Real-time analysis using the API - Amazon Comprehend

Real-time analysis using the API

The following examples demonstrate how to use Amazon Comprehend API for real-time analysis, using the AWS CLI, Java, and Python. Use the examples to learn about the Amazon Comprehend synchronous operations and as building blocks for your own applications.

Detecting the dominant language

To determine the dominant language used in text, use the DetectDominantLanguage operation. To detect the dominant language in up to 25 documents in a batch, use the BatchDetectDominantLanguage operation. For more information, see Real-time batch APIs.

Detecting the dominant language using the AWS Command Line Interface

The following example demonstrates using the DetectDominantLanguage operation with the AWS CLI.

The example is formatted for Unix, Linux, and macOS. For Windows, replace the backslash (\) Unix continuation character at the end of each line with a caret (^).

aws comprehend detect-dominant-language \ --region region \ --text "It is raining today in Seattle."

Amazon Comprehend responds with the following:

{ "Languages": [ { "LanguageCode": "en", "Score": 0.9793661236763 } ] }

Detecting the dominant language using the AWS SDK for Java

The following example uses the DetectDominantLanguage operation with Java.

import com.amazonaws.auth.AWSCredentialsProvider; import com.amazonaws.auth.DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehend; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehendClientBuilder; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectDominantLanguageRequest; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectDominantLanguageResult; public class App { public static void main( String[] args ) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; // Create credentials using a provider chain. For more information, see // https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-java/v1/developer-guide/credentials.html AWSCredentialsProvider awsCreds = DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain.getInstance(); AmazonComprehend comprehendClient = AmazonComprehendClientBuilder.standard() .withCredentials(awsCreds) .withRegion("region") .build(); // Call detectDominantLanguage API System.out.println("Calling DetectDominantLanguage"); DetectDominantLanguageRequest detectDominantLanguageRequest = new DetectDominantLanguageRequest().withText(text); DetectDominantLanguageResult detectDominantLanguageResult = comprehendClient.detectDominantLanguage(detectDominantLanguageRequest); detectDominantLanguageResult.getLanguages().forEach(System.out::println); System.out.println("Calling DetectDominantLanguage\n"); System.out.println("Done"); } }

Detecting the dominant language using the AWS SDK for Python (Boto)

The following example demonstrates using the DetectDominantLanguage operation with Python.

import boto3 import json comprehend = boto3.client(service_name='comprehend', region_name='region') text = "It is raining today in Seattle" print('Calling DetectDominantLanguage') print(json.dumps(comprehend.detect_dominant_language(Text = text), sort_keys=True, indent=4)) print("End of DetectDominantLanguage\n")

Detecting the dominant language using the AWS SDK for .NET

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET. You can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio to develop AWS applications using .NET. It includes helpful templates and the AWS Explorer for deploying applications and managing services. For a .NET developer perspective of AWS, see the AWS guide for .NET developers.

using System; using Amazon.Comprehend; using Amazon.Comprehend.Model; namespace Comprehend { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; AmazonComprehendClient comprehendClient = new AmazonComprehendClient(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.USWest2); // Call DetectDominantLanguage API Console.WriteLine("Calling DetectDominantLanguage\n"); DetectDominantLanguageRequest detectDominantLanguageRequest = new DetectDominantLanguageRequest() { Text = text }; DetectDominantLanguageResponse detectDominantLanguageResponse = comprehendClient.DetectDominantLanguage(detectDominantLanguageRequest); foreach (DominantLanguage dl in detectDominantLanguageResponse.Languages) Console.WriteLine("Language Code: {0}, Score: {1}", dl.LanguageCode, dl.Score); Console.WriteLine("Done"); } } }

Detecting named entities

To determine the named entities in a document, use the DetectEntities operation. To detect entities in up to 25 documents in a batch, use the BatchDetectEntities operation. For more information, see Real-time batch APIs.

Detecting named entities using the AWS Command Line Interface

The following example demonstrates using the DetectEntities operation using the AWS CLI. You must specify the language of the input text.

The example is formatted for Unix, Linux, and macOS. For Windows, replace the backslash (\) Unix continuation character at the end of each line with a caret (^).

aws comprehend detect-entities \ --region region \ --language-code "en" \ --text "It is raining today in Seattle."

Amazon Comprehend responds with the following:

{ "Entities": [ { "Text": "today", "Score": 0.97, "Type": "DATE", "BeginOffset": 14, "EndOffset": 19 }, { "Text": "Seattle", "Score": 0.95, "Type": "LOCATION", "BeginOffset": 23, "EndOffset": 30 } ], "LanguageCode": "en" }

Detecting named entities using the AWS SDK for Java

The following example uses the DetectEntities operation with Java. You must specify the language of the input text.

import com.amazonaws.auth.AWSCredentialsProvider; import com.amazonaws.auth.DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehend; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehendClientBuilder; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectEntitiesRequest; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectEntitiesResult; public class App { public static void main( String[] args ) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; // Create credentials using a provider chain. For more information, see // https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-java/v1/developer-guide/credentials.html AWSCredentialsProvider awsCreds = DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain.getInstance(); AmazonComprehend comprehendClient = AmazonComprehendClientBuilder.standard() .withCredentials(awsCreds) .withRegion("region") .build(); // Call detectEntities API System.out.println("Calling DetectEntities"); DetectEntitiesRequest detectEntitiesRequest = new DetectEntitiesRequest().withText(text) .withLanguageCode("en"); DetectEntitiesResult detectEntitiesResult = comprehendClient.detectEntities(detectEntitiesRequest); detectEntitiesResult.getEntities().forEach(System.out::println); System.out.println("End of DetectEntities\n"); } }

Detecting named entities using the AWS SDK for Python (Boto)

The following example uses the DetectEntities operation with Python. You must specify the language of the input text.

import boto3 import json comprehend = boto3.client(service_name='comprehend', region_name='region') text = "It is raining today in Seattle" print('Calling DetectEntities') print(json.dumps(comprehend.detect_entities(Text=text, LanguageCode='en'), sort_keys=True, indent=4)) print('End of DetectEntities\n')

Detecting entities using the AWS SDK for .NET

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET. You can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio to develop AWS applications using .NET. It includes helpful templates and the AWS Explorer for deploying applications and managing services. For a .NET developer perspective of AWS, see the AWS guide for .NET developers.

using System; using Amazon.Comprehend; using Amazon.Comprehend.Model; namespace Comprehend { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; AmazonComprehendClient comprehendClient = new AmazonComprehendClient(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.USWest2); // Call DetectEntities API Console.WriteLine("Calling DetectEntities\n"); DetectEntitiesRequest detectEntitiesRequest = new DetectEntitiesRequest() { Text = text, LanguageCode = "en" }; DetectEntitiesResponse detectEntitiesResponse = comprehendClient.DetectEntities(detectEntitiesRequest); foreach (Entity e in detectEntitiesResponse.Entities) Console.WriteLine("Text: {0}, Type: {1}, Score: {2}, BeginOffset: {3}, EndOffset: {4}", e.Text, e.Type, e.Score, e.BeginOffset, e.EndOffset); Console.WriteLine("Done"); } } }

Detecting key phrases

To determine the key noun phrases used in text, use the DetectKeyPhrases operation. To detect the key noun phrases in up to 25 documents in a batch, use the BatchDetectKeyPhrases operation. For more information, see Real-time batch APIs.

Detecting key phrases using the AWS Command Line Interface

The following example demonstrates using the DetectKeyPhrases operation with the AWS CLI. You must specify the language of the input text.

The example is formatted for Unix, Linux, and macOS. For Windows, replace the backslash (\) Unix continuation character at the end of each line with a caret (^).

aws comprehend detect-key-phrases \ --region region \ --language-code "en" \ --text "It is raining today in Seattle."

Amazon Comprehend responds with the following:

{ "LanguageCode": "en", "KeyPhrases": [ { "Text": "today", "Score": 0.89, "BeginOffset": 14, "EndOffset": 19 }, { "Text": "Seattle", "Score": 0.91, "BeginOffset": 23, "EndOffset": 30 } ] }

Detecting key phrases using the AWS SDK for Java

The following example uses the DetectKeyPhrases operation with Java. You must specify the language of the input text.

import com.amazonaws.auth.AWSCredentialsProvider; import com.amazonaws.auth.DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehend; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehendClientBuilder; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectKeyPhrasesRequest; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectKeyPhrasesResult; public class App { public static void main( String[] args ) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; // Create credentials using a provider chain. For more information, see // https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-java/v1/developer-guide/credentials.html AWSCredentialsProvider awsCreds = DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain.getInstance(); AmazonComprehend comprehendClient = AmazonComprehendClientBuilder.standard() .withCredentials(awsCreds) .withRegion("region") .build(); // Call detectKeyPhrases API System.out.println("Calling DetectKeyPhrases"); DetectKeyPhrasesRequest detectKeyPhrasesRequest = new DetectKeyPhrasesRequest().withText(text) .withLanguageCode("en"); DetectKeyPhrasesResult detectKeyPhrasesResult = comprehendClient.detectKeyPhrases(detectKeyPhrasesRequest); detectKeyPhrasesResult.getKeyPhrases().forEach(System.out::println); System.out.println("End of DetectKeyPhrases\n"); } }

Detecting key phrases using the AWS SDK for Python (Boto)

The following example uses the DetectKeyPhrases operation with Python. You must specify the language of the input text.

import boto3 import json comprehend = boto3.client(service_name='comprehend', region_name='region') text = "It is raining today in Seattle" print('Calling DetectKeyPhrases') print(json.dumps(comprehend.detect_key_phrases(Text=text, LanguageCode='en'), sort_keys=True, indent=4)) print('End of DetectKeyPhrases\n')

Detecting key phrases using the AWS SDK for .NET

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET. You can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio to develop AWS applications using .NET. It includes helpful templates and the AWS Explorer for deploying applications and managing services. For a .NET developer perspective of AWS, see the AWS guide for .NET developers.

using System; using Amazon.Comprehend; using Amazon.Comprehend.Model; namespace Comprehend { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; AmazonComprehendClient comprehendClient = new AmazonComprehendClient(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.USWest2); // Call DetectKeyPhrases API Console.WriteLine("Calling DetectKeyPhrases"); DetectKeyPhrasesRequest detectKeyPhrasesRequest = new DetectKeyPhrasesRequest() { Text = text, LanguageCode = "en" }; DetectKeyPhrasesResponse detectKeyPhrasesResponse = comprehendClient.DetectKeyPhrases(detectKeyPhrasesRequest); foreach (KeyPhrase kp in detectKeyPhrasesResponse.KeyPhrases) Console.WriteLine("Text: {1}, Type: {1}, BeginOffset: {2}, EndOffset: {3}", kp.Text, kp.Text, kp.BeginOffset, kp.EndOffset); Console.WriteLine("Done"); } } }

Determining sentiment

Amazon Comprehend provides the following API operations for analyzing sentiment:

Determining sentiment using the AWS Command Line Interface

The following example demonstrates using the DetectSentiment operation with the AWS CLI. This example specifies the language of the input text.

The example is formatted for Unix, Linux, and macOS. For Windows, replace the backslash (\) Unix continuation character at the end of each line with a caret (^).

aws comprehend detect-sentiment \ --region region \ --language-code "en" \ --text "It is raining today in Seattle."

Amazon Comprehend responds with the following:

{ "SentimentScore": { "Mixed": 0.014585512690246105, "Positive": 0.31592071056365967, "Neutral": 0.5985543131828308, "Negative": 0.07093945890665054 }, "Sentiment": "NEUTRAL", "LanguageCode": "en" }

Determining sentiment using the AWS SDK for Java

The following example Java program detects the sentiment of input text. You must specify the language of the input text.

import com.amazonaws.auth.AWSCredentialsProvider; import com.amazonaws.auth.DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehend; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehendClientBuilder; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectSentimentRequest; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectSentimentResult; public class App { public static void main( String[] args ) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; // Create credentials using a provider chain. For more information, see // https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-java/v1/developer-guide/credentials.html AWSCredentialsProvider awsCreds = DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain.getInstance(); AmazonComprehend comprehendClient = AmazonComprehendClientBuilder.standard() .withCredentials(awsCreds) .withRegion("region") .build(); // Call detectSentiment API System.out.println("Calling DetectSentiment"); DetectSentimentRequest detectSentimentRequest = new DetectSentimentRequest().withText(text) .withLanguageCode("en"); DetectSentimentResult detectSentimentResult = comprehendClient.detectSentiment(detectSentimentRequest); System.out.println(detectSentimentResult); System.out.println("End of DetectSentiment\n"); System.out.println( "Done" ); } }

Determining sentiment using the AWS SDK for Python (Boto)

The following Python program detects the sentiment of input text. You must specify the language of the input text.

import boto3 import json comprehend = boto3.client(service_name='comprehend', region_name='region') text = "It is raining today in Seattle" print('Calling DetectSentiment') print(json.dumps(comprehend.detect_sentiment(Text=text, LanguageCode='en'), sort_keys=True, indent=4)) print('End of DetectSentiment\n')

Determining sentiment using the AWS SDK for .NET

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET. You can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio to develop AWS applications using .NET. It includes helpful templates and the AWS Explorer for deploying applications and managing services. For a .NET developer perspective of AWS, see the AWS guide for .NET developers.

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET.

using System; using Amazon.Comprehend; using Amazon.Comprehend.Model; namespace Comprehend { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; AmazonComprehendClient comprehendClient = new AmazonComprehendClient(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.USWest2); // Call DetectKeyPhrases API Console.WriteLine("Calling DetectSentiment"); DetectSentimentRequest detectSentimentRequest = new DetectSentimentRequest() { Text = text, LanguageCode = "en" }; DetectSentimentResponse detectSentimentResponse = comprehendClient.DetectSentiment(detectSentimentRequest); Console.WriteLine(detectSentimentResponse.Sentiment); Console.WriteLine("Done"); } } }

Detecting syntax

To parse text to extract the individual words and determine the parts of speech for each word, use the DetectSyntax operation. To parse the syntax of up to 25 documents in a batch, use the BatchDetectSyntax operation. For more information, see Real-time batch APIs.

Detecting syntax using the AWS Command Line Interface.

The following example demonstrates using the DetectSyntax operation with the AWS CLI. This example specifies the language of the input text.

The example is formatted for Unix, Linux, and macOS. For Windows, replace the backslash (\) Unix continuation character at the end of each line with a caret (^).

aws comprehend detect-syntax \ --region region \ --language-code "en" \ --text "It is raining today in Seattle."

Amazon Comprehend responds with the following:

{ "SyntaxTokens": [ { "Text": "It", "EndOffset": 2, "BeginOffset": 0, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "PRON", "Score": 0.8389829397201538 }, "TokenId": 1 }, { "Text": "is", "EndOffset": 5, "BeginOffset": 3, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "AUX", "Score": 0.9189288020133972 }, "TokenId": 2 }, { "Text": "raining", "EndOffset": 13, "BeginOffset": 6, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "VERB", "Score": 0.9977611303329468 }, "TokenId": 3 }, { "Text": "today", "EndOffset": 19, "BeginOffset": 14, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "NOUN", "Score": 0.9993606209754944 }, "TokenId": 4 }, { "Text": "in", "EndOffset": 22, "BeginOffset": 20, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "ADP", "Score": 0.9999061822891235 }, "TokenId": 5 }, { "Text": "Seattle", "EndOffset": 30, "BeginOffset": 23, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "PROPN", "Score": 0.9940338730812073 }, "TokenId": 6 }, { "Text": ".", "EndOffset": 31, "BeginOffset": 30, "PartOfSpeech": { "Tag": "PUNCT", "Score": 0.9999997615814209 }, "TokenId": 7 } ] }

Detecting syntax using the AWS SDK for Java

The following Java program detects the syntax of the input text. You must specify the language of the input text.

import com.amazonaws.auth.AWSCredentialsProvider; import com.amazonaws.auth.DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehend; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehendClientBuilder; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectSyntaxRequest; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.DetectSyntaxResult; public class App { public static void main( String[] args ) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle."; String region = "region" // Create credentials using a provider chain. For more information, see // https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-java/v1/developer-guide/credentials.html AWSCredentialsProvider awsCreds = DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain.getInstance(); AmazonComprehend comprehendClient = AmazonComprehendClientBuilder.standard() .withCredentials(awsCreds) .withRegion(region) .build(); // Call detectSyntax API System.out.println("Calling DetectSyntax"); DetectSyntaxRequest detectSyntaxRequest = new DetectSyntaxRequest() .withText(text) .withLanguageCode("en"); DetectSyntaxResult detectSyntaxResult = comprehendClient.detectSyntax(detectSyntaxRequest); detectSyntaxResult.getSyntaxTokens().forEach(System.out::println); System.out.println("End of DetectSyntax\n"); System.out.println( "Done" ); } }

Detecting parts of speech using the AWS SDK for Python (Boto)

The following Python program detects the parts of speech in the input text. You must specify the language of the input text.

import boto3 import json comprehend = boto3.client(service_name='comprehend', region_name='region') text = "It is raining today in Seattle" print('Calling DetectSyntax') print(json.dumps(comprehend.detect_syntax(Text=text, LanguageCode='en'), sort_keys=True, indent=4)) print('End of DetectSyntax\n')

Detecting syntax using the AWS SDK for .NET

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET. You can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio to develop AWS applications using .NET. It includes helpful templates and the AWS Explorer for deploying applications and managing services. For a .NET developer perspective of AWS, see the AWS guide for .NET developers.

using System; using Amazon.Comprehend; using Amazon.Comprehend.Model; namespace Comprehend { class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { String text = "It is raining today in Seattle"; AmazonComprehendClient comprehendClient = new AmazonComprehendClient(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.region); // Call DetectSyntax API Console.WriteLine("Calling DetectSyntax\n"); DetectSyntaxRequest detectSyntaxRequest = new DetectSyntaxRequest() { Text = text, LanguageCode = "en" }; DetectSyntaxResponse detectSyntaxResponse = comprehendClient.DetectSyntax(detectSyntaxRequest); foreach (SyntaxToken s in detectSyntaxResponse.SyntaxTokens) Console.WriteLine("Text: {0}, PartOfSpeech: {1}, Score: {2}, BeginOffset: {3}, EndOffset: {4}", e.Text, e.PartOfSpeech, e.Score, e.BeginOffset, e.EndOffset); Console.WriteLine("Done"); } } }

Real-time batch APIs

To send batches of up to 25 documents, you can use the Amazon Comprehend real-time batch operations. Calling a batch operation is identical to calling the single document APIs for each document in the request. Using the batch APIs can result in better performance for your applications. For more information, see Multiple document synchronous processing.

Batch processing with the SDK for Java

The following sample program shows how to use the BatchDetectEntities operation with the SDK for Java. The response from the server contains a BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult object for each document that was successfully processed. If there is an error processing a document, there will be a record in the error list in the response. The example gets each of the documents with an error and resends them.

import com.amazonaws.auth.AWSStaticCredentialsProvider; import com.amazonaws.auth.DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehend; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.AmazonComprehendClientBuilder; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.BatchDetectEntitiesRequest; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.BatchDetectEntitiesResult; import com.amazonaws.services.comprehend.model.BatchItemError; public class App { public static void main( String[] args ) { // Create credentials using a provider chain. For more information, see // https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-java/v1/developer-guide/credentials.html AWSCredentialsProvider awsCreds = DefaultAWSCredentialsProviderChain.getInstance(); AmazonComprehend comprehendClient = AmazonComprehendClientBuilder.standard() .withCredentials(awsCreds) .withRegion("region") .build(); String[] textList = {"I love Seattle", "Today is Sunday", "Tomorrow is Monday", "I love Seattle"}; // Call detectEntities API System.out.println("Calling BatchDetectEntities"); BatchDetectEntitiesRequest batchDetectEntitiesRequest = new BatchDetectEntitiesRequest().withTextList(textList) .withLanguageCode("en"); BatchDetectEntitiesResult batchDetectEntitiesResult = client.batchDetectEntities(batchDetectEntitiesRequest); for(BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult item : batchDetectEntitiesResult.getResultList()) { System.out.println(item); } // check if we need to retry failed requests if (batchDetectEntitiesResult.getErrorList().size() != 0) { System.out.println("Retrying Failed Requests"); ArrayList<String> textToRetry = new ArrayList<String>(); for(BatchItemError errorItem : batchDetectEntitiesResult.getErrorList()) { textToRetry.add(textList[errorItem.getIndex()]); } batchDetectEntitiesRequest = new BatchDetectEntitiesRequest().withTextList(textToRetry).withLanguageCode("en"); batchDetectEntitiesResult = client.batchDetectEntities(batchDetectEntitiesRequest); for(BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult item : batchDetectEntitiesResult.getResultList()) { System.out.println(item); } } System.out.println("End of DetectEntities"); } }

Batch processing with the AWS SDK for .NET

The following sample program shows how to use the BatchDetectEntities operation with the AWS SDK for .NET. The response from the server contains a BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult object for each document that was successfully processed. If there is an error processing a document, there will be a record in the error list in the response. The example gets each of the documents with an error and resends them.

The .NET example in this section uses the AWS SDK for .NET. You can use the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio to develop AWS applications using .NET. It includes helpful templates and the AWS Explorer for deploying applications and managing services. For a .NET developer perspective of AWS, see the AWS guide for .NET developers.

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using Amazon.Comprehend; using Amazon.Comprehend.Model; namespace Comprehend { class Program { // Helper method for printing properties static private void PrintEntity(Entity entity) { Console.WriteLine(" Text: {0}, Type: {1}, Score: {2}, BeginOffset: {3} EndOffset: {4}", entity.Text, entity.Type, entity.Score, entity.BeginOffset, entity.EndOffset); } static void Main(string[] args) { AmazonComprehendClient comprehendClient = new AmazonComprehendClient(Amazon.RegionEndpoint.USWest2); List<String> textList = new List<String>() { { "I love Seattle" }, { "Today is Sunday" }, { "Tomorrow is Monday" }, { "I love Seattle" } }; // Call detectEntities API Console.WriteLine("Calling BatchDetectEntities"); BatchDetectEntitiesRequest batchDetectEntitiesRequest = new BatchDetectEntitiesRequest() { TextList = textList, LanguageCode = "en" }; BatchDetectEntitiesResponse batchDetectEntitiesResponse = comprehendClient.BatchDetectEntities(batchDetectEntitiesRequest); foreach (BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult item in batchDetectEntitiesResponse.ResultList) { Console.WriteLine("Entities in {0}:", textList[item.Index]); foreach (Entity entity in item.Entities) PrintEntity(entity); } // check if we need to retry failed requests if (batchDetectEntitiesResponse.ErrorList.Count != 0) { Console.WriteLine("Retrying Failed Requests"); List<String> textToRetry = new List<String>(); foreach(BatchItemError errorItem in batchDetectEntitiesResponse.ErrorList) textToRetry.Add(textList[errorItem.Index]); batchDetectEntitiesRequest = new BatchDetectEntitiesRequest() { TextList = textToRetry, LanguageCode = "en" }; batchDetectEntitiesResponse = comprehendClient.BatchDetectEntities(batchDetectEntitiesRequest); foreach(BatchDetectEntitiesItemResult item in batchDetectEntitiesResponse.ResultList) { Console.WriteLine("Entities in {0}:", textList[item.Index]); foreach (Entity entity in item.Entities) PrintEntity(entity); } } Console.WriteLine("End of DetectEntities"); } } }

Batch processing with the AWS CLI

These examples show how to use the batch API operations using the AWS Command Line Interface. All of the operations except BatchDetectDominantLanguage use the following JSON file called process.json as input. For that operation the LanguageCode entity is not included.

The third document in the JSON file ("$$$$$$$$") will cause an error during batch processing. It is included so that the operations will include an BatchItemError in the response.

{ "LanguageCode": "en", "TextList": [ "I have been living in Seattle for almost 4 years", "It is raining today in Seattle", "$$$$$$$$" ] }

The examples are formatted for Unix, Linux, and macOS. For Windows, replace the backslash (\) Unix continuation character at the end of each line with a caret (^).

Detect the dominant language using a batch (AWS CLI)

The BatchDetectDominantLanguage operation determines the dominant language of each document in a batch. For a list of the languages that Amazon Comprehend can detect, see Dominant language. The following AWS CLI command calls the BatchDetectDominantLanguage operation.

aws comprehend batch-detect-dominant-language \ --endpoint endpoint \ --region region \ --cli-input-json file://path to input file/process.json

The following is the response from the BatchDetectDominantLanguage operation:

{ "ResultList": [ { "Index": 0, "Languages":[ { "LanguageCode":"en", "Score": 0.99 } ] }, { "Index": 1 "Languages":[ { "LanguageCode":"en", "Score": 0.82 } ] } ], "ErrorList": [ { "Index": 2, "ErrorCode": "InternalServerException", "ErrorMessage": "Unexpected Server Error. Please try again." } ] }

Detect entities using a batch (AWS CLI)

Use the BatchDetectEntities operation to find the entities present in a batch of documents. For more information about entities, see Entities. The following AWS CLI command calls the BatchDetectEntities operation.

aws comprehend batch-detect-entities \ --endpoint endpoint \ --region region \ --cli-input-json file://path to input file/process.json

Detect key phrases using a batch (AWS CLI)

The BatchDetectKeyPhrases operation returns the key noun phrases in a batch of documents. The following AWS CLI command calls the BatchDetectKeyNounPhrases operation.

aws comprehend batch-detect-key-phrases --endpoint endpoint --region region --cli-input-json file://path to input file/process.json

Detect sentiment using a batch (AWS CLI)

Detect the overall sentiment of a batch of documents using the BatchDetectSentiment operation. The following AWS CLI command calls the BatchDetectSentiment operation.

aws comprehend batch-detect-sentiment \ --endpoint endpoint \ --region region \ --cli-input-json file://path to input file/process.json