Common Contact Control Panel (CCP) Issues - Amazon Connect

Common Contact Control Panel (CCP) Issues

The following are common issues encountered when using the Amazon Connect CCP.

  • CCP does not initialize/connect—The most common causes are missing port/IP allowlist entries, not allowing browser microphone access, or not answering your external device. Be sure that you have added to the allowlist all IPs covered in the Set up your network section of this guide, and that you have allowed microphone access to your browser when prompted.

  • Session expired message upon initial log in

    If you see the Session expired message while logging in, you probably just need to refresh the session token. Go to your identity provider and log in. Refresh the Amazon Connect page. If you still get this message, contact your IT team.

  • Periodic connection errors—The most common cause is network contention, or there may have been an ipranges.json update and the new entries have not been added to the allowlist. For more information, see the Set up your network section of this guide.

  • Missed calls, state change delays, and CCP unresponsive—In most cases, this is intermittent and directly correlated with resource contention in the agent's workstation, network, or both. This can be made worse, or caused directly, by a poor, unstable, or strained connection to AWS resources at the private WAN/LAN, public WAN levels, or local workstation resource contention.

The following are common issues with call quality when using the CCP. Call quality encompasses a large range of potential causes and is best approached by first identifying the types of issues that you're having.

  • Latency/cross-talk—in a voice connection manifests as a delay between when something is said and when the person on the other end hears it. In some use cases that require a lot of conversation, high latency can create situations in which both parties are talking over each other. The PSTN (public switched telephone network) and agent latency need to be calculated in this scenario to identify contributing factors and take action to reduce PSTN latency, agent latency, or both. For more information, see the PSTN and agent connection latency section of this documentation.

  • One way audio—is when the agent can't hear the caller or the caller can't hear them. This is normally indicative of an issue with the agent's workstation at the hardware, network, resource levels, or all three. It and can also be related to browser microphone permissions or headset issues. For more information, see the How to determine whether a workstation is the source of problems section of this guide.

  • Volume increase or decrease— can happen at the beginning or intermittently during the call, and it's important to differentiate the two for troubleshooting purposes. Typically, this relates to forwarding calls to or from Amazon Connect that inherit this from an issue with the third party transfer.

  • Audio choppy, cutting out, echo, reverb, or other signal noise—could also manifest as a robotic sound or other distortion making it difficult for either the agent, caller, or both parties to understand what’s being said. This is normally indicative of an issue with the agent's workstation at the hardware, network, resource levels, or all three. For more information, see the How to determine whether a workstation is the source of problems section of this guide.

  • Wobble—is the effect that media codecs can have on audio that manifests as the slowing down and speeding up of audio to combat high jitter and latency. This is normally indicative of an issue with the agent's workstation at the hardware, network, resource levels, or all three. For more information, see the How to determine whether a workstation is the source of problems section of this guide.

  • Disconnects—can happen at any point in the call. It is important to note when during the call that the disconnections occur to identify a pattern. For example, disconnects on call transfers to a specific external number typically relate to forwarding calls to or from Amazon Connect that inherit this from an issue with the third party transfer. They can also be related to circular transfers, which means transferring calls out of Amazon Connect and back in the same call.