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Elastic Load Balancing Metrics and Dimensions

Elastic Load Balancing supports two types of load balancers: Classic Load Balancers and Application Load Balancers. Elastic Load Balancing sends metrics to CloudWatch for both types of load balancers.

Application Load Balancer Metrics

The AWS/ApplicationELB namespace includes the following metrics.

Metric Description
ActiveConnectionCount

The total number of concurrent TCP connections active from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

ClientTLSNegotiationErrorCount

The number of TLS connections initiated by the client that did not establish a session with the load balancer. Possible causes include a mismatch of ciphers or protocols.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

ConsumedLCUs

The number of load balancer capacity units (LCU) used by your load balancer. You pay for the number of LCUs that you use per hour. For more information, see LCU Details.

HealthyHostCount

The number of targets that are considered healthy.

Statistics: The most useful statistics are Average, Minimum, and Maximum.

HTTPCode_ELB_4XX_Count

The number of HTTP 4XX client error codes that originate from the load balancer. Client errors are generated when requests are malformed or incomplete. These requests have not been received by the target. This count does not include any response codes generated by the targets.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average all return 1.

HTTPCode_ELB_5XX_Count

The number of HTTP 5XX server error codes that originate from the load balancer. This count does not include any response codes generated by the targets.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average all return 1.

HTTPCode_Target_2XX_Count, HTTPCode_Target_3XX_Count, HTTPCode_Target_4XX_Count, HTTPCode_Target_5XX_Count

The number of HTTP response codes generated by the targets. This does not include any response codes generated by the load balancer.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average all return 1.

IPv6ProcessedBytes

The total number of bytes processed by the load balancer over IPv6.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

IPv6RequestCount

The number of IPv6 requests received by the load balancer.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average all return 1.

NewConnectionCount

The total number of new TCP connections established from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

ProcessedBytes

The total number of bytes processed by the load balancer over IPv4 and IPv6.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

RejectedConnectionCount

The number of connections that were rejected because the load balancer had reached its maximum number of connections.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

RequestCount

The number of requests received by the load balancer. This includes requests over IPv4 and IPv6.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average all return 1.

RequestCountPerTarget

The average number of requests received by each target in a target group. You must specify the target group using the TargetGroup dimension.

Statistics: The only valid statistic is Sum. Note that this represents the average not the sum.

RuleEvaluations

The number of rules processed by the load balancer given a request rate averaged over an hour.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

TargetConnectionErrorCount

The number of connections that were not successfully established between the load balancer and target.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

TargetResponseTime

The time elapsed, in seconds, after the request leaves the load balancer until a response from the target is received. This is equivalent to the target_processing_time field in the access logs.

Statistics: The most useful statistics are Average and pNN.NN (percentiles).

TargetTLSNegotiationErrorCount

The number of TLS connections initiated by the load balancer that did not establish a session with the target. Possible causes include a mismatch of ciphers or protocols.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum.

UnHealthyHostCount

The number of targets that are considered unhealthy.

Statistics: The most useful statistics are Average, Minimum, and Maximum.

Metric Dimensions for Application Load Balancers

To filter the metrics for your Application Load Balancer, use the following dimensions.

Dimension Description
AvailabilityZone

Filter the metric data by Availability Zone.

LoadBalancer

Filter the metric data by load balancer. Specify the load balancer as follows: app/load-balancer-name/1234567890123456 (the final portion of the load balancer ARN).

TargetGroup

Filter the metric data by target group. Specify the target group as follows: targetgroup/target-group-name/1234567890123456 (the final portion of the target group ARN).

Classic Load Balancer Metrics

The AWS/ELB namespace includes the following metrics.

Metric Description
BackendConnectionErrors

The number of connections that were not successfully established between the load balancer and the registered instances. Because the load balancer retries the connection when there are errors, this count can exceed the request rate. Note that this count also includes any connection errors related to health checks.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Average, Minimum, and Maximum are reported per load balancer node and are not typically useful. However, the difference between the minimum and maximum (or peak to average or average to trough) might be useful to determine whether a load balancer node is an outlier.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has 2 instances in us-west-2a and 2 instances in us-west-2b, and that attempts to connect to 1 instance in us-west-2a result in back-end connection errors. The sum for us-west-2a includes these connection errors, while the sum for us-west-2b does not include them. Therefore, the sum for the load balancer equals the sum for us-west-2a.

HealthyHostCount

The number of healthy instances registered with your load balancer. A newly registered instance is considered healthy after it passes the first health check. If cross-zone load balancing is enabled, the number of healthy instances for the LoadBalancerName dimension is calculated across all Availability Zones. Otherwise, it is calculated per Availability Zone.

Reporting criteria: There are registered instances

Statistics: The most useful statistics are Average and Maximum. These statistics are determined by the load balancer nodes. Note that some load balancer nodes might determine that an instance is unhealthy for a brief period while other nodes determine that it is healthy.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has 2 instances in us-west-2a and 2 instances in us-west-2b, us-west-2a has 1 unhealthy instance, and us-west-2b has no unhealthy instances. With the AvailabilityZone dimension, there is an average of 1 healthy and 1 unhealthy instance in us-west-2a, and an average of 2 healthy and 0 unhealthy instances in us-west-2b.

HTTPCode_Backend_2XX, HTTPCode_Backend_3XX, HTTPCode_Backend_4XX, HTTPCode_Backend_5XX

[HTTP listener] The number of HTTP response codes generated by registered instances. This count does not include any response codes generated by the load balancer.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average are all 1.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has 2 instances in us-west-2a and 2 instances in us-west-2b, and that requests sent to 1 instance in us-west-2a result in HTTP 500 responses. The sum for us-west-2a includes these error responses, while the sum for us-west-2b does not include them. Therefore, the sum for the load balancer equals the sum for us-west-2a.

HTTPCode_ELB_4XX

[HTTP listener] The number of HTTP 4XX client error codes generated by the load balancer. Client errors are generated when a request is malformed or incomplete.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average are all 1.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has us-west-2a and us-west-2b enabled, and that client requests include a malformed request URL. As a result, client errors would likely increase in all Availability Zones. The sum for the load balancer is the sum of the values for the Availability Zones.

HTTPCode_ELB_5XX

[HTTP listener] The number of HTTP 5XX server error codes generated by the load balancer. This count does not include any response codes generated by the registered instances. The metric is reported if there are no healthy instances registered to the load balancer, or if the request rate exceeds the capacity of the instances (spillover) or the load balancer.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average are all 1.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has us-west-2a and us-west-2b enabled, and that instances in us-west-2a are experiencing high latency and are slow to respond to requests. As a result, the surge queue for the load balancer nodes in us-west-2a fills and clients receive a 503 error. If us-west-2b continues to respond normally, the sum for the load balancer equals the sum for us-west-2a.

Latency

[HTTP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, from the time the load balancer sent the request to a registered instance until the instance started to send the response headers.

[TCP listener] The total time elapsed, in seconds, for the load balancer to successfully establish a connection to a registered instance.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Average. Use Maximum to determine whether some requests are taking substantially longer than the average. Note that Minimum is typically not useful.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has 2 instances in us-west-2a and 2 instances in us-west-2b, and that requests sent to 1 instance in us-west-2a have a higher latency. The average for us-west-2a has a higher value than the average for us-west-2b.

RequestCount

The number of requests completed or connections made during the specified interval (1 or 5 minutes).

[HTTP listener] The number of requests received and routed, including HTTP error responses from the registered instances.

[TCP listener] The number of connections made to the registered instances.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Minimum, Maximum, and Average all return 1.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has 2 instances in us-west-2a and 2 instances in us-west-2b, and that 100 requests are sent to the load balancer. There are 60 requests sent to us-west-2a, with each instance receiving 30 requests, and 40 requests sent to us-west-2b, with each instance receiving 20 requests. With the AvailabilityZone dimension, there is a sum of 60 requests in us-west-2a and 40 requests in us-west-2b. With the LoadBalancerName dimension, there is a sum of 100 requests.

SpilloverCount

The total number of requests that were rejected because the surge queue is full.

[HTTP listener] The load balancer returns an HTTP 503 error code.

[TCP listener] The load balancer closes the connection.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Sum. Note that Average, Minimum, and Maximum are reported per load balancer node and are not typically useful.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has us-west-2a and us-west-2b enabled, and that instances in us-west-2a are experiencing high latency and are slow to respond to requests. As a result, the surge queue for the load balancer node in us-west-2a fills, resulting in spillover. If us-west-2b continues to respond normally, the sum for the load balancer will be the same as the sum for us-west-2a.

SurgeQueueLength

The total number of requests that are pending routing. The load balancer queues a request if it is unable to establish a connection with a healthy instance in order to route the request. The maximum size of the queue is 1,024. Additional requests are rejected when the queue is full. For more information, see SpilloverCount.

Reporting criteria: There is a nonzero value.

Statistics: The most useful statistic is Maximum, because it represents the peak of queued requests. The Average statistic can be useful in combination with Minimum and Maximum to determine the range of queued requests. Note that Sum is not useful.

Example: Suppose that your load balancer has us-west-2a and us-west-2b enabled, and that instances in us-west-2a are experiencing high latency and are slow to respond to requests. As a result, the surge queue for the load balancer nodes in us-west-2a fills, with clients likely experiencing increased response times. If this continues, the load balancer will likely have spillovers (see the SpilloverCount metric). If us-west-2b continues to respond normally, the max for the load balancer will be the same as the max for us-west-2a.

UnHealthyHostCount

The number of unhealthy instances registered with your load balancer. An instance is considered unhealthy after it exceeds the unhealthy threshold configured for health checks. An unhealthy instance is considered healthy again after it meets the healthy threshold configured for health checks.

Reporting criteria: There are registered instances

Statistics: The most useful statistics are Average and Minimum. These statistics are determined by the load balancer nodes. Note that some load balancer nodes might determine that an instance is unhealthy for a brief period while other nodes determine that it is healthy.

Example: See HealthyHostCount.

The following metrics enable you to estimate your costs if you migrate a Classic Load Balancer to an Application Load Balancer. These metrics are intended for informational use only, not for use with CloudWatch alarms. Note that if your Classic Load Balancer has multiple listeners, these metrics are aggregated across the listeners.

These estimates are based on a load balancer with one default rule and a certificate that is 2K in size. If you use a certificate that is 4K or greater in size, we recommend that you estimate your costs as follows: create an Application Load Balancer based on your Classic Load Balancer using the migration tool and monitor the ConsumedLCUs metric for the Application Load Balancer. For more information, see Migrate from a Classic Load Balancer to an Application Load Balancer in the Elastic Load Balancing User Guide.

Metric Description
EstimatedALBActiveConnectionCount

The estimated number of concurrent TCP connections active from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.

EstimatedALBConsumedLCUs

The estimated number of load balancer capacity units (LCU) used by an Application Load Balancer. You pay for the number of LCUs that you use per hour. For more information, see LCU Details.

EstimatedALBNewConnectionCount

The estimated number of new TCP connections established from clients to the load balancer and from the load balancer to targets.

EstimatedProcessedBytes

The estimated number of bytes processed by an Application Load Balancer.

Metric Dimensions for Classic Load Balancers

To filter the metrics for your Classic Load Balancer, use the following dimensions.

Dimension Description
AvailabilityZone

Filter the metric data by the specified Availability Zone.

LoadBalancerName

Filter the metric data by the specified load balancer.