t2.micro instance type is subject to CPU credits and baseline performance—with the ability to burst above the baseline level (for more information, see the CpuCreditBalance metric). If your application requires fixed performance, consider using an mq.m5.large instance type.

  • You can create mq.m4.large and mq.t2.micro brokers.

    Using the mq.t2.micro instance type is subject to CPU credits and baseline performance—with the ability to burst above the baseline level (for more information, see the CpuCreditBalance metric). If your application requires fixed performance, consider using an mq.m5.large instance type.

  • You can use the ActiveMQ 5.15.0 broker engine.

  • You can also create and manage brokers programmatically using Amazon MQ REST API and AWS SDKs.

  • You can access your brokers by using any programming language that ActiveMQ supports and by enabling TLS explicitly for the following protocols:

  • You can connect to ActiveMQ brokers using various ActiveMQ clients. We recommend using the ActiveMQ Client. For more information, see Connecting a Java application to your broker.

  • Your broker can send and receive messages of any size.